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July 26 2014

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68 posts tagged "Hermes"

Mulberry CEO Steps Down

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Cara Delevingne and Bruno Guillon at MulberryAfter two years as the CEO of British luxury house Mulberry, Bruno Guillon has stepped down amid sales troubles, reports WWD. Guillon, who was previously the managing director of Hermès, helped heighten Mulberry’s profile during his tenure via star-studded front rows and a slew of It bags. Mulberry’s non-executive chairman and former CEO Godfrey Davis will fill Guillon’s shoes until a successor is found. Guillon’s departure comes nine months after the brand’s former creative director, Emma Hill, announced her resignation. Her successor, too, has yet to be named.

Photo: Getty Images 

Brian Lichtenberg: Beyond the T-shirt

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Brian Lichtenberg

Mention Los Angeles-based designer Brian Lichtenberg and two things come to mind. The first, of course, is his line of cheeky, logo-tweaked T-shirts, in which Hermès becomes Homiés, Celine transforms to Feline, and Balmain is swapped for Ballin’. Rihanna wears them. Miley Cyrus is a fan. And they’re sold at such highbrow retailers as Net-a-Porter, Colette, and Browns of London. For those with a slightly longer celeb-fashion memory, Lichtenberg is also a ready-to-wear designer known for some very high-voltage body-con dresses.

He let his ready-to-wear line go when the T-shirts picked up. “It’s a small team that I’m working with,” Lichtenberg explained. “It’s growing, but in the beginning, when it became all about the sweatshirts, the T-shirts, the beanies, the hoodies, it was like we really only had to focus on that or it wasn’t going to get made.” But this evening at The Hub at the Hudson Hotel, Lichtenberg relaunched his now-several-seasons-dormant luxury collection. “It was like, OK, I can keep doing this and not do any more dresses or leggings and just kind of be known as another L.A. sportswear designer,” Lichtenberg related from the couch in the Hudson’s lounge. “But I [wouldn't have been able to] live with myself. I want to do my dresses. I want to do the patchwork and the fun editorial moments. It’s in my blood.”

The collection, of which Lichtenberg gave us an exclusive preview, is a motocross-inspired compilation of mesh, spandex, and fishnet patched leggings; sexed-up bandage dresses; and lambskin leather drop pants (for both girls and guys). A fox fur taupe jacket and more than a few transparent lace and leather evening crop tops make it clear: This is not for a shy client.

The line—first inspired by a pair of vintage moto pants Lichtenberg found at a thrift store (“I love thrift shopping and I love just going to the Rose Bowl and shopping for ripped-up T-shirts,” he said)—is not without its tongue-in-cheek elements. A red-and-white men’s sweatshirt reads “Lichtenboro” in place of Marlboro, while a casual tee is printed with “Be Licked” as a stand-in for Bud Light. “It started with those pants, then it got me into the patchwork of the legs and doing the dresses and also kind of a white-trash element,” Lichtenberg said. “‘Be Licked’ is just a throwback to smoking and beer and all that kind of stuff.”

The designer hopes that fans of his T-shirts will embrace his ready-to-wear. It’s for somebody “who doesn’t take fashion too seriously, but loves to dress up,” Lichtenberg explained. “A free spirit.”

Photo: Getty Images

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

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Alexander Wang

ALTUZARRA
Strong showing from Joseph Altuzarra, I thought. A lot of young New York designers are all over the place, but Joseph seems to be settling into a nice rhythm, with an identifiable signature but also a sense of variation and development each season. The mood of luxe coziness reminded me a bit of the Hermès Fall 2013 show. A few designers have been taking their cues from that collection lately. As they should. It keeps getting better in the memory.

MONCLER GRENOBLE
The staging was…well, I’ll let Maya Singer explain. Afterward, the show’s producer, Etienne Russo, who routinely orchestrates some of fashion’s most memorable spectacles, told me that the existential dread that came over you watching the interminable German acapella performance was all part of the plan. He intended it as an antidote to our instant gratification culture. And they say fashion is shallow…

ALEXANDER WANG
This wasn’t my favorite Alex Wang show ever, but I got the sense that the crowd—particularly the European contingent—liked it a lot. And you can see why. In a city that gets knocked for playing it safe fashion-wise, Wang stands out for the scale of his ambition, evident in the staging, the clothes, and even in the ballsy decision to show in Brooklyn. Now let’s see some more of that ballsiness at Balenciaga, please.

MONCLER DINNER
The Italian label held a chic postshow dinner at Sean MacPherson’s newish hotel, The Marlton. How chic? Well, at the company’s request, there were no party photographers present. If this catches on, that should cause some existential angst among the fashion set. Gian Luca Passi de Preposulo, the urbane, intelligent Moncler executive, introduced us with maximum casualness to his date: “This is my girl Jessica.” That would be Chastain.

