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July 28 2014

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4 posts tagged "Ingrid Sischy"

The Daily‘s Night

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The Daily Front Row First Annual Fashion Media Awards sponsored by Samsung

Friday evening, underneath the massive crystal chandeliers and amid the rococo decor of the Upper East Side’s Harlow restaurant, fashion’s boldfaced names gathered to dole out The Daily Front Row‘s first annual Fashion Media Awards. The vibe was touchingly familiar, with Tim Gunn introducing TV Personality of the Year Heidi Klum (“I met Heidi nine years ago, and I was a trembling, nervous, sweating, sputtering battling wreck—and I sustained that same demeanor for many, many seasons of Project Runway,” he recalled), Marc Jacobs speaking for the Editor in Chief of the Year winner, Grazia UK‘s Jane Bruton (“She’s the perfect combination of smart, bubbly, and fun—and from what I hear, sometimes a little too much fun,” he joked), and Lady Gaga, in a frenetic finale, presenting Stephen Gan with his Fashion Magazine of the Year award.

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele introduced Model of the Year, Social Media, Karlie Kloss, and reminisced about their first shoot together with Steven Meisel, while Jessica Biel and Elle‘s Joe Zee (winner of the Creative Director of the Year) joked about their “first time” (i.e., first cover) together in 2007, and the discovery of Zee’s “sick hip-hop dance” moves in the years that followed. Later, Bruce Weber came to the stage to speak for longtime friend and Fashion Scoop of the Year winner Ingrid Sischy, who was recognized for her John Galliano feature in Vanity Fair. He was quick to emphasize the significance of the fact that—in the age of insta-everything—her story took two years to complete.

“I think it’s actually a great thing to do a Fashion Media Awards, because fashion media really are a part of the business of fashion—and really help in shaping and creating the image of fashion,” said Jay Manuel between texts to DVF (“Looking forward to that show!”). “The people who go behind the scenes typically need to have the spotlight shot on them, so people know who is behind the images.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Awards Worth A Couple Thousand Words, At Least

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“The art of telling a story cannot be done better than it is with a picture,” said lensman Mark Seliger (pictured) last night at the International Center of Photography’s 26th annual Infinity Awards. His tablemates—Ingrid Sischy, Craig McDean, and Calvin Klein (that last no stranger to telling a fashion story, often sans clothes, in the medium)—would likely agree. When Seliger first moved to New York, he went on, he volunteered at the Center in exchange for darkroom time, and the debt runs deep. “Giving back to the ICP is important because the act of documenting what is going on—which is so crazy—is so important!” Rising star Alexi Lubomirski agreed, adding that photography has an immediacy that other mediums lack. As a “frustrated artist,” he finds that “when you paint a painting, it takes three months before you know if it’s good or not. With photography, it is instantaneous! Though,” he went on to add ruefully, “that can be a bad thing…”

The awards this year passed over fashion-centric photogs, but the style set was still well represented—not only by Klein, McDean, and Sischy, but designers Jay Kos, Gaby Basora, and W‘s Stefano Tonchi, too. The awards themselves were presented to, among others, Luc Sante, for his writings on photography; to photojournalist Reza for his gritty wartime captures in Afghanistan; to artist Lorna Simpson; and to Raphaël Dallaporta, who nabbed the Young Photographer Award. Duly collected, it was time for a stylish exit. In the words of Danielle Levitt, who’s shot for The New York Times Magazine, Arena Homme Plus, and Details, “This was amazing! Now it’s time I beat some people to my cab.”

Photo: Stephanie Badini

Von Unwerth, Unearthed

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Ellen von Unwerth doesn’t pick and choose. She loves all women. “There are many who are my favorites, from Claudia Schiffer to Eva Herzigova to Elizabeth Hurley to Lindsay Lohan,” said von Unwerth last night at Sloane Square’s Michael Hoppen Gallery during a private viewing of Fraulein, a collection of her rarely seen or published photographs. Von Unwerth continued, “They are all fun and they give a lot.”

That was evident in the sexy, girly photographs of von Unwerth’s array of beautiful subjects, all in various stages of undress with lots of lingerie, toys, and even the odd vegetable thrown in. There was Claudia with big hair in her underwear—an image eventually used for a Guess campaign; Kate Moss making horn-rimmed glasses sexy; and Monica Bellucci in nipple tassels. In “What recession?” news, several prints of Heidi, Kitzbuhel, the photographer’s racy take on the Alpine Miss in red stockings and garters, as well as Nadja Auermann in a mask, have all but sold out. (More images after the jump.) Continue Reading “Von Unwerth, Unearthed” »

Blasblog: Ingrid Sischy And Her Most Intimate 60

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With the exception of one crasher, who was bold enough to swoop into the seat between Zaha Hadid and Jeff Koons, it was wall-to-wall VIPs at the Waverly Inn dinner following last night’s opening of the Chanel Mobile Art Pavilion in Central Park. “Just my 60 nearest and dearest,” joked host Ingrid Sischy. Julian Schnabel, Kate Bosworth, Bruce Weber, and Amanda Harlech were among those who made the cut. Working the room alongside the former Interview editor was Karl Lagerfeld himself. We spotted him deep in conversation with Leigh Lezark, Lorraine Bracco, and Donna Karan. He was a busy man, one you had to work hard to get the ear of. Blake Lively debated with beau Penn Bagley about interjecting. “I don’t want to interrupt to say goodbye, but I can’t decide if it’s more rude to do that, or leave without saying anything at all.” (She waited a few, and then got in there.) It might have been Sischy’s dinner, but it was the Kaiser’s night. “I came for the ballet,” American Ballet Theatre costume designer Olivier Theyskens said. “But I stayed for Karl.”