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August 31 2014

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6 posts tagged "James Turrell"

Exclusive: Calvin Klein Collection’s Pre-Fall Menswear

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Calvin Klein Collection Pre-Fall 2014 MenswearItalo Zucchelli, the creative director of Calvin Klein Collection’s menswear, was unexpectedly enthusiastic about a subject in fashion—at least in men’s fashion—that most prefer to ignore: pre-collections. “It’s kind of new for men,” Zucchelli said. Not long ago, the situation was much the same for womenswear: Pre-collections were commercial lines, meant to bolster store buys (in practice, they often make up to 70 percent, or more, of many retailers’ annual purchases) and distill the themes of the mainline “editorial” collections presented on the runway into more wearable, salable form. But anyone reading Style.com over the past few years has seen pre-collections boom, often into runway shows of their own. (See our complete coverage if you disbelieve.)

ould the same happen for menswear? Zucchelli, for one, makes such a thing seem possible. (His sales, he reports, are split fifty-fifty between pre-collections and Spring and Fall collections.) “The pre-collections became bigger and bigger,” he said. “Now I’m injecting fashion.” The Pre-Fall 2014 collection, debuting here, makes the point. The airy palette of the Spring ’14 collection, inspired in part by the work of James Turrell, turned darker, but blue remained dominant. Makes sense: Navy is a color no man is afraid to buy. But Zucchelli made good on his promise of more fashion in this traditionally sales-friendly offering. A bonded flannel car coat, easy and approachable, was spliced together with a panel of contrast fabric. “Techy” was Zucchelli’s word for it. That future-leaning, technological bent, which has characterized many of his collections for the label, was evident throughout: In the moire jacquard motif on suits and jackets, the slash details worked into the seams of tailored garments, and, most of all, the printed graphic sweatshirts and tees that the designer said were already attracting significant sales attention. They featured blue-tinted aerial illustrations of one of the world’s techiest cities: Tokyo.

Here, the exclusive debut of Calvin Klein Collection’s Pre-Fall 2014 menswear.

Photo: Dan Leccta

In L.A., Fashion Meets Art

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Wear LACMA

After two successful seasons, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is set to release its latest Wear LACMA campaign, with resident L.A. talents Greg Chait of The Elder Statesman and Jennifer Meyer (past designers include Gregory Parkinson, Libertine’s Johnson Hartig, Juan Carlos Obando, and NewbarK’s Maryam and Marjan Malakpour). The initiative conceived of by Katherine Ross, wife of LACMA director Michael Govan, and member of the museum’s Director’s Circle, challenged the two local designers to create limited-edition wares based on the museum’s permanent collection. “The goal of this initiative is to present works of art from the collection in a new way,” Ross said. “Through this partnership we are able to highlight extraordinary works in the museum’s encyclopedic collection seasonally.”

Of his contributions, Chait told us, “I love the spirit behind the project most.” After experiencing the museum’s James Turrell exhibit, he felt compelled to create six custom cashmere tees and scarves boasting abstracted Native American motifs. Meanwhile, Meyer, Chait’s fellow CFDA/Vogue Fashion Funder, was drawn to Ed Ruscha’s painting Made in California. With the artist’s express permission, Meyer created two nameplate necklaces bearing the moniker “Made in California” in 18-karat yellow gold and 18-karat gold with white diamond pavé. “I think LACMA is incredible, one of the best museums around,” the designer said of the institution that’s been enjoying a resurgence of late. “It’s incredibly exciting that LACMA chooses to partner with designers rather than “artists,” so to speak…combining those two worlds.” It would seem Net-a-Porter agrees with that sentiment, as the e-tailer will, for the first time, sell a selection of the Wear LACMA offering on its Web site. Proceeds from the collection, which ranges from $180 to $6,450, will benefit the museum.

Wear LACMA will be available beginning November 19 on net-a-porter.com and beginning November 20 in the LACMA store.

Photo: Courtesy of net-a-porter

Dior Doubles Down in the Name of Art

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Raf Simons, Elizabeth Olsen, Willy Vanderperre

“Of course I’m ready. Are you?” responded photographer Willy Vanderperre last night when asked if he was prepared for Dior’s two-night-in-a-row extravaganza at the Guggenheim. The house has underwritten this year’s international gala, which, set for this evening, celebrates artists James Turrell (his mesmerizing light installations were featured earlier this year) and Christopher Wool (whose paintings will be on view at the museum through January 22).

Yesterday evening served as an amuse bouche—or an amuse oreille, if you will—as the main event was an electro-deejay set by Plastikman. His beats were accented by a giant flashing LED pillar, which lit up the jam-packed space.

