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July 29 2014

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8 posts tagged "Grace Coddington"

Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book

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Carine Roitfeld

If Carine Roitfeld has proven anything in her three decades in the fashion game, it’s that she’s a master of reinvention—of both herself and others. All one needs to do is look at her latest CR Fashion Book cover—which features reality-TV-star-turned-quasi-fashion-world fascination Kim Kardashian showing off a gilded grill—to see that. The editor, stylist, and consultant, who left her decade-long post as editor in chief of Paris Vogue in 2011 only to launch her abovementioned biannual publication to much fanfare in New York a year later, is the subject of Fabien Constant’s new documentary, Mademoiselle C. The film, which debuted in New York last night, chronicles the making of the inaugural issue of Roitfeld’s magazine and offers an intimate look into the life of the editor. “I was very surprised when I saw the film for the first time,” Roitfeld told us, donning a youthful Céline crop top and Miu Miu denim skirt. “I didn’t imagine it would be so personal. You see everything—my family, my kids, my husband, my apartment, my [dance] lessons, and this was very difficult.” We have to say, though, it was refreshing to see the editor—who’s famed for working with everyone from Karl Lagerfeld and Tom Ford to Bruce Weber and Mario Testino—behave so candidly in front of the camera. Style.com caught up with Roitfeld prior to the film’s premiere to talk life after Vogue, Nicolas Ghesquière, the future of fashion, and what it means to be sexy.

Before I turned on my recorder, you were talking about how much you admire Coco Chanel. Why is that?
She came back to work at almost 70 years old, and she came back as a success, and America was the first country to welcome her. France didn’t. They always say, you’re never a king or a queen in your own country.

Is that why you came to New York to launch CR Fashion Book? Do you feel like the Americans made you a “queen”?
I think America was very nice with me, because the day I finished Paris Vogue, I immediately got a phone call from America. Once you’re in New York, you jump. Paris is mostly retired people—I love it, and it’s a beautiful city, but it’s quite slow. In New York, you can do anything—you can shoot on Sundays, you can shoot at night, you can get a pink dog, everything you want is possible. It’s like Jay-Z’s song about the Big Apple—you never stop.

Do you miss being the editor in chief of Paris Vogue?
No. I still like the title. I think it’s a magical title, and there was a Vogue before me, there will be a Vogue after me. I have no regrets. Ten years is quite long. Otherwise, you stay forever, and you settle into office life, and I don’t like office life. It’s difficult to do things on your own, but I think it’s very exciting, and everyone says, oh, you look younger than before, and it’s just because I’m learning more.

Do you think that Emmanuelle Alt is taking Paris Vogue in the right direction?
I will not look at it. It’s her thing. It’s totally different. I don’t want to compare and I don’t want to judge. I’m over this now, you know? I do my own thing, and it takes me enough time, enough energy, I’m not here to criticize. I don’t care. I have so many projects—I’ve become a cover girl and a grandma at the same time. I have so many exciting things in my life. I don’t need to look back.

Before you launched CR Fashion Book, there were rumors that you weren’t on the best of terms with Nicolas Ghesquière. What’s your relationship like with him now?
This is the bullshit of politics in fashion. I’ve never had a problem with Nicolas. I just sent him a text and said, “I miss you!” I’ve known him since the very beginning. I think he’s the most talented person in fashion. He’s very, very smart. I’m sure he’s coming back, and I hope it’s very soon, because we miss him. And I think he’s going to surprise everyone. There are not so many big talents today, and he’s one of them.

Inevitably, Mademoiselle C is going to be compared to The September Issue, and you to Anna Wintour. How do you feel about being compared to her?
I was compared to Anna for many years. But I worked with her. I was working for her, and I think she’s a very tough woman, but she’s very honest. She’s a hard worker, and she and Grace [Coddington] have a lot of passion. And you feel passion in Mademoiselle C, too. Totally different, though. Vogue is the biggest magazine in the world; they have a lot of money. For our first issue, we had four people doing the magazine, but we have the same passion. Continue Reading “Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book” »

Diana Vreeland Lights Up Paris Once More

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There are few people who could warrant a breakfast of Champagne and caviar, but Diana Vreeland is one of them. Yesterday, in collaboration with Barneys, Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s (pictured, center) film about her legendary grandmother-in-law, Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has To Travel, made its Paris debut. And given the editor’s relationship with the city (she was born here, after all), it was a significant screening, with the likes of Grace Coddington, L’Wren Scott, Michele Lamy, Olivier Rousteing (pictured, right), and Patrick Demarchelier all turning out to Paris’ Pagoda Theater for the event. “Mrs. Vreeland was such a dramatic personage that if anybody was cinematic, it’s her,” said Valerie Steele, who was seeing the film for the first time. “She totally worshiped Paris and the whole world of Paris fashion. I think she would be delighted to be here. And for all we know, maybe she is.”

Mrs. Vreeland’s presence was felt. “I remember when she was the editor of Vogue in the sixties, she moved the entire offices to adjoining suites at Le Crillon,” Vreeland’s grandson Alex recalled. “They took out all the beds and it looked like something from a James Bond movie because you’d open the door and see all these women running around or typing letters.” After the film had ended, viewers were given red gift boxes cleverly filled with peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and a bottle of scotch. The editor notoriously enjoyed the unorthodox combination for lunch every day. The box also contained a notecard with one of Vreeland’s most famous quotes: “Fashion must be the most intoxicating release from the banality of the world.” Certainly, her words provided a poignant reminder at the end of a very long, albeit intoxicating, fashion month.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Shoppers, Gird Thyselves: Fashion’s Night Out Approaches

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Ready, set, FNO: September 6th marks the fourth annual Fashion’s Night out, the no holds barred evening of shopping that kicks off the spring shows during New York Fashion Week. The definitive guide to the action, www.fashionsnightout.com goes live today, detailing the goings-on near you—whether that means Manhattan or one of the more than 500 participating U.S. and international cities.