UNDER THE RADAR
Patrick Li, that unabashed logo vandalizer and discerning creative director of T Magazine, thinks more people should be paying attention to A Détacher. He’s right.

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

GUM Celebrates 120 Years in the Red Square, With Or Without Vuitton Luggage

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GUM

There’s more to Moscow’s Red Square than the Kremlin, Saint Basil’s Cathedral, and Lenin’s tomb—for more than a century, it’s been home to GUM (short for Gosudarstvennyi Universalnyi Magasin, or Main Universal Store in English), Russia’s gigantic three-level, glass-domed department store, which celebrated its 120th anniversary last night.

GUM has had a long and often starry line of admirers over its century-plus in business. Tolstoy and Tchaikovsky bought their Patek Philippe watches there. It has survived closures (and opponents, like Stalin, who reportedly hated it), but has always come back. Ten years ago, Bosco di Ciliegi took over the monumental store and restored GUM’s nearly 300,000 square feet to its nineteenth-century splendor. That 19th century splendor is now home to some very 21st century luxury brands, including Dior, Hermès, Giorgio Armani, and Louis Vuitton. Tiffany & Co. is set to arrive next year.

Inside GUM

Much of the media coverage has centered on the fate of the giant Vuitton trunk that the label erected out in the Red Square, where the brand was planning to house its Soul of Travel exhibition. After protests from the Kremlin, it is now being dismantled and removed. (Vuitton plans to hold the exhibition elsewhere as soon as possible.) But the political brouhaha didn’t dampen GUM’s birthday mood. The retail center set up a rustic outdoor Christmas fair and staged a period costume party on its Red Square ice rink, which recalled the days of the tsars. Guests sipped hot mulled wine in the snow and snacked on Russian dumplings and crepes with salmon. Revelers even had the chance to mint their own GUM anniversary coins before indulging in the mammoth birthday cake and taking to the ice where a brass band played.

As the fashion on offer in Moscow remains alarmingly pricey due to Russia’s notably high import tax, the best luxury bet at GUM may be the store’s legendary ice cream. Despite the frigid temperatures, there were hordes of people waiting in line for some of the frozen treats. As Winston Churchill once put it, “You cannot defeat a nation that enjoys ice cream at minus-40 degrees C.”

Jean Paul Gaultier: “My Purpose Is Not To Shock”

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Jean Paul Gaultier by Andy WarholThough perhaps an enfant no more, Jean Paul Gaultier’s long-standing reputation as one of fashion’s enfants terribles hardly jives with the concept of a traditional museum retrospective. In fact, Gaultier himself finds it hard to imagine his designs in such a setting. “I am from the generation where, when I saw an exhibition of someone’s work, they were dead!” he told us. “I think I am still alive, and I never in my dreams thought that a museum could be interested in the work I’m doing.”

However, judging by the buzz around The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, both museums and the masses are keen on a comprehensive showcase of the designer’s work. And, having bowed in 2011 at the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, this traveling exhibition is, of course, anything but ordinary. Set to make its East Coast debut at the Brooklyn Museum this Friday, the Thierry-Maxime Loriot-curated show offers a look at Gaultier’s career through the lens of his fixations, from punk rock to corsetry to his many muses. Animated faces (including the visage of Gaultier himself, which is paired with his signature Breton shirt) are projected on many of the show’s mannequins. Elsewhere, S&M-inspired gear is shown in stacked booths reminiscent of a red light district. Ahead of the New York opening, Style.com caught up with the master himself to talk reality television, haute couture, and his career as an accidental provocateur.

When you were initially approached about having an exhibition, did you ever feel any reluctance?
At the beginning, yes. I refused. For me, it was truly for dead people. But after meeting the team at the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, I thought, “Ah! Maybe we can do something that is not dead.” It’s nice because it’s a new adventure and it’s not one fixed, chronological exhibition. I did not want it by color or year. I prefer to group the clothes by the things that I’m obsessed with, or the things that are important to me, with different periods mixed together.

Your Spring ’14 runway show took inspiration from both Dancing With the Stars and Grease. Has your relationship with pop culture changed over the years?
I have always been impressed by rock culture, rock shows, people like Mick Jagger, David Bowie, and the New York Dolls—all that influenced me. I look a lot at TV, even trashy programs, reality TV sometimes, and love the contests like Dancing With the Stars. I think I am a little American that way! It’s super interesting, psychologically, and I love performance. Continue Reading “Jean Paul Gaultier: “My Purpose Is Not To Shock”” »