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April 19 2014

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27 posts tagged "Hussein Chalayan"

At London’s Frieze With Raf, Hussein,
And A Few Giant Purple Horses, Too

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Why is London cooler than usual? Because it’s Frieze-ing. But, given that Germans seemed to be the dominant nationality on the opening day of the Frieze Art Fair, it made sense that it was Claudia Schiffer’s open-to-buy budget that was giving gallerists chills. Plus, she was appropriately emblematic of the fashion/art nexus that gives Frieze its special flavor. Case in point: The first person I saw as I sailed through security was Raf Simons; the last, as I headed for the exit five hours later, was Hussein Chalayan. And the day began with a press brunch given by COS, Europe’s favorite “masstige” chain, followed by a curators’ tour of Frame, the new art wing of Frieze, which COS is supporting.

Each invitation to the brunch was accompanied by a hand-penned missal from artists Michael Crowe and Lenka Clayton as part of a project called Mysterious Letters, through which they intend to communicate with every single person in the world. (Just two kids with a dream!) Still, the optimistic monumentalism of their scheme felt typical of Frieze 2010, especially after the flatness of last year’s fair. There was lots and lots of really big stuff, taking a cue from the scale of Frieze itself, with more than 170 of the world’s best galleries on display. Sadie Coles was showing a 13-foot-high fireplace cast in bronze by the Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone; Emmanuel Perrotin had Xavier Veilhan’s high-octane futurist-style sculpture of a carriage drawn by four horses. It was almost life-size. And purple, to make it even more inescapable. (That’s it, pictured above, at a previous installation in Versailles.)

If 2009 featured a strong handicraft subtext, 2010 resurrected that old standby, photo-based work. Chalayan’s favorite was Marlo Pascual on Casey Kaplan’s stand. The Tennessee native’s dramatically repurposed images also captured the imagination of Francesca Amfitheatrof and Carlo Brandelli—and enough museums and collectors that Pascual was a first-day sellout. That’s the kind of new-name success story that offers an uplifting alternative to all the grandstanding that takes place at the blue-chip booths. Not to say that that isn’t enthralling, too. In fact, I’ve got to get me back there tomorrow for some more.

Photo: Florian Kleinefenn/Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin, Paris

Istanbul Fashion Week Draws A Crowd

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At the still-young Istanbul fashion week, which just completed its third season, the signs of an international fashion week seemed to be in place. Old shows (Chanel’s Spring ’10 hayride, for one) were playing on the hotel television. From the abbreviated crews of American, Italian, French, and British editors and retailers, you could easily pick out Anna Piaggi, Patricia Field, Susie Bubble, Satine’s Jeannie Lee, and Olivier Zahm. Even the absent Bryanboy wistfully tweeted that he’d like to be in the mix.

The runway offered up a mixed bag. There were the cartoony club clothes of Gunseli Turkay and the crafty futuristic eveningwear of Arzu Kaprol, an established designer with boutiques across the country. Central Saint Martins grad and Londoner Bora Aksu created a special collection just for the week, a parade of pretty pieces in nudes and pales with lingerie details inspired by a 100-year-old Istanbul shop called Butterfly Corset. But for his Spring ’11 collection, you’ll have to head to London, where he’ll show alongside countryman Hakaan Yildirim, who nabbed this year’s ANDAM prize.

“The inspiration is very literal, but it’s a first step,” said Los Angeles boutique owner Des Kohan. “The government is really positive, and there’s great buzz.” Kohan saw the pervading influence of Turkish Cypriot Hussein Chalayan, whose retrospective Hussein Chalayan: 1994-2010 is showing at Istanbul’s Museum of Modern Art. (It runs through October 24.) Chalayan, though, shows in Paris, as does another major Turkish export, Dice Kayek, the subject of a concurrent show at the museum called Istanbul/Contrast. And at a dinner for the latter label’s designer Ece Ege on the rooftop of the Marmara Pera hotel, Zahm (pictured with Ege, above) admitted the city inspired him more than the shows. “It’s the first time I’m here professionally. Istanbul has great energy; it’s like New York,” he said, before snapping pictures of the spectacular view. Truthfully, the week seemed to be more about discovering that than anything else.

Ron Galella Reminisces, The Lady Dior
Gets Larger Than Life, And More…

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Did Jackie O.—arguably the paparazzo get of the sixties—secretly love being photographed by Ron Galella (pictured, left stalking his prey)? The lensman seems to think so—though based on his description of their one conversation (“You’ve been hunting me for three months now”), we’re less sure. [The Moment]

One of fashion’s ultimate boundary crossers is, no surprise, preparing yet another boundary crossing. Hussein Chalayan is mounting an installation and film on the overlap of art and fashion at London’s Lisson gallery. [WWD]

Dior doesn’t do anything so middling as erect a mere scaffolding when it renovates a store. It just builds a giant, camouflaging Lady Dior bag. [Racked]

Your Friday not-so-surprise: Olivia Palermo would like to be a designer. [Styleite]

Fashionista does its best to translate the blog-speak of one Miss Lourdes Leon, Madonna’s daughter and muse of her Material Girl line. Since it’s often difficult to figure out what the hell the girl is talking about, we’re var var (Loures-ism: “very”) grateful, so mercizz (“thanks”). [Fashionista]

Photo: WireImage / Getty Images

Make Hers A Double

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Uniform dressing has been the buzzword on the European runways, but that doesn’t mean savvy designers haven’t found ways to tweak the suiting standards. We’re loving Paris’ creative plays on the double-breasted jacket. Stella McCartney sheared the sleeves off of hers to create a sleek camel coat-dress (left). Hussein Chalayan opened his show with several variants of the DB, each one low-slung and low-breaking for a sexier style—our favorite buttons just above the hem (center). And Phoebe Philo, a coat mistress if there is one working today, sent out a trompe l’oeil take at Celine: Hers closed along the far right side, with only a single top button to suggest a right-hand row (right).

Photos: Marcio Madeira / FirstView.com

Matthew Williamson For Guys (And Sympathetic Gals), Hussein Takes The Reins, And More…

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After testing the waters with a few men’s pieces for his H&M collaboration, Matthew Williamson is diving head-on into the men’s market with a small line due out this February. Looking at the first pieces, we think Williamson’s ladies will find plenty to poach here, too. [WWD]

Score one for the little guy: Hussein Chalayan has bought back Puma AG’s stake in his namesake company. (He’ll remain creative director of Puma.) Fashion’s high priest of avant freed of corporate control? Get ready for avant to get even, uh, avant-ier. [WWD]

The couple that works together, stays together. The first issue of the Viennese 25 magazine edited by Anja Rubik and her boyfriend, fellow model Sasha Knezevic, is out this February. We can’t imagine how Anja balances modeling, editing, and designing her own accessories line in her native Poland, but we imagine all the yoga keeps her pretty centered. [Fashionologie]

And speaking of model multi-hyphenates, Daisy Lowe has been tapped by Swarovski to design a capsule line of jewelry inspired by the stars. That’s the astronomical stars, mind you, not stepmom Gwen Stefani. [Grazia]