In NYC, boutiques will celebrate with extended hours, the better to lap up snacks, drinks, and celebrity sightings. Alexa Chung will spin at Moschino; Solange Knowles, at DVF. MAC’s Soho store may have the event to beat, with a live performance by Azealia Banks. Some stores will even debut new products: Balenciaga will unveil the Pumpkin collection, an accessories collaboration with Vogue creative director Grace Coddington featuring her beloved cat, Pumpkin; Chloé will release its new Alice bag. Over at Stella McCartney, you can even design your own handbag.

If Fashion’s Night Out alone won’t get you out of the house, maybe Bergdorf Goodman’s 111th birthday will—the retailer is taking advantage of the timing to celebrate its centennial-plus, with guests including Rachel Zoe and Thakoon Panichgul. At Saks, the focus is on designers, with appearances from Max and Lubov Azria, Oscar de la Renta (who will launch his new fragrance), Suno’s Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis (who have collaborated with Minx to create special nail designs) and Kimberly Ovitz (who’s teamed up with Rihanna’s tattoo artist, Josh Lord, to create custom body art for partygoers), among others.

The streets will teem; will the registers ring? That remains to be seen, though the outlook is hopeful. But those who prefer to avoid the crowds can splurge in comfort, too: Again this year, there’ll be plenty of deals accessible right from their apartments, with special offers and savings online.

Photo: Fashionsnightout.com

Legendary Lensman Arthur Elgort
On His Life In Fashion Photography

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Arthur Elgort—who, tonight, will receive the CFDA Board of Directors’ Special Tribute award—is an industry legend. Over the course of a 40-year career, Elgort has shot for everyone from Vogue and Vanity Fair to Valentino and Karl Lagerfeld. After a stroke last year left him unable to move his limbs, Elgort’s career very nearly ended, but following frustrating months of recovery, the photographer beat the odds and regained movement in his hands and arms. He’s back at work in his large, sunny studio in Soho and recently shot a spread for Vogue‘s April issue with his close friend Grace Coddington, who will present him with his tribute at tonight’s CFDA Awards ceremony.

Here, Elgort speaks with Style.com about the changing style of fashion photography, models versus ballerinas, and the new Madonna—his fellow CFDA honoree.

How did you react when you found out about your CFDA award?
I was listening to a Tchaikovsky piece, I think it was Trio no. 7 or something, and they told me Diane von Furstenberg was on the phone. When they said that, I said, “What is she calling about? I don’t think she wants to give me a job, so maybe she’s got an award for me.”

Your recovery from your recent stroke is an incredible story of perseverance. What was it like to learn your craft all over again?
Terrible, obviously. You know, I couldn’t even hold a camera. I had to start all over again. I shoot differently now. I still take pictures all the time, but it’s not exactly the same. That’s the way it is—I could be dead, so this is a lot better than that.

What would you say makes a great fashion photo?
Well, it can last [a] long ]time] and it’s still good. Would I wear the clothes myself? No. But something about it is nice.

Your candid, “snapshot” style helped to transform the genre.
Well, so they say, yes. I think there were other people there too but they weren’t as lucky as me. I didn’t do it alone, really. I was at the right place at the right time. Continue Reading “Legendary Lensman Arthur Elgort
On His Life In Fashion Photography” »

Bill, Please

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In the bygone days before street-style blogs, there was just one man whose eye you hoped your outfit would catch. That’s The New York Times‘ Bill Cunningham, of course, a beloved staple on the fashion circuit for the last 50-plus years and the man who pioneered the art of snapping fashion trends as they happen on the street, at the gala, or in the front row. So no surprise that last night, several of his acolytes turned up at the CFDA and Calvin Klein-hosted screening of the documentary Bill Cunningham New York to pay tribute. “Of course we had to see this film,” Garance Doré said. Her date, Scott Schuman (a.k.a. the Sartorialist) agreed: “I think any street-style photographer is familiar with his work.”

This was a tribute paid in absentia: The modest Cunningham has made it mostly a point not to attend screenings of the film. But he was practically the only person in fashion not present. Calvin Klein’s Francisco Costa and Italo Zucchelli (above, with BCNY producer Philip Gefter and director Richard Press), Carolyn Murphy, Rag & Bone’s Marcus Wainwright, Bergdorf Goodman’s Linda Fargo, and editors like Grace Coddington and Sally Singer all made a Monday evening appearance. So did model Ginta Lapina, who saved her last night out before fashion week fittings for the documentary. “I love movies. It’s one of my favorite things to do in cold weather,” the 21-year-old blonde told us before the lights dimmed. “I see him all the time during the shows and he’s always so sweet. But then I watched the trailer before I came here and I’m excited to find out a different side.”

It’s that different side that the doc highlights, particularly Cunningham’s deep commitment to his craft. “You see him at all the events, but you didn’t know about his integrity,” Costa marveled. “One of the most amazing things is his honesty. It’s beyond inspirational.”

Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com