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July 22 2014

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9 posts tagged "Hilary Swank"

First Karl, Now Cannes: Creatives Can’t Get Enough of the Old West

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Chanel Dallas

It’s time to head West—cinematically speaking, at least. Next month’s Cannes Film Festival lineup includes a surprising number of Westerns, including The Homesman, starring Meryl Streep, Tommy Lee Jones, and Hilary Swank (and co-written and directed by Jones), and Deux Jours, Une Nuit, a “Belgian Western” starring Marion Cotillard. We won’t attempt to explain how or why the world’s top filmmakers became collectively inspired by Western stories, but we will say this: From a stylistic standpoint, it makes perfect sense. Consider the recent obsession with all things Americana, a subject our editor in chief detailed in our latest issue of Style.com/Print. And of course, there was the Chanel Metiers d’Arts show in Dallas last December, in which models stomped down a hay-strewn runway in leather fringe, big gallon hats, and Native American motifs. It was the show that sparked a thousand Instagrams and had even the most discerning editors rethinking cowboy boots. As usual, Chanel was ahead of something huge. We’re curious to see if these new films at Cannes encourage a similar surge of interest in old-school American culture.

Photo: Getty Images 

Michael Kors: “Fashion Is An Athletic Competition”

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Michael KorsToday, Michael Kors will join the ranks of Karl Lagerfeld, Dries Van Noten, and Oscar de la Renta when he accepts his Award for Artistry of Fashion from the Couture Council of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Though the man, who has created one of fashion’s largest empires with his namesake American sportswear label, hardly needs an introduction, Hilary Swank will be on hand at the Lincoln Center luncheon to properly present him with the honor. Style.com caught up with Kors to talk about fashion as a sport, triple shoulder pads, and more. And no, in case you were wondering, even a pro like Kors is not ready for fashion week. “You know, we are never ready until five minutes before the show,” Kors told us. “But that’s the way it is.”

You’ve been designing for over thirty years. Do you still find fashion exciting?
This morning, I was watching that swimmer Diana [Nyad] who is 64 years old, and she really had the endurance to keep trying and keep persevering. Fashion is an athletic competition and you have to have endurance and you have to stay excited about the idea that things are always changing. The world always changes, therefore fashion changes. I am excited about the fact that no matter how many years I have been doing it, you never know all the rules. You never know exactly what the game is going to be because the game is always changing.

What have been the most interesting changes you have seen in fashion during the course of your career?
There are three changes that have rocked fashion and continue to do so. Number one is the internet. Fashion became accessible quickly and 24/7 to anyone who was interested all around the planet. Clothes used to be very specific by country. The introduction of the Web was like when the Berlin Wall fell—it took down the barriers around the world in fashion. Number two, the rules have totally been thrown out the window. No one would have thought that people would be going to parties and fashion shows in February wearing sandals, or that they would wear sequins in the office during the day. Plus, the idea of “dressing your age,” has been totally diminished. In today’s world, if you have amazing legs, you might be a 60-year-old and wearing a short dress. Or, on the other hand, you might be 16 years old and instead of looking girly, you look sophisticated. The biggest change, though, is probably the democratization of fashion. When I started, you had to be wealthy and fashion-obsessed and live in a big city to really feel that there was anything in the fashion game for you. Today, it’s all about a certain taste level, a certain point of view design-wise, and it’s not about the price tag.

You are getting the award from FIT, where you attended school. What was one of the most challenging moments from your time there? I did not grow up sewing. There was no sewing machine in my house. The idea of sitting down and trying to be really exacting at the sewing machine was like an I Love Lucy episode—me sewing turned into Lucy at the chocolate factory. On the other side of the coin, I had been sketching since I was really small. When I arrived at school, they were trying to teach us really rudimentary things [about sketching] and I was like, “I have been doing since I was a 6-year-old.” I was either left back or a genius. I was never in the middle while I was in school. That’s for sure. Continue Reading “Michael Kors: “Fashion Is An Athletic Competition”” »

