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April 18 2014

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27 posts tagged "Hussein Chalayan"

Rethinking Fabric With Bradley Quinn

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A look from Stretchable CircuitsThree central themes form the crux of Bradley Quinn’s new book Textile Visionaries: technology, sustainability, and innovation. The tome chronicles the work of thirty-six designers from disparate places around the world, each of whom shares a common interest in pushing the boundaries of textile design—and, subsequently, fashion and interiors—forward.

“For fashion to survive in the future, it has got to marry itself to other cultural forms,” Quinn told Style.com. One example is techno-fashion, which he calls a “dream collaboration” that speeds up the way technology can be applied, packaged, or sold. It’s a subject Quinn has been researching since the nineties, a time when designers like Hussein Chalayan would go to tech fairs to see what scientific devices he could make wearable.

“Since then, a dialogue has formed in which people who are designing the techy stuff now have objectives to make technology wearable, so their products will become seamlessly integrated into our lives,” Quinn explains. Below, the author highlights the top five textile visionaries of today, all of which he cites in Textile Visionaries, set to hit shelves on August 27. Continue Reading “Rethinking Fabric With Bradley Quinn” »

Christie’s Hosts Old Queens and New

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Alexander McQueenIn the age of Middleton mania, there’s no shortage of mythology (or obsession) surrounding what it means to be a queen.

On June 4, Christie’s will unveil a preview of new exhibition, A Queen Within: Adorned Archetypes, Fashion, and Chess, which, opening in October at the World Chess Hall of Fame in Saint Louis, examines the principal monarch from a freshly cerebral perspective.

“It all started with the chess museum in Saint Louis,” relayed Swedish curator Sofia Hedman of the impending preview. “The idea is that each piece on the chessboard can be seen as a different personality, and the queen incorporates the different personalities a woman can have—the enchantress, the explorer, the ruler, the mother, and others.”

Rare pieces—Hussein Chalayan’s iconic bubble dress from Spring 2007, Maison Martin Margiela’s Spring 2001 vest made entirely from baseball gloves, and more than a few ornately embroidered gowns by Alexander McQueen (left)—are placed among lesser-known new works from “very, very unpredictable and very experimental” designers, like Charlie Le Mindu and Jordan Askill. Each touches on a different element of the regal persona, with plenty of reference to royal Dutch portraiture from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Continue Reading “Christie’s Hosts Old Queens and New” »

Turkish Delight: Chalayan/Mavi’s Denim Capsule

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Hussein Chalayan is the consummate thinking girl’s designer. Last year, Turkish denim brand Mavi announced it was teaming with the cerebral clothier, who is of Turkish Cypriot heritage, for its first designer collaboration. “Jeans hold an important place in my life. They are like my second skin,” Chalayan told Style.com. “The collaboration was a chance to work with denim specialists—it wasn’t just about the fabric itself but also learning about the construction methods and machinery. And Mavi being Turkish was an added bonus.” Arriving in stores tomorrow, the twenty-one-piece capsule features dark-wash, high-stretch denim. Details such as mesh panels, elastic bands, and bonded tape give the ultra-slim stovepipes, hot shorts, and sheath dresses a decidedly sporty look (as creative director of Puma since 2008, Chalayan knows a thing or two about athletic apparel). “Mavi understood my ideas and worked hard to turn them into reality,” said Chalayan.

The Chalayan/Mavi collection ($160 to $200) will be available at Mavi stores and select retailers, including Brooklyn Industries, starting tomorrow.

Photos: Courtesy of Mavi

On Your Marks: Carla Sozzani Sets The Pace For LFW

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“I look forward to seeing Christopher Kane, Roksanda Ilincic, and Mary Katrantzou’s shows,” 10 Corso Como’s Carla Sozzani (pictured, left) told Style.com last night at the exhibit Landing on Earth, curated by her partner and 10 CC’s creative director Kris Ruhs (pictured, right). “They always surprise me—those minds!”

