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32 posts tagged "Jack McCollough"

Jack And Lazaro, Live Now On SHOWstudio

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Starting at 11:45 a.m. (EST), SHOWstudio is live-streaming its latest “In Fashion” interview, with Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler. Is your boss standing behind you? If not, head here to tune in. (The nice part about our job? We’re tuning in because our boss is standing behind us!)

Photo: showstudio.com

Blasblog: Everybody Wants Acne

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I was blaming it on heat stroke and jet lag, but I thought my cocktail hour last night was a most curious adventure. I was running uptown to the Carlyle (fancy!) to celebrate the latest issue of a magazine from a denim label (that’s more downtown, no?) based in Sweden (that’s not exactly nearby). But up in the Royal Suite, the various factions were all represented: the uptown (the inimitable Anne Slater and Bob Colacello, left), the downtown (Jack and Lazaro from Proenza Schouler, Michael Stipe), the originally from out-of-town (Alexa Chung, Olivier Zahm, and the mag’s editor, Thomas Persson). And, of course, the Swedes, who are intimidatingly gorgeous. You don’t really realize how tall and blonde a girl like Caroline Winberg is until she’s in a room with you and the rest of the Western mortals—and for the record, not breaking a sweat. How? She’s a Swedish robot, for sure.

The point of this fête was the new issue of Acne Paper, the oversized fashion mag from the minds behind Stockholm’s Acne Studios. (Feel free to insert as many bad-skin puns and jokes here as you see fit; Alexa and I spent a good half hour doing it while harassing the barmen at the Carlyle to refill our glasses with ice-cold Champagne.) The magazine, with its profiles (of Stephen Jones, Cecilia Dean, Slater, and Colacello, among others) and portrait series of the most fabulous denizens of Paris, London, and New York, was a hot commodity—I didn’t even manage to snag one, and those who did weren’t letting it go. After cocktails, I ran into Lazaro at a birthday party in the private room of The Lion, where he was still clutching his copy. Who would have thought people would have wanted Acne that bad? (Sorry, I couldn’t resist. And for the record, that was Alexa’s joke.)

Photo: Greg Kessler

A Conversation With Loïc Prigent, Fashion Geek

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There’s fiction—Ugly Betty, The Devil Wears Prada. There’s “reality”—Project Runway, America’s Next Top Model, The Rachel Zoe Show, and so on, ad nauseum. Now comes reality. Tomorrow night, the Sundance Channel debuts The Day Before, a documentary series portraying the final hours before the Sonia Rykiel, Proenza Schouler, Fendi, and Gaultier Haute Couture fashion shows. Commanding access that should make the hair of any fashion aspirant stand on end, director Loïc Prigent takes pains to show the real life of fashion, as sublime, as surreal, as high-stakes and as prosaic as it is, day-to-day. Dresses unsewn mere minutes before the lights go up on the catwalk. Missing models. Technical mishaps. Whacked-out seamstresses staging a 1 a.m. runway show. Alongside The September Issue, the series effectively counterpunches the prevailing public image of fashion people as a community of shopaholic psychotics, replacing it with something richer, stranger, and—yes—realer. Prigent himself is no stranger to the scene behind the scenes: Together with Agnès Boulard, Prigent produces a popular fashion-themed show for French television, and he directed the the miniseries Signé Chanel and the documentary Marc Jacobs & Louis Vuitton, both of which previously aired on the Sundance Channel. This evening, the network fêtes The Day Before, and the multi-platform Full Frontal Fashion initiative it tentpoles, with a party hosted by Nathalie Rykiel and Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough of Proenza Schouler. Here, the director talks to Style.com about fashion geekdom, fur machismo, and filming for a nation of drama queens.

OK, I have to start by asking—how on earth did you convince these designers to let you and your camera crews in on their last-minute show preparations? That’s a high-pressure situation as is. And for that matter, how on earth did you convince Karl Lagerfeld and Marc Jacobs to let you follow them around—camera in tow—for months on end?

