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April 20 2014

styledotcom Platinum blond? So predictable! stylem.ag/1l3QRnh

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9 posts tagged "Iris van Herpen"

The Brooklyn Museum’s Going Head Over Heels

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LouboutinWe’re the first to admit that heels are a powerful thing. Each season we manage to add a few (or a dozen) must-have pairs to our overstuffed wardrobes. And why? Is it because heels are sexy? Flattering? Outfit-making? Or just fun to wear? The Brooklyn Museum will explore these questions (and many more) with its upcoming exhibition Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe. On view from September 10, the exhibit will feature 160 heels from as early as the 17th century to today. A main focus will be the sculptural, architectural, and artistic qualities of high heels, which range from the wearable to the avant-garde. On one end of the spectrum will be designs by household names like Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Chanel, and Roger Vivier, on the other, conceptual styles by Iris van Herpen, Elsa Schiaparelli, Zaha Hadid, and many more.

Highlights from the exhibit include Marilyn Monroe’s Ferragamo stilettos from 1959; silk, metal, and glass mules by Vivier for House of Dior from 1960; Céline’s mink-covered pumps from Spring ’13; eight-inch platforms designed by Rem D. Koolhaas for Lady Gaga; and mind-bending 3-D-printed heels by Van Herpen.

In addition to the show, there will be a fully illustrated catalog with essays by Stefano Tonchi, Lisa Small, and Caroline Weber, as well as six short films inspired by high heels. The films were commissioned from artists including Steven Klein, Nick Knight, and Marilyn Minter. The full exhibition will also be traveling to other venues, which have yet to be announced.

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe will run from September 10, 2014 through February 15, 2015 at the Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238. For more information, visit brooklynmuseum.org.

Photo: Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum 

EXCLUSIVE: Victoria’s Secret in 3-D

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Victoria's Secret Corset“This is a new way to make a garment that’s never been done before,” explained Shapeways industrial designer Duann Scott from the heart of the brand’s Long Island City factory. He’s talking about 3-D printing—the process by which a pulsed laser cuts through layers of heated powdered materials (such as nylon, powered plastic, sterling silver, gold, even sandstone) to create computer-calculated shapes and designs. Shapeways is one of a handful of companies bringing 3-D printing, a technology traditionally used by architects and engineers, to the public market. In the past, it has been used to create everything from hearing aids to museum interiors; Dutch designer Iris Van Herpen was one of the first to apply the process to wearable items. Now, Victoria’s Secret is introducing 3-D-printed designs—just in time for its big fashion show on November 13.

“It’s exciting that we get to use this—we’ve never done it,” related Victoria’s Secret collection design coordinator Sarah Sophia Lidz. “It’s the first time, and it will be perfect for this section, too. It’s called Snow Angels, and it’s really a nod to the iconic Victoria’s Secret theme, with beautiful white wings inspired by snowflakes, snowfall, frost, the northern lights—there’s a lot of Swarovski.”

The 3-D-printed item in question is a Swarovski Crystal-encrusted corset, modeled to look like a snowflake, encasing the model Lindsay Ellingson’s body. It was designed off a full-body scan to fit Ellingson exactly.

The making of Victoria's Secret's 3D corset

“We’ve seen some 3-D printing in fashion, in the haute couture in Europe. So it’s been very rigid things, very artful things, but nothing that’s been nice to wear,” added Scott. “This is the first piece for a mainstream brand—with a focus on the elegant, sensual form—not just rigid and stiff and alien-like. It’s wearable.” The corset debuts exclusively above.

As for what’s up next in the 3-D sphere, Scott offered, “We’re seeing an evolution in the materials that we can use in 3-D printing.” As more and more designers turn to 3-D printing, more and more pliable fabrics will be developed. “But the interesting thing about 3-D printing and design is, traditional fabric is either a stitch or a weave, and maybe a chain mail in there, but with 3-D printing, we can do all three of those simultaneously, in one garment, in one material,” added Scott. “So there are new ways to control the way the fabric falls and reacts to the body. There is lots of room for evolving the garment.”

Photos: Eli Schmidt

Iris Van Herpen Uses 3-D Printing For The Win

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A look from Iris Van Herpen's Voltage collectionConceptual Dutch fashion designer Iris van Herpen—best known for her hyper-complex, sculptural wares—has won the top prize in the Dutch Design Awards’ fashion category. Her 3-D printed collection dubbed Voltage, which she showed in Paris last January, inspired the judges to award her the honor. “With Voltage, van Herpen gives the world a view into the future of fashion,” offered the festival’s jury. Looks like we have yet another indication that 3-D printing will play a significant role in the fashion industry of tomorrow—or even of today.

Photo: Getty Images

Alexandre Mattiussi Wins ANDAM’s Top Prize

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Alexandre Mattiussi

AMI‘s Alexandre Mattiussi won this year’s ANDAM Fashion Prize in Paris yesterday, beating out an international list of contenders that included Olympia Le-Tan, Maison Rabih Kayrouz, Iris Van Herpen, Yang Li, and Masha Ma. Mattiussi will receive 250,000 euros and mentoring from Renzo Rosso. ANDAM’s First Collection Prize went to Christine Phung. She’ll take home 75,000 euros. At the cocktail party that followed the competition, Mattiussi revealed that he and Phung were in the same class at France’s Duperré School. Mattiussi does menswear and Phung women’s, but they took similar paths to launching their own lines, apprenticing at different houses—Givenchy and Marc Jacobs for his part, and Christophe Lemaire, Chloé, Vanessa Bruno, Lacoste, and Dior for hers. An award ceremony will take place on October 3, during Paris Fashion Week.

Photo: Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

A Little Bit of Heaven

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 Heaven Tanudiredja's Fall '13 Collection

“I don’t like practical jewelry,” said Bali-born, Antwerp-based Heaven Tanudiredja. “I don’t like jewelry that’s normal or classic, either,” he continued. That would explain the designer’s hyper-sculptural necklaces, cuffs, and harnesses, which, as we’re sure you’ve now gathered, are none of the above. Having launched his range in 2007 while working with Dries Van Noten (he also did a stint at John Galliano’s Dior after graduating from the Royal Academy in Antwerp), Tanudiredja sees jewelry as a form of armor. “And I think it’s a way of telling a story—you have to discover all the details to understand it,” he offered.

Last season, his story began in a particularly unexpected place. The Fall 2013 collection was inspired by mental illness—specifically, autism. After diving into research, Tanudiredja felt that those who suffer from such disorders are seemingly trapped in a mental cage. “But if you stay inside your head,” he said, “there can be a beautiful chaos. I tried to put that beautiful [aspect] into the collection.” The result was weighty brass, gold, and vintage crystal wares covered with tiny, empty chairs, metallic wheels (representative of the constantly spinning psychological gears), and small hands that can’t quite touch. “It’s intense,” said the 30-year-old designer. No kidding. Continue Reading “A Little Bit of Heaven” »