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August 28 2014

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12 posts tagged "Iris van Herpen"

An Inside Look at Iris van Herpen’s ANDAM Win

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irisIris van Herpen is the winner of the 25th edition of the ANDAM Prize. The announcement was made at a cocktail party at the Hotel France-Amérique this evening in Paris, but some Twitter users were in early on the announcement. A stray Tweet made its way online before the jurors—among them first-time members including chairman and CEO of Kering Fçois-Henri Pinault, Estée Lauder’s John Demsey, Condé Nast France president Xavier Romatet, and Caroline de Maigret—adjourned for the day.

In her second year competing for the prize, Van Herpen beat out Fausto Puglisi (who in addition to his own line also creative directs Emanuel Ungaro), Yiqing Yin, Rad Hourani, Steven Tai, Jean-Paul Lespagnard, and the Études Studios trio. The Dutch 29-year-old will receive 250,000 euros and mentorship from Pinault. “It was a real privilege [to participate],” Pinault told Style.com. “The ANDAM Grand Prix is so important for the promotion of young designers in Paris. I didn’t expect this level of maturity, frankly. It was really an honor.” He went on: “I will be mentoring Iris for two seasons, and I intend to give her access to any of our brands that will help her in her project. There’s a great deal of opportunity for her.”

Van Herpen caused a mini-sensation at her first-ever ready-to-wear show for Fall ’14 last March when she suspended three models in shrink-wrapped plastic garbage bags in what she described as commentary on the commodification of the human body. Innovation is at the heart of Van Herpen’s work, and it was a key factor in her win today (as a jury member myself, I can vouch for that). “Until now, I’ve been focusing on couture to give myself the freedom and time to work on new materials and new production methods,” she said, after accepting the prize from Pinault and ANDAM’s Nathalie Dufour. “But I really feel like [my experiments] are ready to translate into the ready-to-wear now.”

Coperni’s Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant, who claimed Nicolas Ghesquière and J.W. Anderson as their designer icons, won the 75,000 euro First Collection prize. Meyer, the designer half of the duo, is already a step ahead of some of the competitors in today’s Grand Prize category. He has a business partner in Vaillant. There’s no substitute for creativity. But, pointed out jury member Federico Marchetti of The Corner, “a business partner is something every designer needs.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Iris van Herpen Takes the ANDAM Prize

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Iris van Herpen Fall 2013 HCConceptual Dutch designer Iris van Herpen has won the 2014 ANDAM prize, beating out talented nominees Fausto Puglisi, Steven Tai, Rad Hourani, Yiqing Yin, Études Studio, and Jean-Paul Lespagnard. Van Herpen, best known for her complex, hyper-sculptural, often futuristic wares, joins the ranks of such former winners as Alexandre Mattiussi, Giles Deacon, Richard Nicoll, and Gareth Pugh. A panel of judges including Ellen von Unwerth, Caroline de Maigret, Condé Nast France president Xavier Romatet, and Style.com’s own Nicole Phelps sat on the 2014 judges panel. Van Herpen has earned a €250,000 prize, a yearlong business mentorship courtesy of Kering’s François-Henri Pinault, and €10,000 worth of Swarovski crystals.

Photo: WWD

2014 ANDAM Finalists Revealed

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This morning, ANDAM announced its 2014 Fashion Prize finalists. Fausto Puglisi, Iris van Herpen, Steven Tai, Rad Hourani, Yiqing Yin, Études Studio, and Jean-Paul Lespagnard will compete for the award, the winner of which will be announced in Paris this July. Last year’s prize was awarded to menswear youngblood Alexander Mattiusi, while other alums include Giles Deacon, Richard Nicoll, and Gareth Pugh. The ANDAM Fashion Prize, which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, offers designers a 250,000 Euro prize, a yearlong business mentorship courtesy of Kering’s François-Henri Pinault, and 10,000 Euros of Swarovski crystals. Another trio of talents, Coperni, Gauchère and Monographie, are up for the 75,000 euros First Collections prize. “I am very honored to be apart of this year’s finalists. The ANDAM Award is one of the most globally recognized support for designers over the last 25 years. I am incredibly excited (and a bit nervous too!) to present my work to the jury,” offered Steven Tai. Speaking of the jury, this years judges include Ellen von Unwerth, Caroline de Maigret, Condé Nast France president Xavier Romatet, and Style.com’s own Nicole Phelps, among others. Have a gander at some of the finalists’ designs here.

