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August 22 2014

styledotcom In the words of Tim Blanks, "devastatingly beautiful girls looking devastatingly beautiful." stylem.ag/1tp7tXy pic.twitter.com/8SfR8yU7y7

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50 posts tagged "Humberto Leon"

EXCLUSIVE: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim on the Brand’s New London Shop, Baby OC, and More

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Opening Ceremony
Opening CeremonyOpening Ceremony’s latest addition to its growing empire, a shop at London’s Ace Hotel, officially opens its doors to the public today. “It’s a small store, but it’s a very well curated selection,” said the brand’s co-founder, Carol Lim, of the new Shoreditch outpost. (This will function as the primary OC store in London while the King Street location undergoes renovation.)

In the mix, there are offerings from OC’s roster of popular labels like Hood by Air and Raf Simons, the main OC line, and store exclusive pieces (the DKNY for Opening Ceremony collection will make its debut at the store, ahead of the September 1 official launch). There are also goods from London’s rising stars, such as Faustine Steinmetz and Marques’Almeida. “We have been big supporters of some of these labels, like Marques’Almeida, for a while, so a lot of the product is really special to us,” said Lim.

Opening Ceremony

Lim, for her part, didn’t make it to London for the opening: “I’m at home—my baby is due any day now.” She admitted that she and her OC co-founder, Humberto Leon, have babies on the mind these days. “Funny you should ask, we are working on baby gear right now. I also have a 20-month-old and Humberto has twins; it’s just a big part of our everyday lives at this point, so it makes a lot of sense.” More on that at a later date.

That’s not all they’ve got up their sleeve. “As our Opening Ceremony line continues to grow, we are really interested in exploring what a mono-brand retail format could look like,” said Lim. “We have always had our brand out with the 300-plus other brands that we carry, but we are hoping to switch things up a bit. In the next year, we are most likely going to roll out a new retail experience here in the States.”

Here, we have an exclusive first look inside the new Max Lamb-designed store.

Opening Ceremony Shoreditch at Ace Hotel, London, 106 Shoreditch High Street. For more info, visit www.openingceremony.us.

Photo: Jamie McGregor Smith 

Thomas Tait Is Top Dog, But Everyone’s a Winner at LVMH

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Thomas TaitThe atmosphere at the LVMH headquarters was electric this afternoon, as reporters, photographers, finalists, jury members, and designers all mingled before the big reveal of the inaugural LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers winner. London-based Canadian designer Thomas Tait, who won the Dorchester Collection Fashion Prize back in 2010, came out on top. “I was shocked,” he told us while sitting next to his gilded trophy. “I thought, Did that just happen?” Tait is now looking at 300,000 euros of financial support and a year’s worth of business mentoring and production advice, and naturally we were curious as to his next move. “A nice dinner, a good night’s sleep, and I need to call my mom and dad,” he said. But after that, he might take another step toward that handbag he’s been thinking about. Menswear, though, is “not such an emergency.”

The ten runners-up (formerly eleven, but Julien Dossena shuttered his line Atto to focus on his work at Paco Rabanne) were not forgotten—and they were awarded for their efforts. After taking the podium, LVMH’s Delphine Arnault first presented three students, Flavien Juan Nuñez, Peter Do, and Teruhiro Hasegawa, with 10,000-euro grants plus one-year internships with Dior, Céline, and Givenchy, respectively. Then, Arnault announced that the jury, which included designers Karl Lagerfeld, Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Humberto Leon, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, had decided to create a special prize of 100,000 euros each for two runners-up. Those honorees were Shayne Olivier of Hood by Air and Indian sisters Tina and Nikita Sutradhar of Miuniku. Currently based in Mumbai, the latter are moving their camp to London next year, with plans to show at London fashion week.

LVMH prize

Even those who walked away without a hefty purse were grateful. “It’s already been incredible in terms of exposure and meeting people—it’s like you win right out of the gate,” mused finalist Chris Gelinas. When asked about the final presentation, in which each designer, accompanied by two models, got ten minutes in front of the jury, he replied, “It felt a little like the Last Supper—all these important people lined up at one long table. I remember thinking, What did I just say to Karl Lagerfeld?

“I really appreciated the very different personalities and expressions. It was very interesting,” said jury member Ghesquière. “They all really have a vision, a story to tell, an expression, and a signature. That’s formidable. As for the jury, there was a real camaraderie,” he added, before slipping out of the room and back to work. Lagerfeld noted that the best part of the process was “having everyone all together, we never see each other because we’re working. But I hate that I want everybody to win and that’s not possible.”

“I am thrilled. It was so interesting and original. All eleven candidates were of such excellent quality; each had their style,” offered Arnault. “They are tomorrow’s great talents.” Asked if she thought the contest would draw even more than this year’s 1,221 candidatures, she replied, “I hope so!”

Photo: Getty Images; Tina Isaac-Goizé

Designer Diary: Steven Tai’s Postcard From Hyères

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Last weekend, London-based designer Steven Tai headed to the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography. As the 2012 winner of the festival’s prestigious Chloé award, the designer has a unique perspective on the fair. Here, he shares the details of his trip exclusively with Style.com.

Steven Tai

Started in 1985 by Jean-Pierre Blanc, the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography has served as a launching pad for new talents for nearly three decades. This year, Humberto Leon and Carol Lim, the creative directors of Kenzo and founders of Opening Ceremony, were the head of fashion jury for the twenty-ninth edition of the festival. As the winner of the 2012 Chloé award, I had the opportunity to show my Fall ’14 collection as part of The Formers exhibition, where previous winners of the festival present their latest work and touch base with the community that started their careers. This year, Kenta Matsushige took first prize in the fashion category, and I was lucky enough to get a first look at her collection.

