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April 19 2014

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13 posts tagged "Issey Miyake"

From Anime to Zen, Tokyo Fashion Week Had It All

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Tokyo Fashion Week

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tokyo closed on Saturday, just as the cherry blossoms were starting to paint the town pink. The fashion found on Tokyo’s Fall ’14 runways seemed more “Japanese avant-garde” than ever, but perhaps not in the way one might think. While the Japanese in Paris tend to be severe and dark, the inclinations of Tokyo’s catwalks lean more to the kawaii street movements that come with bright colors and catchy hooks of POP. Issey Miyake-backed brand Né-net (above, left) showed apron dresses splashed with cute, big-eyed manga girls and coquettish eyeball motifs. Thai brand Sretsis (above, right) arguably did kawaii better than the Japanese, and turned out signature flowery baby-doll dresses. The label is a staple on the streets of Harajuku. Mikio Sakabe pushed his fringe “pop-otaku” (anime geek) aesthetic to the extreme by casting only male models for his feminine collection. The cult of otaku is flirting with fashion more than ever before.

Tokyo Fashion Week

Another area in which Tokyo excels is menswear. Factotum is just a few eccentric details shy of being the next (N)umber (N)ine, and designer Koji Udo’s sleek pajama-party collection is already a hit among the city’s top buyers. On the other end of the spectrum is 99%IS (above, left). Now in its sophomore season, the label is already a fan favorite of streetwear aficionados. The house collaborated with Mackintosh on a number of rubberized motorcycle jackets, which climaxed in postapocalyptic cacophony when teamed with black plaster masks and aggressive studding.

One of the strongest shows was by local sportswear brand Onitsuka Tiger, which teamed up with Italian designer Andrea Pompilio for its first ready-to-wear collection. In a palette of black, white, and orange, it was racer-inspired but filled out with tailored suits that reflected the modern Tokyo man to a T.

If this is causing sensory overload, clean your palette with Dressedundressed (above, right), whose study on precise minimalism would make nineties-era Calvin Klein cry with jealousy. The Fall ’14 collection was inspired by Zen rock gardens. The lineup’s soft lines brought the week some cool harmony.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

The Next Big Thing: Faustine Steinmetz, Fall ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month rolls on, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

Faustine Steinmetz

Label: Faustine Steinmetz

Need to know: Parisian designer Faustine Steinmetz previewed Fall 2014, her third collection, this London fashion week in the NEWGEN showrooms in Somerset House. Steinmetz graduated from a starry Central Saint Martins MA class in 2011 that included Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida of Marques’Almeida, Phoebe English, and Maarten Van Der Horst. Since then she has worked steadily from her studio in East London, placing an emphasis on new and different ways of using yarn, shredding, curling, and embroidering her way to a unique fabric.

For Fall, Steinmetz turned her focus to hand-weaving, with a range of singular reworked garments that looked deceptively familiar. Up close, one Burberry-esque trenchcoat turned out to be a blend of rayon and copper, and what looked like classic blue jeans could in fact be scrunched together and adjusted to the body. “I wanted to reproduce the everyday pieces and give them an almost haute couture feel,” she told Style.com, grabbing a handful of mock-blue denim to demonstrate the pliability of the unusual weave. Steinmetz collects vintage Issey Miyake wares, and this collection was inspired by Miyake’s Pleats Please collections, particularly in how they blend wearability with the conceptual.

She says: “I love deformed things and the uncanny,” Steinmetz explained. “I think it’s really interesting when you see something that you know very well, but then it’s suddenly made in a different way. Anything that takes you a second to see and that challenges your perception fascinates me.”

Where to find it: LN-CC in London; Optitude and Isetan in Japan; and in the U.S., exclusively at Opening Ceremony.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Nipponista Lands in New York: Finally, a Pop-Up Store That’s Worth Visiting

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Nipponista Store

Come Thursday, Dover Street Market won’t be the only conceptual Japanese-centric retailer in town—Tokyo-based department store Isetan is bringing its Nipponista pop-up to Soho. “Isetan considers New York the hub of fashion in the business sense, and their ultimate goal is to open a permanent store,” said Kohsuke Miki, the creative director of the project. The weeklong pop-up is sponsored by both Isetan and the Japanese government’s Cool Japan initiative, through which the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry aims to promote Japanese products, craft, and technique abroad.

“For more than twenty years, there hasn’t been significant [Japanese] talent that actually surpasses the talent that existed before it,” Kohsuke said. “In the eighties there was Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto, and in the seventies there was Issey Miyake, Kansai Yamamoto, and Kenzo Takada.” Kohsuke believes that Nipponista, a cuter construct of the word Japanophile, is the right first step in establishing the new guard of Japanese creative talent and design.

Nipponista

Nipponista’s 2,000-square-foot space, which debuts exclusively here, features wares from some of the heritage brands Kohsuke mentioned—there’s a vintage Yohji Yamamoto ensemble, as well as choice pieces from Kansai Yamamoto’s latest collection (he revived his brand in 2013). But a coterie of designs from five emerging talents, who were commissioned to craft clothes in traditional Japanese indigo, or “Japanese blue,” is the centerpiece. Other fashion offerings include handmade sneakers from Hender Scheme, wearable embroidery from Maison des Perles, geometric jewelry from Shihara, delicate scarves from Suzusan, and garments from Anrealage and Yoko Chan, among others. Everything in the shop—even the giant window display of a teddy bear, which was constructed with hundreds of tiny balloons by artist duo Daisy Balloon—was made in Japan. Continue Reading “Nipponista Lands in New York: Finally, a Pop-Up Store That’s Worth Visiting” »

The Split-Second Preview: Issey Miyake

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The Fall ’14 menswear collections have marched down the catwalk in London, Florence, and Milan, and tomorrow, will kick off in Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Fall ’14 previews is available here.

Issey Miyake Fall '14

WHO: Issey Miyake, designed by Yusuke Takahashi

WHERE: Paris

WHEN: Thursday, January 16

WHAT: “The collection is inspired by natural elements (volcanic lava, aurora lights, and glaciers) found in the arctic terrain.”— Yusuke Takahashi. The designer sent us a snap of his iridescent Fall ’14 fabric, above .

Photo: Courtesy of Issey Miyake

The Split Second Preview: Issey Miyake

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The Spring ’14 collections are under way in Paris, and before their new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length previews at 140 characters or less. Our entire selection of Spring ’14 previews is available here.

Punching_Check

WHO: Issey Miyake, designed by Yoshiyuki Miyamae

WHERE: Paris

WHEN: Friday, September 27

WHAT: “Inspired by light illuminating the land through a break in the clouds. The collection features sharp silhouettes and hybrid textiles.” — Yoshiyuki Miyamae. The designer sent us a look at a Spring ’14 textile, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Issey Miyake