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July 22 2014

styledotcom Is activewear as ready-to-wear really so revolutionary? Norma Kamali's been doing it since the '80s. stylem.ag/1o1xLOi

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12 posts tagged "Glenn O’Brien"

Byronesque.com Brings Its Vintage Treasures Offline

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Byronesque.com//Offline

Last year, Gill Linton launched Byronesque.com, a comprehensive Web site that, backed by Andrew Rosen and the late Marvin Traub, offers high-end vintage wares and sharp editorials. The online platform boasts a veritable treasure trove of rare, authenticated vintage designs, like an azure Jean Paul Gaultier frock, an asymmetrical Yohji Yamamoto dress, and a bevy of Thierry Mugler and Alaïa. And while it all looks spectacular in one’s browser, Linton felt she should create an IRL experience with the digital destination’s best stock.

Enter the site’s first brick-and-mortar venture, Byronesque.com//Offline, an exhibition and boutique housed in the dilapidated annex of the James A. Farley Post Office in New York City. Offline is complete with video installations, melancholic wall art by Craig Ward, and a vault of approximately forty impeccably dressed mannequins. Yesterday evening, insiders gathered to fete the project, which was punctuated with a live Polaroid photography session by the inimitable Michèle Lamy. “It’s difficult to [decide] what is mainstream or not…but being here feels real, and what they are trying to do is very important,” Lamy said of the site.

Byronesque.com//Offline

“There’s so much potential in vintage fashion,” said Linton. “It’s made better, there’s a story behind it, and there’s a history behind it. The way I merchandise the store is through storytelling—there’s a curve of Vivienne Westwood from Pirate to Seditionaries, for example—but it’s not that it has to be a linear progression. It’s about the energy of stuff.”

The stuff on display includes a 1984 John Galliano men’s kimono coat from his graduate Central Saint Martins collection, Les Incroyables (not for sale); a burlap Alexander McQueen look from F/W ’02; a 1986 Azzedine Alaïa leather zip dress; and a Katharine Hamnett allover marijuana-leaf-print bodysuit.

Glenn O’Brien lent his support by co-hosting the affair. “Everybody mixes vintage in,” he said, “I can’t tell you how long I’ve had this Kilgour, French, & Stanbury coat; it must be twenty years since I bought it at Barneys. Vintage is kind of where the next ideas come from. You can be a step ahead by wearing something that’s so out that it’s just about ready to come back.”

Byronesque.com//Offline will open to the public on December 12 and run through the 15th. Located at the James A. Farley Post Office on Eighth Avenue at West 31st Street, the show will be open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Photos: Courtesy Photos/div>

Margiela Teams Up With an All-American All-Star

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Nicola Formichetti

It takes a lot for anything to stand out in fashion week’s frenzy of parties and press releases. But a collaboration between Converse and Maison Martin Margiela does just that. The classic All-Star and Jack Purcell kicks have been generously coated in Margiela’s iconic white paint. With time, the paint wears away to expose the color beneath.

Last night, despite the general sense of fatigue permeating every single human interaction, a crowd turned out to fete the marriage of the all-American and the French avant-garde at the Swiss Institute. Guests snacked on Brooklyn’s Dough doughnuts and spring rolls—served in appropriately irreverent Chinese takeout containers—and danced to the deejay beats of Glenn O’Brien. The downtown paragon clued us in on his playlist: Jean-Michel Basquiat with Rammellzee, Spoonie Gee, and Naughty By Nature’s “O.P.P.”—a crowd favorite.

Across the space, Nicola Formichetti marveled at one of the many pieces of installation art: Converse All-Stars floating in a canal of white paint, laces frozen midair. “I was like, How did they do that?, so I touched it…I thought they chopped the shoes [off]. You don’t get surprised so often. We see so much stuff online and at shows and events, and I really get like—whoa!—but they’ve still got it, the house of Margiela and Converse. They’ve still got it.”

Photos: Neil Rasmus/BFANYC.com
Photos: Neil Rasmus/BFANYC.com

Bull’s Eye: Liberty United x Giles & Brother

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Philip Crangi, Cara Buono, Peter Thum, and Courtney Crangi at the launch of Liberty United

Last night at the Jane hotel’s rooftop bar, the likes of Parker Posey, Jenna Lyons, and Glenn O’Brien joined social entrepreneur Peter Thum to fete the debut of his brave new label, Liberty United. Thum works with local governments to source confiscated or bought-back firearms and melted-down bullet casings, which he then hands over to artists and jewelers to turn into covetable, and politically conscious, accessories. A portion of the proceeds from the collections will be donated to initiatives seeking to reduce gun-related violence in the U.S.

Thum tapped Giles & Brother’s Philip and Courtney Crangi to design Liberty United’s first lineup, which comprised a series of necklaces, rings, and bracelets in the form of brass, steel, and sterling-silver nails. The wares are each stamped with the serial number of a permanently impounded and decommissioned weapon and can be engraved with up to eight characters of your choosing. “It’s our signature,” Philip Crangi told Style.com of the spike motif, “but it’s a brand-new model.” Showing off a tray of brass bracelets, he added, “We made these out of smelted bullet shells.”

