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August 27 2014

styledotcom Central Saint Martins debuts its second issue of 1 Granary: stylem.ag/1pgVHzh pic.twitter.com/SPvNPHlbXe

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3 posts tagged "Hanna Liden"

A New Reformation Period  

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The Lower East Side-based shop Reformation debuted an expanded store space on Ludlow Street this summer. Next week, Reformation will celebrate the launch of its Web site, TheReformation.com, with host Zoë Kravitz. For the occasion, artists Nate Lowman, Hanna Liden, Leo Fitzpatrick, and Adam McEwen designed funky, limited-edition T-shirts to benefit Grow NYC. Reformation gave the artists total creative control of the shirt designs, simply asking them to create something that expressed the artists’ current state of mind. Here, Style.com has the exclusive first glimpse of the shirts before they go on sale on TheReformation.com on October 26.

Photos: Leo Fitzpatrick

Canvassing The Web

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Soon you, too, can own a Richard Phillips—even if you can’t afford his usual six-figure prices. The new Exhibition A (members’ only, technically, but with open registration) offers editions, printed on canvas, of works by artists like Phillips (whose Spectrum painting famously reached a new audience recently after appearing on Gossip Girl), Hanna Liden, and Terence Koh—for between $100 and $500. Gallerist Bill Powers (left, with wife Cynthia Rowley), who co-founded the site, explained that his goal was to help turn young art appreciators into bona fide collectors. “Really the idea sprung up because of my niece who goes to Cal Arts,” he explained. “It’s affordable enough that she can buy something. And it can be a point of entry for new collectors. Sometimes people don’t know how to get started.”

Powers, who currently runs Half Gallery in the city, teamed with Rowley, Laura Martin, and Gabby Munoz on the project. The key to the low prices isn’t the membership (signing up is gratis), but rather the unique open-edition format: Works are available for sale for a limited time rather than by numbered edition, which also keeps the artists’ galleries happy. For the opening, participants like Liden, Phillips, Rene Ricard, and photographer Mark Borthwick (designer Maria Cornejo’s other half) all made the rounds. “Bill chose the canvases, which worked out perfectly for me,” Borthwick said of his pieces, available now on the site. “I’m a typical Libra. I don’t ever wish to choose.” Those willing to wait it out until the new year will have even more options, including pieces by Jim Drain, Olivier Zahm, and Terence Koh. Koh, in typical enfant terrible form, riffed off his notorious Big White Cock (a white neon light in the shape of a rooster) by screening the outline onto black canvas.

If it wasn’t your usual fashion crowd, designer Cynthia Rowley felt right at home with the industry crossover. “Before I was ever in fashion, I was in art schoolᾹI was a painter,” she said. “Now I draw mostly. But doing things like this…it’s like getting to hang out with all my friends.”

Photo: Joe Schildhorn/BFAnyc.com

Curtains Up At New York’s
Newest Gallery Of Note

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New York’s newest gallery, Algus Greenspon, is a bona fide labor of love—emphasis on labor. It’s been two years in the works, and only a few months ago, co-founder and director Amy Greenspon (who will run the gallery with Mitchell Algus) was referring to the Morton Street space as “the puddle,” thanks to the poky pace of construction. Luckily, she had supportive friends to ease her along. “I didn’t have much to do with it,” pal Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler demurred. “But I’d ride my bike over after work and we’d sit in the space and drink a bottle of wine.”

He was only one of the many friendly faces on hand for the grand opening last night. Hernandez and Jack McCollough, Kai Kühne, artists Nate Lowman and Hanna Liden, and gallerists Kelly Taxter and Pascal Spengemann were all there to see the opening show, a retrospective of the work of Gene Beery (pictured). Artist/performer/gallerina Emily Sundblad even performed a few songs for the occasion. (“Pure bliss,” was Kühne’s verdict.) All in all, a bang-up opening—and a testament to the power of word of mouth. “I’m a technological disaster,” Greenspon said. “So apparently not a soul received the e-mail invite I sent. I’m so happy the word got out, or it would have been Emily singing her heart out for Mitchell, me, and Michael, the mouse that comes out at night.” And luckily for revelers, Michael didn’t end up making an appearance.
Algus Greenspon, 71 Morton Street, NYC, (212) 255-7874, www.algusgreenspon.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Algus Greenspon