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July 25 2014

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59 posts tagged "Hedi Slimane"

Californication

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Californication From the streets of New York to the Paris ateliers, fashion is in a California state of mind. For proof, look at all the references to West Coast skate, surf, rave, grunge, and lowrider subcultures on the Spring ’14 runways. Hedi Slimane, who was fetishizing Los Angeles and its underground scenes long before he landed at Saint Laurent, is at least partly responsible for this mass migration, but Kate and Laura Mulleavy deserve credit, too. After taking us “back home to Santa Cruz” last season, the Rodarte sisters’ L.A.-inspired lineup was full of chola-girl plaid shirts styled with snapbacks, satin bras, studded suspenders, and fringed skirts. Tommy Hilfiger, meanwhile, transformed Pier 94 into an epic beachscape with a boardwalk runway that complemented his sun-kissed, sporty clothes; Humberto Leon and Carol Lim channeled SoCal street racing at Opening Ceremony; and Jeremy Laing described his Spring collection as “Malibu Beach Barbie goes to a rave.”

Here, a slideshow of our favorite California-inspired Spring looks.

Jean Paul Gaultier: “My Purpose Is Not To Shock”

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Jean Paul Gaultier by Andy WarholThough perhaps an enfant no more, Jean Paul Gaultier’s long-standing reputation as one of fashion’s enfants terribles hardly jives with the concept of a traditional museum retrospective. In fact, Gaultier himself finds it hard to imagine his designs in such a setting. “I am from the generation where, when I saw an exhibition of someone’s work, they were dead!” he told us. “I think I am still alive, and I never in my dreams thought that a museum could be interested in the work I’m doing.”

However, judging by the buzz around The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, both museums and the masses are keen on a comprehensive showcase of the designer’s work. And, having bowed in 2011 at the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, this traveling exhibition is, of course, anything but ordinary. Set to make its East Coast debut at the Brooklyn Museum this Friday, the Thierry-Maxime Loriot-curated show offers a look at Gaultier’s career through the lens of his fixations, from punk rock to corsetry to his many muses. Animated faces (including the visage of Gaultier himself, which is paired with his signature Breton shirt) are projected on many of the show’s mannequins. Elsewhere, S&M-inspired gear is shown in stacked booths reminiscent of a red light district. Ahead of the New York opening, Style.com caught up with the master himself to talk reality television, haute couture, and his career as an accidental provocateur.

When you were initially approached about having an exhibition, did you ever feel any reluctance?
At the beginning, yes. I refused. For me, it was truly for dead people. But after meeting the team at the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, I thought, “Ah! Maybe we can do something that is not dead.” It’s nice because it’s a new adventure and it’s not one fixed, chronological exhibition. I did not want it by color or year. I prefer to group the clothes by the things that I’m obsessed with, or the things that are important to me, with different periods mixed together.

Your Spring ’14 runway show took inspiration from both Dancing With the Stars and Grease. Has your relationship with pop culture changed over the years?
I have always been impressed by rock culture, rock shows, people like Mick Jagger, David Bowie, and the New York Dolls—all that influenced me. I look a lot at TV, even trashy programs, reality TV sometimes, and love the contests like Dancing With the Stars. I think I am a little American that way! It’s super interesting, psychologically, and I love performance. Continue Reading “Jean Paul Gaultier: “My Purpose Is Not To Shock”” »

Lip Service

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Spring '14 lips

Pucker up, kiddos. Smooches abounded on the Spring ’14 runways, making their mark everywhere from Peter Jensen, where frocks and tops were covered with photo-realistic lips, to Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, who crafted a pair of sunglasses with gilded gobs for lenses. The gap-toothed pink and purple pouts that appeared on a series of looks at Giles Deacon were rumored to be an ode to stylist Katie Grand’s grin. Meanwhile, Saint Laurent‘s Hedi Slimane doused an 80s-tinged ruffle top and short black wrap dress with an allover rouge lip print. Inspired by Yves Saint Laurent’s 1971 Vichy Chic collection, the smackers were a somewhat surprising embrace of the house’s history. Tucker’s Gaby Basora employed the motif, too. The New York-based designer collaborated with Solange Azagury-Partridge—best known for her “Hot Lips” baubles—on rosebud blouses and dresses strewn with fuchsia kissers.