Liberty United's debut collection with Giles & Brother

It was Thum’s wife, actress Cara Buono, who pushed for Liberty United on American turf, after witnessing her husband’s success with Fonderie 47, a similar project that he launched in Africa. “[Thum] doesn’t do this for glamour,” said Courtney Crangi. “He does it because of his heart.”

Guests were eager to purchase and personalize their jewelry. Earlier in the evening, Philip surprised Courtney with a cuff imprinted with “MOMMY,” and Prabal Gurung chose the initials “G.U.P.” for his bracelet. While that monogram stood for “Grace Under Pressure,” it could just as easily have been read as a fitting, mission-centric message: Guns Used Peacefully.

Giles & Brother for Liberty United can now be ordered online, at www.libertyunited.com. Prices start at $85.

Photo: Billy Farrell/ BFAnyc.com

A Lot Can Happen on La Divanee

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Jessica Mitrani and Rossy de Palma

Last night, director Jessica Mitrani invited such pals as Threeasfour’s Gabriel Asfour, Adi Gil, and Angela Donhauser, Glenn O’Brien, and Victoria Bartlett to an intimate gathering at her exotic (think zebra-skin rugs and a grand white peacock) Tribeca apartment. The occasion was the completion of her new short film—La Divanee, starring Fatimah Azzahra—

De Palma's voice-over helps tell the story of Mitrani's heroine, who chooses to spend her entire life actively reclining on a chaise longue. “It came from a few ideas—the first being when I wake up in the morning and can just contemplate in my bed. I think those moments are quite special. And the other idea was about a reclining nude,” Mitrani explained, noting that she felt classical female nude artworks focused on women of leisure and were geared toward the male gaze. “I thought, What if I make a recline that’s very productive?” Indeed, the leading lady is just that—during the movie she gives birth, writes seven novels, and hosts a salon every Wednesday. In keeping with Mitrani’s artistic inspiration, the film’s star is nude, save what appears to be a giant strip of snakeskin draped over her body. But the director—who won last year’s ASVOFF festival with her religious hat-centric short, Headpieces for Peace—asserted that clothes, and what they represent, are essential to her films. “Fashion is narrative; it’s part of the dialogue. All my films have a fashion element because fashion is a mode of communication.”

Speaking of clothes, de Palma, who was decked out in Dolce & Gabbana, Miu Miu, and Armani, offered, “This is a very special film. Jessica has an amazing energy and sense of humor.” When asked where she’d choose to perma-lounge, de Palma responded that she wouldn’t mind spending the rest of her days in New York perched “somewhere on the High Line.”

Bartlett, whose one-eyed cat, i-D (named for the mag), has a supporting role in the film, quipped that she’s not the “reclining” type. “I’m too active. I’m not a couch potato…” That may have something to do with her latest project—a reimagining of the VPL aesthetic via high-fashion gym clothes. “We’re converting everything into activewear. It’s going to be gymwear, but it’s going to have a life that can cross from day gym to night.” The sporty endeavor is set to launch this July.

Photo: Carly Otness/BFAnyc.com 

RISD’s Feeling Fine and Dandy

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The dandy: It’s a term we hear on loop, it seems, when it comes to horn-rim-wearing street-style stars and all things bespoke or buttoned-up. But the dandy has a far richer history than the current zeitgeist lets on; one that includes the likes of George “Beau” Brummell—an arbiter of men’s fashion in eighteenth-century England who was known for being “extremely neat”—King George IV, Oscar Wilde, and Andy Warhol (whose paint-splattered shoes are pictured below). On April 28, Providence’s RISD Museum of Art will celebrate the term with the opening of its summer exhibition, Artist/Rebel/Dandy: Men of Fashion.

“As we delved into the subject of the dandy in art, literature, and history on an intellectual level, we felt a strong need to focus on the tangible garments worn by dandies past and present,” said Kate Irvin, the museum’s curator of costume and textiles. The selection runs the full temporal gamut—with current provocateurs such as Thom Browne and Waris Ahluwalia featured alongside more archival names, like Stephen Tennant (above, left), Charles Baudelaire, Richard Merkin, and Malcolm McLaren.

As assistant curator Laurie Brewer details, dandyism is as diverse as it is distinct, and it’s not strictly limited to one bracket of dressing. “I am always smitten with the extraordinary feat of what a bespoke suit can be—but I also fully appreciate Rick Owens’ radical take on menswear—hard and romantic, masculine and feminine.” Owens is also featured in the exhibit, lending credence to the sartorial vastness encompassed by the term. Expanding on the subject, the curators concluded, “there may be boundaries and rules that one feels compelled to follow when dressing, but one must always recognize that they are elastic.” Alongside the exhibition comes the release of a corresponding illustrated book, which features essays by the likes of Thom Browne, Glenn O’Brien, and Style.com’s editor in chief, Dirk Standen.

Artist/Rebel/Dandy: Men of Fashion will run from April 28 through August 18 at the RISD Museum of Art .

Photos: Cecil Beaton (Stephen Tennant); Courtesy of the RISD Museum of Art (Warhol shoes)