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August 20 2014

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16 posts tagged "Issey Miyake"

Editor Obsessions: Issey Miyake’s Bao Bao Platinum Tote

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Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

Issey Miyake

I walk by the Issey Miyake Pleats Please store on Mercer Street every time I go to Physique57. Usually I don’t make it more than once a week (Sunday, 9 a.m.), but between Memorial Day and Labor Day, the class is a cherished late Friday afternoon activity. The extra pass-by has given me a lot of time to contemplate Miyake’s Bao Bao bags. Lately I’ve become especially keen on this platinum Prism tote. Big enough for my workout clothes plus my everyday essentials, it’s also remarkably lightweight. Nothing kills a Summer Friday buzz or an exercise high faster than a hot, heavy leather bag.

Issey Miyake Bao Bao Platinum Tote, $1,295. Buy it now.

Photo: via isseymiyake.com

The Split-Second Preview: Issey Miyake

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The Spring ’15 menswear collections have marched down the catwalk in London, Florence, and Milan, and tomorrow, will kick off in Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Spring ’15 previews is available here.

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WHO: Issey Miyake, designed by Yusuke Takahashi

WHERE: Paris

WHEN: Thursday, June 26

WHAT: “Tropical elements, vibrant colors, jellyfish patterns and natural textures served as the inspiration for SS15.”—Yusuke Takahashi. The designer sent us his Spring ’15 inspiration image, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Issey Miyake

What’s Old Is Now: Byronesque Debuts Its Latest Vintage Lineup

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Alaia Alaia“There’s a lot of ugly vintage out there,” said Byronesque founder Gill Linton. “I look at some vintage stores, and I’m like, ‘This is trash. It’s not fashion. There’s no story behind it. And you’re giving it such a bad name.’” You won’t find any of that rubbish on Linton’s website, which she launched in 2012 with the help of Marvin Traub Associates and Theory’s Andrew Rosen. As a die-hard vintage addict (and frequent Byronesque browser), I can personally attest to the fact that Linton only sells the crème de la crème of previously loved designer clothes and that Byronesque is the prime source of authentic vintage—i.e., clothes over twenty years old—on the Web. Byronesque is a veritable vault of lust-worthy vintage wares by the likes of Azzedine Alaïa, Vivienne Westwood, Pierre Cardin, Thierry Mugler, and more. So naturally, when Linton invited me to a private viewing of the latest additions to the site—which will be available to stylists for shoots for the first time—last week, I scurried on over.

Buyers from the Met had beat me to the event and scooped up an original 1920s frock, an authentic 1980s Yohji Yamamoto bustle coat (famously snapped by Nick Knight), a rare white crucifix-embellished Alaïa, and a sculptural black-and-white Issey Miyake gown. “I do love when they go to good homes,” Linton said of the museum’s purchases. The Met’s interest in Linton’s finds is a testament to her well-trained eye and standout merchandise. And despite the museum’s informed acquisitions, there was still much in the collection to gawk at. A custom-made Alexander McQueen three-piece men’s suit (complete with his signature lock of hair), an almost uptown-apropos lemon Galliano frock (“Though you wouldn’t see quite this much fashion tit on the Upper East Side,” laughed Linton), and a 1990s warrior-inspired Comme des Garçons ensemble comprise just a sampling of what’s available. “This is what we call contemporary vintage,” explained Linton. “It’s different from being classic—classic is safe. But it’s relevant and wearable today, and nobody’s going to say you look like an extra in Downton Abbey or an Austin Powers movie.” To wit, one of Linton’s colleagues turned up to the soiree wearing shorts by Rick Owens, which were the spitting image of the vintage Armani “Wigger Shorts” that hung on the rack next to him.

Issey MiyakeChanel

Many of the most covetable pieces, like a serious supermodel-era neon tweed bra, shorts, and jacket by Chanel; the abovementioned Issey Miyake look; a cracked leather McQueen coat; a sea foam tulle Yves Saint Laurent dress; and an iconic leopard-print Alaïa frock, are courtesy of two singular women: model Irina Pantaeva and pop star Cristina Monet. The former was a muse to Miyake, and was actually photographed by Irving Penn wearing the gown purchased by the Met. The latter was a post-punk music maven with a miniature waist and impeccable taste. Their clothes have stories behind them—not only because they were designed by icons, but because of the life these women gave them. And that life, along with the garments’ superior aesthetic and quality, is what Linton is selling. “I really want people to feel excited about these clothes and their past,” Linton told us. After thumbing through this selection, it’s hard not to be.