It was Queens-born, Milan-based Ruhs’ first London exhibition, held in Wapping’s former Hydraulic Power Station. And despite being located in the innermost bowels of East London, Hussein Chalayan, Roksanda Ilincic, Peter Pilotto, Jean-Pierre Braganza, Boombox’s Richard Mortimer, Paolo Roversi, and Princess Julia still managed to find the venue, hidden in a dark cobblestone alleyway close to where Jack the Ripper did his work and where his spooky vibe hangs thick in the air. With the station’s soaring vaulted ceilings, gigantic boilers, wood beams and brick walls, and creepy atmosphere, Sozzani was busy taking pictures all night: “Look at that, how fantastic,” she said, snapping away as giggling partygoers lay down on Ruhs’ rotating table, their faces reflected in the Raku ceramic tree chandelier hanging above. Sozzani also trained her lens on Ruhs’ maze, which resembled a car wash (created entirely out of rubber from old tires rescued from Morocco and splashed in red paint), as well as a 30-foot metal curtain fashioned into a lattice effect. When suggested she should blog about it, Sozzani laughed: “Do you think the world needs another blogger? I am so absorbed with 10 Corso Como anyway!”

10 CC’s shop, restaurant, bookstore, gallery, and hotel rooms mean the couple is busy enough (especially Sozzani, who just arrived from the New York shows), and explains why Ruhs had been down to the eleventh hour in creation mode. “I was up painting this last night,” he said, referring to the Moroccan mosaic-motif painting. “Yes, we are busy, but the sense of liberation when it’s all done is exhilarating.” Speaking of busy, we asked Hussein Chalayan what else he will attend during LFW: “Are you kidding? I am just here for Carla and Kris! I show my collection in Paris in a couple weeks so it’s all nonstop,” he said, as other guests slowly made their way over to event number two—the Dover Street Arts Club for Stevie Wonder’s surprise gig. “I will be exhausted if I attend everything—I have to pace myself,” he said. For fashion week-goers, wiser words never spoken.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Fashion’s Nights (And Days) At The Museum

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When we set out to tell the story of 2011 by the numbers, one loomed especially large: 661,509, the record-breaking number of visitors who lined up, often for hours at a time, to see the Costume Institute’s Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty (left) at the Met.

But it wasn’t just a banner year for the Met and the late, great McQueen; designers and museums forged a strong bond this year, one that looks likely to continue well into the next. Museums across the globe invited designers into their halls and the results have made for some of the best exhibitions in memory.

During Couture week, Hussein Chalayan opened a retrospective at Paris’ Musée des Arts Decoratifs, where next year, Marc Jacobs and his work for Louis Vuitton will take up residence. The City of Light also played host to Ralph Lauren and his collection of automobiles (it also now boasts an enormous new RL store and restaurant, one of the town’s new favorite spots for burgers). And Florence is the new home of the Museo Gucci, opened during Milan’s Spring 2012 week with all due fanfare, and a Blondie performance to boot.

In America, socials flocked to San Francisco for the opening of Balenciaga and Spain (which also traveled to New York) and to Dallas for The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier, which debuted earlier this year at Montreal’s Museum of Fine Arts. Just this month, Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte opened RODARTE: Fra Angelico, a show of the dresses their created for their June presentation at Pitti, at L.A.’s LACMA.

Farther afield, Dior went to Russia, where house jewelry designer Camille Micelli sent us this postcard, for Inspiration Dior, attended, naturally, by a lavish party. And the Netherlands continues to be a slightly off-the-radar destination for fashion’s cultural tourists. A retrospective of the work of Azzedine Ala├»a is now on view in Gronningen, outside Amsterdam, and the capital’s contemporary-photo museum, FOAM, which hosted the likes of Jefferson Hack for a panel on What’s Next, which followed a retrospective of work by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin—one which eventually became the germ of their new career-spanning anthology, Pretty Much Everything.

Here in New York, the more traditional homes of fashion, like FIT’s Fashion Museum, were busy, too. The museum recently opened the first part of The Great Designers, including Armani, Dior, Givenchy, and McQueen, and plans to open part two in March. Chief curator and museum director Valerie Steele also worked with clotheshorse and collector Daphne Guinness on an exhibition of her own holdings—which, it turns out, Guinness keeps organized via computer database.

Next year, all eyes will be on Miuccia Prada for the next Costume Institute exhibition, Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada on Fashion. But before then, there’s a Louboutin retrospective in London to look forward to, on the heels of the shoemaker’s victory-lap 20th anniversary year. And WWD reports today that several fashion labels are taking a renewed interest in their own histories, too. Balmain is ramping up its archival holdings, and Chloé recently brought on an in-house archivist, in anticipation of a retrospective planned for its 60th anniversary next year.

Photo: Courtesy of the Costume Insitute