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August 20 2014

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4 posts tagged "Greg Armas"

Post-Paris, New York’s Party Circuit Is Back on Track

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Kate Foley, Serafina SamaJust when you thought that the peak season for air kisses and fashion chitchat had passed, wham!—along comes one of those New York City weeks that’s chockablock with events. Time to get your nice clothes back from the cleaner, where they’ve been sitting since your return from Paris, and refresh ye olde manicure.

Monday-night festivities included a dinner on the terrace of the Gramercy Park Hotel celebrating Charlotte Ronson’s collaboration with Vogue Eyewear, hosted by Eva Mendes.

Tuesday night found London-based Isa Arfen designer Serafina Sama throwing her first-ever Stateside bash at hot spot Omar’s. She drew quite a photogenic crowd, including her stylist, Valentine Fillol-Cordier, who flew in for the occasion; model/activist Kyleigh Kuhn; and host Kate Foley. Later that evening, action moved to the Fat Radish, where Antwerp-based designer (and Woolmark Prize-winner) Christian Wijnants presided over a family-style meal of celery pot pie and monkfish curry. (Just the hearty thing for the start of a cold snap.)

Family-style was the name of the game again on Wednesday night, which saw Assembly New York serving up farro and roast chicken at the fantastic new restaurant Dimes, on Division Street. Assembly ringleader Greg Armas and dinner hosts Ana Kras and Devendra Banhart mixed it up with the crowd. Meanwhile, down the road on Canal Street, Sea designers Monica Paolini and Sean Monahan were hosting at home and had cooked dinner themselves. The potatoes were particularly delicious: onion, rosemary, and lots and lots butter did the trick, according to Paolini. Worth getting the clothes back from the cleaner for.

Photo: Courtesy of Isa Arfen

Assembly New York: In L.A.

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Assembly New York's Collaboration with Perfect 69

Before establishing his Lower East Side store and CFDA short-listed line, Assembly, as a bastion of downtown cool, designer Greg Armas was an L.A. boy. “This was my first client base, my first audience, the first place I started the conversation with art and commerce and fashion,” explained Armas. “But since opening Assembly five years ago, I haven’t had much presence here.”

That’s about to change. Tomorrow, Armas returns to his creative origins with the opening of a three-week-long pop-up shop co-curated by denim-heavy label Perfect 69. The store, which is housed in Hollywood’s Space 15 Twenty, will feature a host of one-of-a-kind collaborations, all made specifically for the project. “We have denim crumple dresses with eyes from Rowena Sartin, solid-gold jewelry made with 69 from Kathleen Whitaker, beautiful leather bags by Building Block, and lifestyle items—like some amazing bicycles that I brought in from Tokyo called TokyoBike—that take the space beyond clothing,” said Armas.

The designers, artisans, and other collaborators, like local furniture designers Waka Waka, are all expressly under the radar. “The intention was to really bring some of the quiet ones out,” quipped Armas. “We wanted to show people who may not be making everyday sort of clothes, and L.A. is a great environment for that.” Continue Reading “Assembly New York: In L.A.” »

Women’s Assembly, Now In Session

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For several seasons now, girls have been ducking into Assembly New York, Greg Armas’ shop on the Lower East Side, and walking out with pieces from the Assembly menswear collection. Last night, Armas repaid his female fans for their devotion, debuting Assembly New York womenswear to a packed house at the Ludlow Street shop. “I always planned to do women’s, but it was important to me that I establish the Assembly aesthetic with menswear first,” Armas explained at the event. The new womenswear is androgynous and tailored to be slouchy, like the men’s stuff, with nubby knits, floor-length dusters, and raw-finished minimalist blousing executed in a fugue of neutrals. And, as Armas pointed out, there was no shortage of trousers either. “We’ve got three different styles out there,” he said, indicating the catwalk set up for the evening. “It seemed like trousers were the most interesting way of investigating masculinity for women.”

Photo: Margo Ducharme

Jewelry Designers Grab Piece Of Fashion Week Action

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The era of the It bag is over. The reign of the outfit-dominating shoe is, I suspect, on the wane. So, prepare yourself, fashion fiends, for the jewelry moment: There’s no better evidence that bijoux is the new king—queen?—of all accessories than the fact that two jewelry designers, Pamela Love and Arielle de Pinto, are planning stand-alone presentations at New York fashion week in September. (And meanwhile, designers such as Bliss Lau, Philip Crangi, and Eddie Borgo are prepping jewelry collaborations as eagerly anticipated as the ready-to-wear collections with which they’ll be shown.) Love is readying an installation at Milk Studios; de Pinto is planning a presentation/party downtown with Assembly owner Greg Armas. Both designers cop to the challenge of giving jewelry its due in a fashion week-friendly format. “It’s tough, because jewelry is so small,” notes Pinto. “It wants to be seen up close. Even my showpieces are hard to display well in a big space, where you figure there’s going to be a crowd. I’d like to do something like put my pieces on dancers and have them do a choreographed routine, but I’m still brainstorming.” Love, for her part, is seizing the opportunity given her by Milk and venue sponsor MAC Cosmetics to create an environment specific to her new collection. “I love working with other designers,” notes Love, “but it’s refreshing to be able to show the pieces that I’ve created for myself. And plus, my background is painting and set design,” she adds, “so anytime someone gives me the chance to build something, I’m like, yeah.” Two almost makes a trend—but we’re guessing it won’t be long before other jewelry designers decide to step off the runway and into the limelight.

Photo: Courtesy of Arielle Depinto