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13 posts tagged "Helmut Newton"

Violeta Sanchez’s Adventures in Le Smoking

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Violeta and Luz SanchezFrench actress Violeta Sanchez, muse to Yves Saint Laurent and Helmut Newton, is bringing her story full circle. On Saturday, she will don a tux to present the Atelier Pallas Fall ’14 collection of made-to-order smokings and smoking-inspired jackets and dresses. And it will be a family affair, as Sanchez’s 15 year-old daughter, Luz, will model the pieces. It’s a nice display symmetry, as Sanchez’s own adventures in fashion started with a tuxedo.

“When I first started out, I spent all my time at the cinema. My ideal was Marlene Dietrich in menswear, so when I got my first paycheck, I ordered a smoking from a tailor in the eighth arrondissement. He came recommended by Paloma Picasso, who was doing our set and costumes,” she recalled the other day in the Pallas atelier in Paris’ ninth district. “He had never worked with a woman before, let alone one who was not yet 20, so he really threw his heart into it.”

Sanchez proudly wore that tux to her first premiere, the aptly-named play Succès. At the dinner that followed, she found herself seated with Saint Laurent and Newton. “I knew little about fashion, or Vogue, or Newton, or anything,” she admitted. But by evening’s end, Sanchez had two new friends and had made a promise for a shoot. Within days, she appeared on the Saint Laurent couture runway. “I didn’t fit the type of the time, so that story really started with a chance meeting that transformed and became something else.” It’s not so much a fashion story, she noted, than one about how what you wear can change your life.

Despite her many years with Saint Laurent, the smoking designed for her by Atelier Pallas owners Daniel Pallas and Véronique Bousquet is only the second Sanchez has ever owned (she still wears the original). “When I saw the atelier, I realized how much I missed that world. When I tried it on, I was hooked,” she laughed. “It was all really simple. I wanted to bring my story to theirs, out of conviction.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Pirelli Celebrates 50 With A Little History

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Helmut Newton for Pirelli

The Pirelli Calendar turns 50 in 2014. To celebrate, the tire company execs have decided not to create a new edition. Rather, they’re releasing a previously unpublished version, originally slated for 1986, shot in Tuscany and Monte Carlo by none other than the prolific Helmut Newton.

First, some backstory: The calendar has become a mainstay marketing tool for a company that would otherwise have no real link to the überglam sphere of fashion photography (think: Herb Ritts’ 1991 edit, photographed in the Bahamas with the likes of Cindy Crawford and Kate Moss, or Norman Parkinson’s 1985 datebook with Iman in Edinburgh).

Helmut Newton for Pirelli

It’s with some irony, then, that Newton’s commission was the first to feature direct Pirelli product placement. Prior to 1986, the only connection to the company’s goods was vague (tire tracks seen in Uwe Ommer’s 1984 calendar, for example). When tasked to feature Pirelli’s wheels front and center, Newton eagerly embraced the challenge. The images are chock-full of horsepower.

Pirelli didn’t stop there. The brand commissioned former Pirelli sharpshooters Peter Lindbergh and Patrick Demarchelier to snap a “celebratory” lineup of such models as Karolina Kurkova and Alek Wek, and organized a retrospective, which will be held in the company’s HangarBicocca venue in Milan. The latter will showcase the work of the thirty-plus photographers who have contributed to the calendar over the years.

Photos: Helmut Newton, Courtesy of Pirelli

Ushering in a New Era of The Fashion Book

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The Fashion Book

Fifteen years ago, Phaidon published The Fashion Book. As its title suggests, the book quickly became the definitive resource for the fashion curious and industry mainstay alike—an A-to-Z guide to the field’s central influencers, with pages devoted to everyone from Vivienne Westwood and Helmut Newton to Oscar Wilde. Last night at Topshop in Soho, Phaidon celebrated the release of an updated version of The Fashion Book. The tome features seventy-two fresh entries (Style.com among them), and boasts pages devoted to individuals such as Nicolas Ghesquière, Tilda Swinton, and others.

The fete’s main event was a panel discussion moderated by Parsons the New School for Design’s dean, Simon Collins. It included Vera Wang, Iris Apfel, and our very own Dirk Standen. The group focused on what it means to be iconic (“Being an icon implies a very distinct point of view, which is rather rare today,” said Apfel), the figures who inspire them (“It’s people who never really sold out, someone like Peter Saville,” said Standen), and, in reference to Rick Owens’ recent statement-making show, what it means for an icon to change and evolve. On that topic, Wang offered, “Mr. Lagerfeld said to me once, ‘Vera, if you really can’t change and you can’t go with the times and you can’t realize how the world is becoming a different place, then it’s time for you to leave.’ So it’s somewhere between that fine line of adapting every decade and sticking to what you believe in and furthering your craft.” It was an honest and up-front dialogue about the connotations of holding influence in the industry today—a fitting prelude to The Fashion Book of the millennial era.

The Fashion Book New Edition, $59.95, will be available from Phaidon beginning October 14.

Photo: Courtesy of Phaidon Press

Newton On Display in L.A.

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Villa d’ Este, Lake Como, Italy from the series White Women April 1975

“I’m not looking for a nice girl,” Helmut Newton once said. In lieu of the angular subjects that were the fashion convention in the forties when Newton began his career, the photographer sought out busty, broad-shouldered women—often blondes—whom he’d photograph in black and white, at high noon, and preferably in the nude. He rendered his muses as strong, dominant protagonists in his erotic, visual narratives, which flirted with sadomasochism. More than 100 of his subversive images are now on display at Los Angeles’ Annenberg Space for Photography. Opening to the public on Saturday, Helmut Newton: White Women • Sleepless Nights • Big Nudes comprises works from his first three books. One photograph from the seventies, “Chained Nude,” shows a model wearing only a pair of cherry-red stilettos and chains around her ankles, while another, particularly iconic shot, depicts two women—one nude, one in a black tuxedo—sharing a passionate kiss.

Continue Reading “Newton On Display in L.A.” »

Kristen McMenamy Through The Years

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As the self-proclaimed “first weird-looking model,” Kristen McMenamy has broken just about every rule there is during her thirty years (and counting) in fashion, which exactly is why we chose to profile her in the new issue of Style.com/Print. Throughout her career, the irreverent icon became renowned for her androgynous appeal, eccentric personality, madwoman-on-a-mission runway walk, and willingness to sacrifice life and limb in pursuit of the elusive perfect picture.

McMenamy was a fixture in the glossies during her nineties heyday (back then, her cropped hair, shaved eyebrows, unconventional features, and sinewy frame made her an ideal poster girl for the grunge movement); she has shot with the likes of Steven Meisel, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Juergen Teller, and Nick Knight, who took the pared-down portraits of her that run in Style.com/Print. Along the way, she has cultivated a support system of designers. “If fashion is her family, then Donatella Versace is her big sister,” writes Jo-Ann Furniss in her profile. That makes Karl Lagerfeld McMenamy’s proverbial father. Lagerfeld did, after all, walk her down the aisle at her ’99 wedding to photographer Miles Aldridge, in addition to casting her in a multitude of campaigns and runway shows.

See them all in our slideshow roundup of McMenamy’s career highlights >