You know, I think the decisive moment, when I began really to have access to this world, was at the first show of Tom Ford for Yves Saint Laurent. Everyone else was filming the celebrities, but I had always one eye for Yves Saint Laurent, because he was there in the front row, and I was like, totally starstruck. And so I never panned to the movie stars, I just kept my camera rolling on Monsieur Saint Laurent. The mic was on, and I got Monsieur Saint Laurent saying to Bernard Arnault, “Monsieur Arnault, please get us out of this scam.” But in French, he used a very bad word—not a word you would expect out of Yves Saint Laurent. Of course, he was referring to Tom Ford coming to Yves Saint Laurent, and the Gucci Group buying the label, and he was upset about all this. A very revealing conversation. And everyone was like, “Oh my God, you can’t use that!” But to me, I mean, Monsieur Saint Laurent had never spoke about any of this in public, and it was such a great story, I had to use it. So, since then, it seems like people give me more access.
Continue Reading “A Conversation With Loïc Prigent, Fashion Geek” »

Up For Discussion: The Future Of Fashion Shows

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Fashion power players including Francisco Costa of Calvin Klein and Proenza Schouler’s Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough, along with a slew of top editors and retailers, joined CFDA president Diane von Furstenberg and executive director Steven Kolb this morning at FIT’s Katie Murphy Amphitheatre to discuss the future of New York fashion shows. “Are they relevant as we know them?” was the question at hand, and on the table were concerns about the timing and deliveries of collections and the money spent on expensive runway shows vs. the money made on less flashy, more lucrative pre-collections. Among the most contentious issues raised was what Donna Karan called a “white sale” mentality that’s training customers not to buy clothes and accessories at full price. In the spirit of problem solving, Vogue‘s Anna Wintour suggested that stores get together and set ground rules about when the discounting can start. When she was informed by von Furstenberg that that’s illegal, she replied: “Is that something we can change? We have friends in the White House now.” One topic that we’ll be keeping close tabs on for all of you Style Filers is the potential of fashion shows for consumers, in addition, that is, to shows for editors, buyers, and designers’ celebrity pals. Betsey Johnson, for her part, announced she’d be the first to sign up: “I would love to show at Madison Square Garden,” she said.

Photo: Bryan Bedder / Getty Images

Katherine Fleming Carries The Future

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If you spend enough time with designers, you quickly realize that many of them can’t resist test-driving the wares on which they’re currently working. In terms of fashion’s time-space continuum, that means they’re wearing today what they’ll be selling to you a year from now. At her first official trunk show last night at Tribeca’s Renwick Gallery—a double billing with her friend Megan Marrin’s jewelry line M. Graves—the talented young bag lady Katherine Fleming had such a piece tucked under her arm: a slightly oversized envelope in navy snake streaked with gray stripes. Season: Spring 2010. Fleming happily spilled that it will be priced very reasonably for an exotic skin—around $500. (I would definitely put that trip to Barneys or Opening Ceremony on your calendar!) In fact, Fleming’s upcoming spring range will feature quite a few pieces hovering around that sweet spot price, and without forsaking quality, either. “I’m still making everything in Italy,” Fleming explained. “I think it’s still possible to do that. I don’t want to move to China like everyone else.” Into the more distant future for Fleming is footwear. “I’m dying to do shoes,” she said. “But we want to wait until we’re in the right place and have the right partner.” Though that hasn’t stopped the shoe obsessive from sketching her interlocking-K logo into teetering sandals. But who designed the bondage-y black pair she wore last night with her ultrachic navy Marc Jacobs dress? “They’re from Zara,” she confessed, having bought them while in Florence for her Parsons’ schoolmates Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez’s show at Pitti W. “I’ve never gotten so many compliments on a pair of shoes,” Fleming added. “Even Lazaro asked me about them.”

Photo: Courtesy of Katherine Fleming