Byronesque’s latest offering will be available on the website next week, but to reserve your favorite piece ahead of the pack, e-mail personalshopper@byronesque.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Byronesque 

From Anime to Zen, Tokyo Fashion Week Had It All

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Tokyo Fashion Week

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tokyo closed on Saturday, just as the cherry blossoms were starting to paint the town pink. The fashion found on Tokyo’s Fall ’14 runways seemed more “Japanese avant-garde” than ever, but perhaps not in the way one might think. While the Japanese in Paris tend to be severe and dark, the inclinations of Tokyo’s catwalks lean more to the kawaii street movements that come with bright colors and catchy hooks of POP. Issey Miyake-backed brand Né-net (above, left) showed apron dresses splashed with cute, big-eyed manga girls and coquettish eyeball motifs. Thai brand Sretsis (above, right) arguably did kawaii better than the Japanese, and turned out signature flowery baby-doll dresses. The label is a staple on the streets of Harajuku. Mikio Sakabe pushed his fringe “pop-otaku” (anime geek) aesthetic to the extreme by casting only male models for his feminine collection. The cult of otaku is flirting with fashion more than ever before.

Tokyo Fashion Week

Another area in which Tokyo excels is menswear. Factotum is just a few eccentric details shy of being the next (N)umber (N)ine, and designer Koji Udo’s sleek pajama-party collection is already a hit among the city’s top buyers. On the other end of the spectrum is 99%IS (above, left). Now in its sophomore season, the label is already a fan favorite of streetwear aficionados. The house collaborated with Mackintosh on a number of rubberized motorcycle jackets, which climaxed in postapocalyptic cacophony when teamed with black plaster masks and aggressive studding.

One of the strongest shows was by local sportswear brand Onitsuka Tiger, which teamed up with Italian designer Andrea Pompilio for its first ready-to-wear collection. In a palette of black, white, and orange, it was racer-inspired but filled out with tailored suits that reflected the modern Tokyo man to a T.

If this is causing sensory overload, clean your palette with Dressedundressed (above, right), whose study on precise minimalism would make nineties-era Calvin Klein cry with jealousy. The Fall ’14 collection was inspired by Zen rock gardens. The lineup’s soft lines brought the week some cool harmony.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

The Next Big Thing: Faustine Steinmetz, Fall ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month rolls on, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

Faustine Steinmetz

Label: Faustine Steinmetz

Need to know: Parisian designer Faustine Steinmetz previewed Fall 2014, her third collection, this London fashion week in the NEWGEN showrooms in Somerset House. Steinmetz graduated from a starry Central Saint Martins MA class in 2011 that included Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida of Marques’Almeida, Phoebe English, and Maarten Van Der Horst. Since then she has worked steadily from her studio in East London, placing an emphasis on new and different ways of using yarn, shredding, curling, and embroidering her way to a unique fabric.

For Fall, Steinmetz turned her focus to hand-weaving, with a range of singular reworked garments that looked deceptively familiar. Up close, one Burberry-esque trenchcoat turned out to be a blend of rayon and copper, and what looked like classic blue jeans could in fact be scrunched together and adjusted to the body. “I wanted to reproduce the everyday pieces and give them an almost haute couture feel,” she told Style.com, grabbing a handful of mock-blue denim to demonstrate the pliability of the unusual weave. Steinmetz collects vintage Issey Miyake wares, and this collection was inspired by Miyake’s Pleats Please collections, particularly in how they blend wearability with the conceptual.

She says: “I love deformed things and the uncanny,” Steinmetz explained. “I think it’s really interesting when you see something that you know very well, but then it’s suddenly made in a different way. Anything that takes you a second to see and that challenges your perception fascinates me.”

Where to find it: LN-CC in London; Optitude and Isetan in Japan; and in the U.S., exclusively at Opening Ceremony.

Photo: Courtesy Photo