“This is one of the first places I visited when I came to New York many years ago,” offered Dior CEO, and this evening’s cochair (along with Raf Simons), Sidney Toledano. Olivier Theyskens, too, has a special relationship with the museum. “I used to look at it in books before I was able to come to New York,” the designer recalled. “I was always intrigued by its shell-like structure. And I remember when Nam June Paik put all those TVs on the floor. I wanted to jump from the ceiling!” he offered before giving Simons a hug. “I’m very impressed, seeing all of Wool’s work in one place,” said Simons, referring to the artist’s multilevel exhibition of black-and-white paintings. “He was a massive influence on a whole generation—on all the artists I kind of grew up with—so this is very well deserved. Bravo.”

In addition to guests such as Elizabeth Olsen, Gaia Repossi, Daria Strokous, Pat McGrath, and Guido Palau, How I Met Your Mother‘s Cobie Smulders turned out for the pre-party. Naturally, she was dressed in tip-to-toe Dior. “I’ve actually never been to the Guggenheim,” admitted the actress. “It’s kind of…amazing,” she gushed, looking out from the third floor of the rotunda. Smulders is flying off to Toronto this evening, so she won’t be joining Dior and co. for the gala. But Simons has his hosting duties cut out for him. Is the designer up for round two? “Always,” he said.

Photo: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com

Land of the Setting Sun

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Sunset looks from Fendi, Prada, and Calvin Klein

Milanese runways are feeling the heat, as troves of Italy’s presenters this menswear season have rendered sunset-inspired motifs on their wares, from ombré fadeaways to photo-realistic Atlantic twilights.

Calvin Klein‘s Italo Zucchelli showed a brilliant jumper aflame in solar fuchsia—a depiction of the view from his Fire Island summer home (above, right). Zucchelli also looked to James Turrell’s light sculptures—a timely nod, considering the artist’s much-hyped summer installation at New York’s Guggenheim Museum. Moschino, too, lensed a vivid, filmic gloaming on a range of bathing suits.

Dame Vivienne Westwood sent her boys to a sort of pan-global beach town, lending a sun-kissed casualness to her agitprop beat. One periwinkle-turned-rose-petal top caught our eye in particular. But it was Fendi‘s blur on a simple silken T-shirt that won the ombré challenge, hazily recalling a scorching desert (above, left).

And then there’s Prada (above, center). Miuccia gamely explored the underbelly of paradises then and now—spurring thoughts of wartime Vietnam (helicopters on the soundtrack) and seedy Honolulu racketeers. A series of bombers—heat-pressed with dusk-time littoral snapshots—perfectly encapsulated Prada’s ominous tropical sundown.

Photos: Yannis Vlamos/InDigital/GoRunway

Light Bright: James Turrell Opens at the Guggenheim

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James Turrell's Aten ReignFor the past fifty-some years, James Turrell has been manipulating light to dramatic—and quite often hallucinatory—effect. His magnum opus, for instance, the thirty-five-years-in-the-making (and counting) Roden Crater , turns Flagstaff’s volcanic crater into a celestial observatory. A recent work in Las Vegas gives CityCenter’s Louis Vuitton boutique a neon-lit makeover, and his latest effort, dubbed Aten Reign, converts Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic Guggenheim Museum into a mesmerizing neon-lit vortex.

“The show has been in development for about six years, and it was a very complicated construction and design process,” explained associate curator Nat Trotman from the base of the Guggenheim’s rotunda, which has been transformed into a spiraling, shimmering kaleidoscope of shifting color-fields. “This building is very idiosyncratic—you can’t just build anything here.”

The installation makes specific use of the Guggenheim’s soaring, elliptical curves and skylight, adding aluminum plates encased with PVC-covered LED lights to Wright’s base to give the space the feel of a giant, tripped-out lamp. Usually covered with art, the walls are stripped bare, and the viewer is left to look up and take in a seductive, hypnotizing loop of vibrant, alternating blues, greens, pinks, purples, and so on. And at the exhibition’s opening last night, guests such as Ralph Lauren, Francesco Clemente, Jenny Holzer, Laurie Simmons, and Agathe Snow wandered the museum’s ramps, sipping champagne while taking in the multicolored glow.

“Light is a powerful substance,” said Turrell. “We have a primal connection to it. I form it as much as the material allows…. My desire is to set up a situation to which I take you and let you see. It becomes your experience.”

James Turrell opens today at New York’s Guggenheim Museum and will run through September 25.

Photo: Scott Rudd