Bulgari’s New Gem in Saint-Tropez

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Juliette Binoche, Jeremy Irons, and Hilary Swank cut the ribbon at Bulgari's new Saint-Tropez store

Saint-Tropez, the diamond of the French Riviera, shone brightly this week, as Bulgari invited Juliette Binoche, Hilary Swank, Jeremy Irons, Isabella Ferrari, and Bianca Brandolini d’Adda, among others, down for two days of sea, sun, and celebration. The occasion was the unveiling of the jeweler’s new boutique in the resort town, the opening of which kicked off the forty-eight-hour fete on Tuesday night.

Irons, who played a jewel thief with a penchant for Bulgari in Claude Lelouch’s And Now…Ladies and Gentlemen…, mingled with the crowd and even posed for a picture with a local chien. “I love to buy jewelry for other people, to pick out something that I think someone would love,” said the actor, whose hands donned a simple pinkie ring that was his father’s, and paint stains from repairing his boat in Ireland. Meanwhile, Swank offered that, for her, the Saint-Tropez scene evoked images of Picasso. Continue Reading “Bulgari’s New Gem in Saint-Tropez” »

A Berlin Blowout, Courtesy of Hugo Boss

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There’s something to be said for the home-field advantage. When Hugo Boss-—based in Germany—elected to show its Hugo collection at Berlin fashion week, they went for broke, inviting 1,000 guests (including Hilary Swank, Eric Bana, and Ryan Kwanten) for a fashion show, dinner, and party at the Museum Island in the city’s center. Designer Eyan Allen looked back to the future for Spring. He called the collection Poetic Tailoring, but he seemed more to be channeling Star Trek with the sharp, clean lines, and stark palette of starship silver, glacial blue, white, and flame red. Silver lamé leggings and flowing dresses over second-skin white trousers gave a hint of the sixties.

Afterward, the catwalkers of today had no trouble imagining themselves in the goods. Georgia May Jagger, wearing a dress and lipstick in the same arresting red shown on the catwalk, cooed with Leah Woods over a sharp pantsuit worn by Jourdan Dunn. They both congratulated Allen on his bracing palette, too. A different opinion came from a model old enough to remember the sixties the first time around: Veruschka. “I love that Hugo’s clothes are wearable,” she said. “But I would rather wear the menswear, especially the apronlike coverall jackets, because I can’t see many men wearing them and someone should. I especially love how Hugo reduces it to one strong color, whether ice, silver or red. But really, I mostly wear what I bought 30 years ago. When something is strong, it stays worth keeping.” Or, you might say, reinterpreting.

Photo: Courtesy of Hugo

On Sale: Material Heels

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In an effort to help offset the cost of the most expensive disaster in history, a dedicated group of New Yorkers braved the elements last night to show their support for Japan at a fundraiser co-hosted by Martha Stewart and Wynton Marsalis. At Reika Yo Alexander’s En Japanese Brasserie, guests including Hilary Swank, Zac Posen (left, with Stewart), and Waris Ahluwalia checked their winter wear at the door and headed to check out the silent auction items.

Art made up a big part of the evening’s offerings: photographs and paintings by the likes of François Nars, Julian Schnabel, Laurie Simmons, and Terence Koh decorated one wall. That last was mulling an acquisition as well as a donation. “If I get to leave here with one thing,” Koh said, “it would be the Yoko Ono piece.” But with a fashion-heavy crowd like this, no surprise that the item attracting the most attention was a pair of gold Louis Vuitton heels (right). They came with a little something extra: the signature of their original owner, Madonna. “I thought about taking the Madonna shoes, cutting them in half, and displaying them Damien Hirst-style,” Michael Stipe mused. And while we can’t imagine that she and the Material Girl have quite the same taste in chic, even Stewart was eyeing the pair. “Madonna’s shoes, of course,” she told Style.com about the item she most coveted. “But they are a little too small for me.”

Photos: Jonathan Ziegler / Patrick McMullan.com