Steven Tai

After disembarking the Eurostar, I made a quick pit stop at Totem’s new office in Paris to pick up my collection.

Steven Tai

A skip, a hop, a five-hour train ride, and a cab later, we arrived at the Villa Noailles, where the festival would take place the next day. The sunny weather was the first sign that this would be an amazing year.

Steven Tai

Off to the catwalk space to have a nosy peek at the rehearsal for this year’s finalists. And of course the first thing I did was have a look at the lineup…

Steven Tai

…then it was over to the runway. An amazing giant door that the models walked through reminded me of one of my favorite childhood stories, Alice in Wonderland.

Steven Tai

Back to the hotel and it was time to start some hand-sewing. Well, sort of…

Steven Tai

The next morning, finalists had to present their collections to the jury. You can see the collections lined up in the tent behind all the models in hair and makeup. There was tension—someone’s destiny was at stake. And everyone in attendance was there to support the ten finalists as they pursued their dreams.

Steven Tai

Before settling in to see the finalists’ collections, I wandered around the villa and saw the Kenzo exhibition getting installed. It featured a mixture of vintage and current Kenzo pieces on rotating mannequins.

Steven Tai

After the nerve-racking presentation to the jury, the finalists showed their collections to the press. I had the pleasure of sitting in on the press presentation. It was so interesting to hear other designers’ thought processes.

Steven Tai

After another night of hand-sewing and five coffees, the showroom was ready to go—and so was I! Continue Reading “Designer Diary: Steven Tai’s Postcard From Hyères” »

Fashion Over Function: Why Wearable Tech Is the Worst

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Google GlassNews broke yesterday morning that Google has enlisted Luxottica—the company that crafts eyewear for such brands as Prada, Ray-Ban, Chanel, Versace, and beyond—to make Google Glass less hideous. That’s all good and fine—at least the Internet giant is placing an appropriate amount of importance on aesthetics. But I have to be honest: I am deeply tired of hearing about, writing about, and thinking about wearable tech. I have no desire to be hooked up to a device all day. The nonstop e-mail-induced vibrating of my iPhone already gives me heart palpitations, and I don’t need my rings, bracelets, and specs incessantly nagging me, too.

Considering Apple’s recent hires—Saint Laurent’s former CEO of special projects Paul Deneve and Burberry’s former CEO Angela Ahrendts—and Humberto Leon and Carol Lim’s partnership with Intel, wearable tech is no doubt about to explode. And it has the potential to generate big business among Millennials who are lost without their tablets, smartphones, and various other gadgets. I’m just not interested in participating in this particular big bang.

That’s not to say that wearable tech isn’t impressive from, well, you know, a tech standpoint. I find it mind-boggling that a Nike Fuel Band has the capacity to track your steps and calories burned, and then spit that information out into the World Wide Web. However, I’m unsure why the world (or the NSA, for that matter) needs to know your, or my, workout routine. Nor do I enjoy being bombarded on Facebook by everyone’s “humble brags” about how many miles they ran today. I’ve unfriended people for less. But I digress.

As someone who has dedicated my life to fashion, I refuse to compromise on the appearance of a garment or accessory. I’d much prefer to spend my wages on a decadent pair of low-tech vintage sunnies than on a mediocre style with Wi-Fi.

Furthermore, when is enough tech enough? Despite the fact that it doubles as my career, fashion is my escape—and I think a lot of people feel that way. When I slip on a new dress or place my favorite hat upon my head, I get butterflies in my stomach. All my troubles dissolve (if only for an instant), and it’s as though I’ve been transported to my own personal sartorial oasis. Why on earth would I trade in those moments of bliss for a flashing frock with 4G capabilities?

And what’s so great about being connected all the time, anyway? Forever burned in my mind is an election party I attended in 2012. The invitees were educated, opinionated, entertaining, and dynamic, but for a good portion of the evening, I had to check their Twitter feeds in order to get their thoughts on the polls. What could have been a riveting few hours of discussion was diminished to a silent, nonstop tweet-fest. While I sat there with my iPhone tucked in my handbag (my mother always told me that it was rude to stare at one’s phone in social situations because it makes your company feel as though they’re not important), mumbling to myself, all I could think was, What a waste. Can you imagine how much worse this will become if we’re not required to take the extra step of reaching into our pockets to tweet, Instagram, e-mail, Facebook, etc.? If the Internet is latched onto our wrists or eyes, will we even speak to each other anymore?

Perhaps I’m a Luddite. And you know what? I’m OK with that. I’d prefer to be stuck in the last century than to look and live like some kind of Star Trekkian android.

Even so, I wish nothing but the best of luck to Google and Luxottica in making high-fashion face computers.

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

Modelizing the VFiles Way

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It’s back. VFiles’ satirical look at the modeling world, Model Files, returns for its third season today, and in its premiere, the mocumentary-meets-reality show’s host, casting director Preston Chaunsumlit, manages to tackle some pretty heavy topics—with his signature lighthearted approach, of course. “Not only is it really funny, but it touches on important fashion-world issues like racism and size-ism,” VFiles founder Julie Anne Quay said of the series. “You are going to love the second episode, when Preston collaborates on an über-secret project for a major international pop superstar,” she later teased.

In episode one, dubbed “The Asiancy,” Chaunsumlit addresses the lack of diversity in the modeling biz with the help of Humberto Leon, Jenny Shimizu, Jen Brill, and Quay. Sit back and watch his antics, above, and be sure to check out future episodes, airing every Tuesday, on VFiles.com.