If mouthy accessories are more your taste, look no further than Yaz Bukey’s Spring ’14 range. The designer served up a patent cherry bouche bag—as well as a pair of lipstick-shaped earrings for touch-ups. And even on the street, showgoers were donning mouth-embellished duds. Tommy Ton snapped one femme in Paris wearing surreal black driving gloves fit for Dali—the wrists sealed with two bright red kisses.

Rocker Liza Thorn Is Fashion’s “High Priestess”

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Liza Thorn Somewhere between psychedelic, street, and old-school grunge lies High Priestess, a collaborative limited-edition capsule from Lindsey Thornburg (a bohemian New York designer known for her sumptuous cloaks) and streetwear label Obesity and Speed’s Lyz Olko. “We’ve known each other a really really long time,” said Olko about her partner in sartorial crime, adding that it dawned upon them to collaborate while sitting around a bonfire at a friend’s wedding in Santa Barbara earlier this year. “We have really similar aesthetics and this was the perfect merging of our styles. I guess she’s a little more ‘witchy’ and I’m a little more ‘urban street,’ but together, it really works.”

The resulting range comprises hand-shredded denim shorts and jackets, destroyed T-shirts and tanks, printed “Don’t Exist” tops that have been dipped in water so the lettering runs (one of Olko’s favorites), and a raw silk bomber jacket with “High Priestess” embroidered across the back. “We just thought it made sense,” explained Olko when asked about the title. “It’s definitely kind of trippy, but at the same time, it’s super feminine and regal.”

Liza Thorn

And who better to represent this gritty queen than Starred’s front woman (and Hedi Slimane muse-cum-campaign face) Liza Thorn? “Her voice is like a saint’s, and she’s hypnotic in a way—her personality and her music really suit the capsule, and she’s super seventies hippie rock ‘n’ roll,” said Olko, who met the musician a while back through her pal, the Misshapes’ Greg Krelenstein. “Since we were already friends, I called her up and told her that she’d be perfect for this collaboration and she was like, ‘I’m so down,’” recalled Olko. “And then she said, ‘Actually, randomly, I just shot this Saint Laurent thing for Hedi [Slimane], too.’ And I was like whoa, that’s crazy! That’s a big deal. That’s like, huge.”

The girls didn’t let it go to their heads, though. According to Olko, the shoot, which was lensed by her old friend Jason Nocito, was laid-back, and largely styled by Thorn. “Nothing was pre-planned. We all just hung out in the dressing room and it worked out beautifully,” said Olko. The images debut exclusively here. As for the collection (priced between $70 and $395 and hitting stores like OAK, bonadrag.com, and American Two Shot, as well as obesityandspeed.com and lindseythornburg.com, the first week of September), Olko offered, “This is one of my favorite things that I’ve done so far. And I hope people get that there’s a story behind everything that we made. It’s not just a T-shirt. It’s more than that.”

Photo: Jason Nocito

Chunky Necklaces Are at the Top of the Fashion Food Chain

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Chains at ChanelThanks to the tastemaking powers of Nicolas Ghesquière and Gaia Repossi, five-fingered rings and tough ear cuffs have been all the rage for the past year or so. But judging from the recent Resort collections, the new jewelry must-have is a chunky chain. We spied statement-making metal necklaces that were equal parts punk and hip-hop bling at Chanel, Bottega Veneta, Givenchy, and Lanvin, among others. Jenni Kayne, for her part, piled on the gold strands for an extra dose of swag (let’s just say that Jay-Z himself would be jealous), while Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing, Bouchra Jarrar, and Hedi Slimane at Saint Laurent incorporated gleaming links as accents on their clothes. In addition to Rihanna, whose Céline ID choker has been in heavy rotation for some time now, cool girls such as Caroline de Maigret have taken a new liking to heavy-duty chokers. We’re betting they’ll be street-style status symbols at the Spring ’14 shows.

Here, a slide show of our favorite chains.