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August 30 2014

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4 posts tagged "Indochine"

A Dinner Date With Jason Wu

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Jason Wu Spring '14

For the past two seasons, Jason Wu’s ads have explored New York’s most iconic eateries. With Inez & Vinoodh behind the lens, he took Stephanie Seymour to La Grenouille for Spring ’13 and dined with Christy Turlington at Mr. Chow last Fall. The restaurant tour continues for Spring ’14, as Wu’s latest campaign depicts show opener Karen Elson posing against the famed leafy wallpaper at Indochine. “There is something so unapologetically glamorous about these images that seem to embody everything that I adore and want to express through my clothes,” said Wu of the ongoing narrative.

Jason Wu Spring '14The restaurant, which has hosted more art and fashion fetes than we have room to list since opening in 1984, is a fitting backdrop for Wu’s moody Spring snaps. And the designer has some particularly fond memories of the enduring hot spot. “I first went to Indochine when I was a student at Parsons. I snuck into a party there during fashion week and met Cindy Crawford. I was so starstruck!” Wu recalled. “As a child of the 90s, I’ve always idolized supermodels, and that was the first time I had ever met one. It was a religious experience.” The insider mainstay has since become one of Wu’s favorite places to grab a bite. “There’s never a dull night there! I always meet the most interesting people,” he said. These days, it’s safe to bet that Wu is always on the list.

Take a first look at Jason Wu’s Inez & Vinoodh-lensed Spring ’14 campaign here, exclusively on Style.com.

Photo: Inez & Vinoodh

See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book

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Andy Warhol 
From Warhol’s Factory to Basquiat’s studio, throughout the eighties, downtown Manhattan was the place for young creative types to be. Photographer Jeannette Montgomery Barron was there, and her new tome, Scene, is a sort of yearbook of the time, documenting the likes of Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, Francesco Clemente, Willem Dafoe, and more early in their careers. “I was just a fly on the wall,” recalls Montgomery Barron, speaking at Indochine, one of her old haunts. (“It looks almost exactly the same, but there were a lot of drugs happening in the bathrooms back then.”) This afternoon, she’ll sign copies of Scene—which, in addition to the snaps, features personal anecdotes about each artist—at Bookmarc, and starting tomorrow, a select group of her black-and-white photographs will be on display in an exhibition at ClampArt. Here, Montgomery Barron discusses her book, and reminisces about shooting Warhol, working out with Bianca Jagger, and spending time with Basquiat.

 

How did you find yourself in the center of the eighties New York art scene?  

I was just lucky. It’s not that I went out and said, “I want to record every artist from A to Z.” It was more like I’d photograph Francesco Clemente, and he’d say, “You should really go photograph my friend Kenny Scharf.” It was very organic in that way. And, I mean, I knew I could drop a name. I’m sure I said, “Hey, I’m a friend of Andy Warhol. Can I shoot you?” I guess I’d get an adrenaline surge.

 

In the book, you mention that you could just call up Andy Warhol and ask to take his picture. What were those sittings like?  

The first time I photographed him was at the Factory in Union Square, and he wouldn’t even let me out of the outer lobby. When I met Bianca Jagger and we became friends, he warmed up. He never really talked much, but he always made you feel like you were the most brilliant person who said the most profound things. Continue Reading “See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book” »

Leonard DiCaprio: A Tale Of Two Parties

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Singlehandedly raising the New York fashion week celebrity quotient by 10,000 per cent, Leonardo DiCaprio strode into last night’s Giorgio Armani store opening bash. The look: suited up and slicked back. A few hours later, the actor snuck almost incognito into Indochine for the packed, raucous after-party for the Vladimir Restoin-Roitfeld-curated Collective Hardware photo show. By now he’d turned into the Leo more familiar to L.A. and NYC night owls-i.e., the one with the baseball cap pulled low over his eyes.

Photo: Sherly Rabbani and Josephine Solimene

Indochine: Hot For The Holidays?

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Sure, Indochine’s sultry lighting, tropical decor, and impossibly attractive staff had its heyday in the eighties, but there’s clearly still some allure left in the old girl. Spotted dining there last night, at separate tables: Interview editorial director Fabien Baron with Paris Vogue stylist Ludivine Poiblanc; Vladimir Restoin-Roitfeld celebrating his birthday with a big group of friends including Stavros Niarchos, Lily Donaldson, and sister Julia; and artist Tom Sachs with an unidentified friend.

Photo: Courtesy of Indochine