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April 16 2014

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14 posts tagged "James Long"

Three’s a Trend: In the Mesh

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Mesh looks from Christopher Raeburn, James Long, and Astrid Andersen

Here’s to a mild Spring in good old London Town. A trio of the city’s brightest young talents turned out options for the season that are—let’s say—not exactly weatherproof. Mesh, particularly on sleeves, hooked and needled its way down London’s Spring ’14 menswear catwalks.

James Long showed a sextet of BMX-influenced tops, including a contrast-zipped bomber fashioned entirely out of thunderstorm-gray netting (above, center). “It was based on the hell track, the cultlike attitude toward cycling clothes,” Long told Style.com, adding, “My mesh pieces would look really cool with an old band T-shirt—they’re easy to wear, and quite effortless.”

Eco-conscious Christopher Raeburn—long heralded for his creative, pop-bright spins on outerwear—offered a particularly fetching sweatshirt in oatmeal, sleeved in matching mesh (above, left). And lastly, mesh and webbing abounded in Copenhagen- and London-based Astrid Andersen’s Spring lineup. We particularly enjoyed this transparent green top (above, right), which the designer showed peeking out from beneath a white lace T-shirt. “My label has always been fixated on the athletic male and his obsession with the gym,” said Andersen. “The sheer material works well for our customer who loves to mix that expression with other brands.” An added bonus: In places, Andersen complemented her diaphanous duds with accents of Danish mink.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos/ InDigital/ GoRunway 

The Split-Second Preview: James Long

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The Spring ’14 menswear collections are under way in London, and they’ll continue with the shows at Florence’s Pitti Uomo, in Milan, and in Paris. Before their wares hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length previews at 140 characters or less. Our complete collection of Spring ’14 previews is available here.

James Long's Spring '14 Shoe

WHO: James Long

WHERE: London

WHEN: Tuesday, June 18

WHAT: “Welcome to the velodrome. Influenced by cycling, SS 14 has gloss, sweat, rubberized mesh, zips, hoods, satin and bonded lightweight leather.” —James Long. The designer sent us a snap of his Spring ’14 kicks, which were a collaboration with Kurt Geiger (above) as well as a peek at his mood board (below). Continue Reading “The Split-Second Preview: James Long” »

NEWGEN Men’s Lucky Seven

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NEWGEN Men's Spring 2014 winners

The British Fashion Council and Topman have awarded seven up-and-coming talents with NEWGEN Men sponsorship for the Spring ’14 season. First-time honorees include Agi & Sam (designed by Agape Mudmulla and Sam Cotton), Astrid Andersen, and Nasir Mazhar, while Matthew Miller, Lee Roach, Shaun Samson, and Martine Rose are returning NEWGEN veterans. The designers will receive funding to present their lines at the London Collections: Men, which kicks off June 16, and join the ranks of former winners like J.W. Anderson, James Long, and SIBLING.

Britain’s Boys Are Back in Town

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It’s been a big week for the London Collections: Men, with Rag & Bone and Pringle of Scotland announcing that they would join the likes of Tom Ford, Alexander McQueen, and Burberry in presenting during the city’s third menswear showcase this June. “I think London is pretty much the home of menswear. Look at Savile Row and the great heritage we have. We invented the suit!” said Dylan Jones—the editor in chief of British GQ and the chair of London’s men’s collections—at an event at the British Residence in New York last night. The occasion, which drew the likes of BFC chief executive Caroline Rush, Dominic Jones, Nasir Mazhar, Sibling’s Cozette McCreery, Lou Dalton, and more, marked the announcement of London’s Spring 2014 menswear schedule. The lineup includes the above-mentioned international brands, as well as talents like Christopher Kane, Richard Nicoll, and James Long. Long, fresh out of the London Showrooms, which visited New York this week, offered, “When I started menswear in London, we had to struggle to have a voice. It was very behind womenswear. Now, all these supportive people have made [London menswear] happen, and it’s so funny being in New York and having menswear be the focus.” Caroline Rush concurred. “The womenswear designers have great recognition, but to put that spotlight on these incredible menswear brands is really important,” she said.

One might wonder why the British Fashion Council chose to reveal the London menswear roster in Manhattan rather than on its home turf. “We’re here tonight…because so many New York designers have supported us since we launched 18 months ago,” said Jones in his speech, noting that Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, Tom Ford, and more had all lent a hand. He added that Tommy Hilfiger, David Furnish, Tracey Emin, and Details magazine will all be throwing “amazing” parties during the upcoming shows, which will run from June 16 to 18. “When [everyone] goes over to Milan, they’re going to have one hell of a hangover,” he laughed. The complete Spring 2014 London Collections: Men schedule is available at www.londoncollections.co.uk.

Photo: Charles Moriarty

Color, Texture and Print Reigned at the London Showrooms

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“I like a lot of embellishment and I like a lot of print,” said Holly Fulton. She might have been speaking for all her fellow English designers at the London Showrooms, the traveling, British Fashion Council-sponsored showcase which arrived in New York this week, following a stint in L.A. It’s almost a cliché that London designers trend bright and buzzy, but it’s become something of a calling card for the young talents nurtured by the BFC. To tweak the old saw, go big or stay home.

Fulton served up her groupie-inspired Fall collection, which featured lava-rock embellishments, hand-drawn prints, and a rather impressive dress constructed entirely of feathers. Others, like Simone Rocha (above), who’s currently selling stateside in Jeffrey and Opening Ceremony, offered less print but more color. Her key pieces were voluminous waffle-knitted neoprene looks in what she laughingly referred to as “Pepto pink.” Thomas Tait also played on unexpected fusion of spongy, bonded leather and quilted nylon in Day-Glo oranges and lime greens. “I feel like I’ve been shouting,” said Tait, whose line is also carried at Jeffrey. “I’ll be doing something mellower next season.”

Meanwhile, Fyodor Golan, designed by Fyodor Podgorny and Golan Frydman, balanced elegant, elaborately embellished print dresses with more playful leather pieces embossed with smiley faces. Turns out Smiley—the company that owns the rights to the icon—approached the duo for a collaboration, and they jumped at the chance to create, as Frydman put it, a “sexual smiley.” Another duo, Teatum Jones (that is to say, Catherine Teatum and Rob Jones) showed bright, seemingly tie-dyed dresses in perforated bonded jersey, as well as a few particularly interesting coats in latex-coated alpaca wool. Yet a third duo, Palmer//Harding, also in attendance, used a similarly clever technique on their wools to make them look like leather.

Men’s designers were on display, too, and they came with news to share. James Long whispered that half the designers showing on the Paris calendar had called to personal-order his sweater knitted with a giant picture of Divine. Agi Mdumulla and Sam Cotton of Agi & Sam had news of an offbeat football (read: soccer) and owl-inspired capsule collection they’ll launch at Topman next month. And jeweler Dominic Jones revealed he’ll show his first-ever men’s collection during June’s London Collections: Men. In the meantime, he was showing his mainline collection as well as his recently-launched lower priced range, DJ by Dominic Jones. “I wanted to make something that all my friends could afford,” he said when asked about the gold-plated and bright enamel collection of baubles, which average about $100 apiece.

Photo: Courtesy of the BFC