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Photo: Courtesy Photos 

The Brooklyn Museum’s Going Head Over Heels

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LouboutinWe’re the first to admit that heels are a powerful thing. Each season we manage to add a few (or a dozen) must-have pairs to our overstuffed wardrobes. And why? Is it because heels are sexy? Flattering? Outfit-making? Or just fun to wear? The Brooklyn Museum will explore these questions (and many more) with its upcoming exhibition Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe. On view from September 10, the exhibit will feature 160 heels from as early as the 17th century to today. A main focus will be the sculptural, architectural, and artistic qualities of high heels, which range from the wearable to the avant-garde. On one end of the spectrum will be designs by household names like Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Chanel, and Roger Vivier, on the other, conceptual styles by Iris van Herpen, Elsa Schiaparelli, Zaha Hadid, and many more.

Highlights from the exhibit include Marilyn Monroe’s Ferragamo stilettos from 1959; silk, metal, and glass mules by Vivier for House of Dior from 1960; Céline’s mink-covered pumps from Spring ’13; eight-inch platforms designed by Rem D. Koolhaas for Lady Gaga; and mind-bending 3-D-printed heels by Van Herpen.

In addition to the show, there will be a fully illustrated catalog with essays by Stefano Tonchi, Lisa Small, and Caroline Weber, as well as six short films inspired by high heels. The films were commissioned from artists including Steven Klein, Nick Knight, and Marilyn Minter. The full exhibition will also be traveling to other venues, which have yet to be announced.

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe will run from September 10, 2014 through February 15, 2015 at the Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238. For more information, visit brooklynmuseum.org.

Photo: Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum 

EXCLUSIVE: Victoria’s Secret in 3-D

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Victoria's Secret Corset“This is a new way to make a garment that’s never been done before,” explained Shapeways industrial designer Duann Scott from the heart of the brand’s Long Island City factory. He’s talking about 3-D printing—the process by which a pulsed laser cuts through layers of heated powdered materials (such as nylon, powered plastic, sterling silver, gold, even sandstone) to create computer-calculated shapes and designs. Shapeways is one of a handful of companies bringing 3-D printing, a technology traditionally used by architects and engineers, to the public market. In the past, it has been used to create everything from hearing aids to museum interiors; Dutch designer Iris Van Herpen was one of the first to apply the process to wearable items. Now, Victoria’s Secret is introducing 3-D-printed designs—just in time for its big fashion show on November 13.

“It’s exciting that we get to use this—we’ve never done it,” related Victoria’s Secret collection design coordinator Sarah Sophia Lidz. “It’s the first time, and it will be perfect for this section, too. It’s called Snow Angels, and it’s really a nod to the iconic Victoria’s Secret theme, with beautiful white wings inspired by snowflakes, snowfall, frost, the northern lights—there’s a lot of Swarovski.”

The 3-D-printed item in question is a Swarovski Crystal-encrusted corset, modeled to look like a snowflake, encasing the model Lindsay Ellingson’s body. It was designed off a full-body scan to fit Ellingson exactly.

The making of Victoria's Secret's 3D corset

“We’ve seen some 3-D printing in fashion, in the haute couture in Europe. So it’s been very rigid things, very artful things, but nothing that’s been nice to wear,” added Scott. “This is the first piece for a mainstream brand—with a focus on the elegant, sensual form—not just rigid and stiff and alien-like. It’s wearable.” The corset debuts exclusively above.

As for what’s up next in the 3-D sphere, Scott offered, “We’re seeing an evolution in the materials that we can use in 3-D printing.” As more and more designers turn to 3-D printing, more and more pliable fabrics will be developed. “But the interesting thing about 3-D printing and design is, traditional fabric is either a stitch or a weave, and maybe a chain mail in there, but with 3-D printing, we can do all three of those simultaneously, in one garment, in one material,” added Scott. “So there are new ways to control the way the fabric falls and reacts to the body. There is lots of room for evolving the garment.”

Photos: Eli Schmidt