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July 25 2014

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32 posts tagged "Hanne Gaby Odiele"

Insta-Gratification

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. See below for today’s top shots.

Wednesday, February 5

From four eyes back to two.

Marina’s #NYFW mantra.

Ahhh! Real monsters.

It may not be Thursday, but we couldn’t resist this throwback.

Pusha T pushing tees on Marcelo Burlon. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification” »

In the MomentCam With Grace Mahary

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Grace Mahary

Wondering how models keep themselves entertained backstage during hours of hair and makeup? Grace Mahary, who recently shared her fashion week essentials with Style.com, is “currently obsessed” with MomentCam, a new photo-editing app that transforms camera pictures into fun, unpredictable caricatures. Along with a sketchy selfie (above), Mahary sent along several tongue-in-cheek portraits of fellow catwalkers, including Caroline Brasch Nielsen, Xiao Wen Ju, Tilda Lindstam, and Hanne Gaby Odiele (below). Over the next month, we’re hoping to see more MomentCam creations starring industry regulars. Could you imagine a cartoon Karl, Alber, or Pat McGrath? The possibilities are endless.

MomentCam is available at the iTunes App Store. Visit www.itunes.com.

model cartoons

Photos: MomentCam Courtesy of Grace Mahary

i-D Ups Its Online Game

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i-D

Last week, i-D rolled out its eye-popping new Web site, i-d.co. Having launched with a collaborative M.I.A. x Kenzo music video, the iconic magazine’s new online home will offer full-bleed imagery, quirky videos starring personalities such as Rick Owens, Lily McMenamy, Sky Ferreira, and more, and, soon, an interactive social-media component. The Web venture, which was feted at a veritable runway rave in New York last night, is a decidedly high-tech move for the publication, which, founded by Terry Jones in 1980, earned cult status because of its gritty fanzine approach to documenting London’s creative culture. Of course, it also helped that, early in their careers, photographers such as Nick Knight, Mario Testino, and Juergen Teller shot for the publication, and Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and even Madonna winked for its covers in their youth.

The site is thanks in part to Vice—the forward-thinking, in-your-face, Brooklyn-based media company that acquired i-D last December. “Vice’s whole push was to take i-D into the digital realm, which it wasn’t. We had a Web site, but it’s nothing like what we have now,” offered i-D editor Holly Shackleton. “Vice has been incredibly respectful. They haven’t been involved in our editorial choices,” she added. “They’ve just given us the digital know-how and business sense to start something new and launch the site.” More developments are on the horizon. i-D will soon open an office here in New York, and Jones, who’s been with the publication for the past thirty-three years, will take a notable step back. “He’ll always be on the masthead as founder,” offered Shackleton, stressing that while he’ll still be somewhat involved, he’s looking to spend more time with his family.

The Web site’s launch party in West Chelsea was a fitting display of fresh, edgy clothes and pioneering technology. In partnership with Samsung, the magazine flew over three of London’s hottest new talents—Ryan LO, Claire Barrow, and Ashley Williams (all Fashion East alums)—and had them present their collections in a holographic show. It was one-part IRL models (including Hanne Gaby Odiele), one-part virtual projections. Audience members (M.I.A. among them) could hardly tell who was real and who was simulated as the catwalkers danced amid computer-generated acid rain and floating gemstones. The crowd bounced and, at some points, fist-pumped to the EDM runway tunes. And even though partygoers were sipping champagne, the event exuded the underground cool that made i-D a force in the first place. “i-D has always been a global fashion community, and we hope the new site will encourage that,” said Shackleton. “We wanted to introduce these young British talents to a New York audience. They’re all future stars, without a doubt.”

Take a look at i-D‘s new online digs at www.i-d.vice.com.

Photo: Laura June Kirsch

Jumping on the Bandanna Bandwagon

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A bandana look from Louis VuittonWorn by cowboys, bandits, protesters, punks, and hip-hoppers alike, bandannas have earned a rebellious rep over the years. This summer, fashion has latched onto the rule-breaking look. Perennial street-style favorite Hanne Gaby Odiele pioneered the trend back in February, when she was snapped sporting a standard-issue black kerchief on multiple occasions in Paris. Since then, designers have taken up hankies, too. Andreas Melbostad’s recent Resort collection for Diesel Black Gold included a graphic black-and-white print that resembled, as he put it, an “aggressive bandanna.” And at the menswear shows at the end of last month, Kim Jones featured the classic paisley motif in his Louis Vuitton lineup, while Hedi Slimane sent models rocking rockabilly red scarves down the Saint Laurent runway. They were big with the street-style set, too.

Here, a slideshow of our favorite bandana looks.

Riding Dirty

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Louise du Toit wearing a shirt from Acne's capsule collectionAcne Studios has rarely met an out-of-the-box idea it hasn’t liked. So though for most labels, publishing its own limited-edition collection of rodeo-rider portraits from a mid-century physique photographer wouldn’t be the first order of business, here it is. And so last night, with its usual clutch of models in tow—Hanne Gaby Odiele, Jacquelyn Jablonski, Ji Hye Park, et al.—Acne launched Rodeo, a hardbound book of photos from the collection of New Yorker critic Vince Aletti. Must be something in the air lately. As Hedi Slimane’s latest editorial suggested: Cowboys—they’re a thing.

 

Bruce of Los Angeles, little-known except among physique-photo aficionados, has nevertheless been influential among later photographers. Aletti traced elements of his style in the work of Mapplethorpe, Herb Ritts, and Bruce Weber. (The similarities were in some cases so striking, you could probably have bylined the book Bruce of Los Weber.) “It’s clear that he’s looked at it and had some appreciation of this period of work,” Aletti said between tête-à-têtes with Fran Lebowitz last night. “And I’d imagine he knows [of] some other photographer named Bruce.”

 

Unlike much of the photographer’s oeuvre, these rodeo shots are naturalistic, of real guys (rather than models) in their own clothes (rather than nude). Of course, exceptions apply. In any case, Acne took the opportunity to create a little capsule collection of clothes around them, too, for those who prefer to wear, rather than page through, their vintage beefcake. There are T-shirts, glammy cowboy boots stitched with appliqués of cowboys, and the traffic-stopping shirt modeled last night by the label’s Louise du Toit, available at Acne shops now.

Photo: Courtesy of Acne