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July 23 2014

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11 posts tagged "i-D"

Charlotte Stockdale Talks Exploring Fashion and Her Gig at Garage

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Garage

Last October, British stylist Charlotte Stockdale announced she was leaving her post at i-D, a pillar of British street and underground fashion, and joining Garage magazine as its fashion director. The über-cool stylist’s first efforts for Dasha Zhukova’s biannual art and fashion mag were unveiled today, when issue six hit newsstands. Garage gave us an exclusive first look at its Nick Knight-lensed covers (above), which feature Karlie Kloss and Cara Delevingne. As evidenced by Garage‘s new snaps, Stockdale can seamlessly transition between high-gloss and grit—a skill that no doubt came in handy during her stints at Dazed & Confused and Harper’s Bazaar, and while styling shows for the likes of Dolce & Gabbana and Fendi. She’s worked with Karl Lagerfeld on the latter’s runway looks and campaigns for the last five years. Here, Style.com caught up with Stockdale to talk about the state of British fashion, leaving i-D, and her vision for Garage.

What drew you to Garage?
Everything about it. I remember the first issue coming out and thinking it was something different, courageous, seriously beautiful, and sometimes quite shocking. It’s not safe and it’s incredibly sophisticated. I talked on and off with Dasha about shooting for her, but it never worked because I was too busy with i-D. Then we met for tea after the summer—I was quite relaxed from holiday—and she said she was looking into a fashion director, and obviously that evolved into a conversation.

Did you feel that i-D was no longer those things—courageous, shocking, and beautiful? Is that why you left?
No, that’s not why I left. Not in the slightest. I enjoy conceptual fashion, and there isn’t a lot of space left for it anymore. Garage is a venue where conceptual fashion is still the right thing. When I started at Dazed & Confused at the beginning, conceptual fashion was the thing. I like exploring it on multilayers, not just mixing jackets and trousers for a good picture.

And how does that translate in terms of your vision for this magazine?
I would like to keep a delicate mix of sophisticated and playful. Humor is very important, but it can’t be silly, and beauty is really important. The art content is serious. I don’t mean serious in a way that it is not amusing. Some of it is very amusing, but they put in heavyweights. The fashion needs to balance that out. I love working with the stylish photographers and new photographers and new designers. So far, most of them are saying “yes.”

On the subject of new designers, who are you particularly excited about right now in London?
It sounds awfully predictable to say, but I am very interested in J.W. Anderson and Christopher Kane. London right now has finally hit its stride. There’s Peter Pilotto, Mary Katrantzou, etc., and they have all found this balance between creativity and the business, which are equally important. That wasn’t so much the case when I was young. Some succeeded and others didn’t—the balance wasn’t correct. I have seen so much talent leave Britain and move to other cities. We have always felt it was such a shame that these kids aren’t back at home building proper brands themselves.

How do you think this momentum with London fashion will progress in the next few seasons?
I think the momentum will continue. With Natalie Massenet at the helm of British Fashion Council, everything has stepped up a few notches. Obviously, she is a lady of no fear. These young designers all have solid bases, and they are building proper businesses. The month is a very crowded month, and it is pretty challenging for [fashion] people like ourselves. London used to be a three-day thing and you could miss it. Now it’s a solid five-day event full of high-class content. It is the most interesting fashion week aside from Paris.

Photos: Nick Knight

Ready. Set. Show!

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Marc Jacobs Spring '14

With New York fashion week less than a week away, there’s a lot to look forward to. The glitz! The glamour! The street styles! But we can’t help but feel a slight panic attack coming on as well. The mammoth show schedule ensures that the fashion set will be uptown at Lincoln Center one minute, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard the next (ahem, Alexander Wang), and over in West Chelsea just moments later. We’re not even sure that Uber will be able to manage the hordes of requests. Of course, despite the crosstown commutes and subzero temps, you’re expected to be at the top of your game—and look it, too. i-D magazine compiled fifty pieces of useful advice for surviving, nay, thriving during the freezing, sleep-deprived, party-packed week ahead. More important, though, it reminds us to embrace it all with a wink and a smile. We’ve called out our five favorite tips below, and will be putting the entire list to use come Wednesday.

1. Being clean is unfailingly chic.

2. Boys who dress like girls are a grand tradition that must be preserved at all costs. Ditto, girls who dress like boys.

3. Words like “edgy” and “directional” should be used sparingly, otherwise you sound like the tacky fashion “expert” off breakfast telly.

4. If you are going to blog about fashion, make sure you can string a sentence together.

5. All the best avant-garde looks will get you arrested—for example, women wearing trousers in Paris, back in 1800.

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

The British Fashion Awards’ Big Winners Revealed

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Chris Kane and Donatella Versace

Pillars of the British fashion industry gathered at the London Coliseum tonight for the British Fashion Awards—an annual ceremony that honors the crème de la crème of the country’s creative talents. In addition to much-coveted honors such as Womenswear Designer of the Year (which Donatella Versace presented to Christopher Kane), Brand of the Year (won by Burberry, whose Christopher Bailey also took the Menswear Designer of the Year title), Accessories Designer of the Year (won by Nicholas Kirkwood), Model of the Year (Edie Campbell), and the International Designer of the Year Award (Miuccia Prada), there were a few special prizes to bestow. i-D magazine’s founders Terry and Tricia Jones earned a standing ovation when they picked up their Outstanding Achievement Award, Marc Jacobs turned up to hand Kate Moss her Special Recognition Award, and Samantha Cameron presented a deserving Suzy Menkes with her Lifetime Achievement honor. As for the up-and-comers, J.W. Anderson took the New Establishment Award, while Simone Rocha and Agi & Sam won the emerging womenswear and menswear categories, respectively. Finally, the Emerging Accessories Designer Award fittingly went to Nicholas Kirkwood’s protégée Sophia Webster. Tune in tomorrow for complete coverage of the ceremony, as well as Kate Moss’ undoubtedly raucous after-fete. To see all the winners, visit the British Fashion Council’s Web site.

i-D Ups Its Online Game

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i-D

Last week, i-D rolled out its eye-popping new Web site, i-d.co. Having launched with a collaborative M.I.A. x Kenzo music video, the iconic magazine’s new online home will offer full-bleed imagery, quirky videos starring personalities such as Rick Owens, Lily McMenamy, Sky Ferreira, and more, and, soon, an interactive social-media component. The Web venture, which was feted at a veritable runway rave in New York last night, is a decidedly high-tech move for the publication, which, founded by Terry Jones in 1980, earned cult status because of its gritty fanzine approach to documenting London’s creative culture. Of course, it also helped that, early in their careers, photographers such as Nick Knight, Mario Testino, and Juergen Teller shot for the publication, and Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and even Madonna winked for its covers in their youth.

The site is thanks in part to Vice—the forward-thinking, in-your-face, Brooklyn-based media company that acquired i-D last December. “Vice’s whole push was to take i-D into the digital realm, which it wasn’t. We had a Web site, but it’s nothing like what we have now,” offered i-D editor Holly Shackleton. “Vice has been incredibly respectful. They haven’t been involved in our editorial choices,” she added. “They’ve just given us the digital know-how and business sense to start something new and launch the site.” More developments are on the horizon. i-D will soon open an office here in New York, and Jones, who’s been with the publication for the past thirty-three years, will take a notable step back. “He’ll always be on the masthead as founder,” offered Shackleton, stressing that while he’ll still be somewhat involved, he’s looking to spend more time with his family.

The Web site’s launch party in West Chelsea was a fitting display of fresh, edgy clothes and pioneering technology. In partnership with Samsung, the magazine flew over three of London’s hottest new talents—Ryan LO, Claire Barrow, and Ashley Williams (all Fashion East alums)—and had them present their collections in a holographic show. It was one-part IRL models (including Hanne Gaby Odiele), one-part virtual projections. Audience members (M.I.A. among them) could hardly tell who was real and who was simulated as the catwalkers danced amid computer-generated acid rain and floating gemstones. The crowd bounced and, at some points, fist-pumped to the EDM runway tunes. And even though partygoers were sipping champagne, the event exuded the underground cool that made i-D a force in the first place. “i-D has always been a global fashion community, and we hope the new site will encourage that,” said Shackleton. “We wanted to introduce these young British talents to a New York audience. They’re all future stars, without a doubt.”

Take a look at i-D‘s new online digs at www.i-d.vice.com.

Photo: Laura June Kirsch

As 2012 Comes To A Close…

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Newsweek—in print form—closes with it. The magazine will go digital-only in 2013; this week, the historic title released its last paper-and-ink issue, complete with hashtag coverline. The announcement a few weeks ago raised (again) the print-is-dead alarms, but 2012 wasn’t all bad for magazines. Several others did shutter, including Vogue Hommes Japan and Whole Living, but the year also saw the launch of Du Jour, M, and the relaunch of Best Life, as well as the late-breaking sale of i-D to Vice Media. Onward to 2013.