Style.com

September 2 2014

styledotcom Are you ready for #NYFW? Here's everything you need to know: stylem.ag/1A0QdZz

Subscribe to Style Magazine
11 posts tagged "Jane Birkin"

Legacy of Style: Fashionable Mother-Daughter Duos, Just in Time for Mother’s Day

-------

Mother's Day“You’re just like your mother.” Many women meet such a comparison with dread, but for those lucky enough to have ultra-stylish mums, it’s a compliment of the highest order. Who wouldn’t want to learn the art of getting dressed from an icon like Kate Moss, Jane Birkin, or Jerry Hall? Having good taste is a birthright for their respective daughters Lila Grace, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lou Doillon, and Georgia May Jagger, so it comes as no surprise that many of these girls have become fashion darlings in their own right. In honor of Mother’s Day this Sunday, we rounded up twenty of our favorite mother-daughter pairs. From the quintessentially French Roitfelds to the pinup-worthy Dellal clan to the edgy power duo that is Lisa Bonet and Zoë Kravitz, there’s plenty of multigenerational inspiration here.

Click for a slideshow of stylish mothers and daughters.

Julien Dossena Talks Paco Rabanne, Atto, and Paris’ Shifting Landscape

-------

Julien DossenaLVMH Prize finalist. Creative director of Paco Rabanne. Founder of the fledgling label Atto. French designer Julien Dossena is juggling a lot of roles this spring, but he was in New York last week wearing his Paco Rabanne hat. Dossena replaced Manish Arora at Rabanne early last year shortly after leaving Balenciaga, where he worked under Nicolas Ghesquière. By his own account, he has his work cut out for him at Rabanne. Outside of France and fashion circles, the brand is known for little more than perfume and men’s cologne, despite the late designer’s groundbreaking designs of the 1960s. Jane Fonda wouldn’t have been half as convincing as Barbarella without her Rabanne chain mail, and photos of pretty young things in his metal shifts encapsulate the futurism and free love of the era. But the company has floundered in recent years. “The image of the brand before was a bit blurry,” Dossena said. “Now we are taking back the reins.” Over lunch with Style.com, the designer talked Jane Birkin, Françoise Hardy, and why chain mail will always be essential.

How did Paco Rabanne sales go for Fall?We got opinion-leader kind of shops: Corso Como, Maria Luisa, The Webster, Blake, Just One Eye, Dover Street Market in New York and London. It’s a good start. And Barneys for the bags.

Did any piece in particular connect with buyers?We really wanted to emphasize a daywear wardrobe, but—there’s always a but—the stores need a bit of chain mail on the rack. People love it, they buy it. The challenge is to figure out how we can integrate chain mail into a daywear wardrobe.

As you say, the vision of the brand was blurry before. How do you intend to clear it up?
If women have only one Paco Rabanne dress in their closets, the brand isn’t going to develop. So we want to move away from the super-embroidered dresses that were the base of Rabanne before. We want to make it a classic brand for a younger customer. This season, we got the stores we need to deliver that commercial message. Now we’re working on our first pre-collection. We’re going to open our first shop in about a year and a half. Those are the first steps to having a strong brand.

Where will the shop be?
In Paris. Paco Rabanne is a classic from the sixties like Courrèges or Cardin. It can compete now with Balmain, Carven, those kinds of names. Paco Rabanne can be one of them. In France, Paco Rabanne is really deep in the culture. People love the name in France. I don’t know about America.

People who know fashion here know Jane Birkin and Françoise Hardy in the dresses—those cool metal dresses.
That’s what we want to bring back, that coolness that we love from those images. The question is how to translate those images into new product. If there’s a main word that we’re trying to do, it’s effortless.

To be a successful revival brand these days, you can’t just be about the past, right?
It has to be a balance of not losing the signature, but not being impressed by it, either—not being controlled by it. In five, six, seven years, Paco could become a lifestyle brand. Like if you travel, what kind of clothes do you want to wear? If you go to the countryside on the weekend, what do you want to take? I’m super-interested in that aspect and bringing that together with the visual futuristic signature of Paco Rabanne. It’s a good challenge. The good thing, I hope, is that we cleaned the image of the brand quite fast. And now we can move forward.

Paco Rabanne

No one was paying much attention to the label, but very quickly you seem to have caught people’s attention.
I hope. The name deserves it.

Do you think launching your own brand, Atto, at the same time as you signed on at Paco Rabanne has been helpful?
Yes. You learn so much on your own. When you launch your own brand, you have to be super-logical. Basically, it’s either you can do that or you can’t. That’s all. It teaches you not to be afraid to say, “OK, we can’t make a show? Don’t make a show.” But also to find the power in not making a show by really focusing on your products.

That’s what I wanted to do after I left Balenciaga. At Balenciaga I was working on the shows, and when you design clothes for a show it’s totally different than when you design for a customer. Paco Rabanne has taught me that a good basic with a little something more can be super-interesting. Each look has to go on a woman, has to be relevant.

But is it hard to manage two brands?
I just started wondering about that now. It happened randomly that I started Atto and Paco at the same time. I launched Atto in December [2012] just after Balenciaga. Then Paco called me for freelance in mid-January. Now that we’re adding pre-collection in Paco, I wonder what is the best way to keep the balance. At the end, the signature is me. Of course I have the Paco name to hold on to, but in the end, it’s what I think is good.

How is the Paco girl different from the Atto girl?
She’s different, but she’s still my girl. Maybe at Paco she’s more sensual, she’s more rich. At Atto, her look is more sharp, more clean.

Are you going to stick to showing Atto by appointment only during the pre-collections?
Yes, I don’t want it to go too fast or too big. I really want to take my time and enjoy it. To not put pressure on me or the collection. What I’d love to do is co-branding, or collaborations with people who have a specific technique or savoir faire, like Atto Mackintosh, Atto and Charvet shirts. That’s a dream. I love the Comme des Garçons model—you know the way they do those jackets with Barbour. I love that. They keep the essence of Barbour, but they add all their craziness and twists to it.

I’m almost afraid to do a show for Atto because I worry that I will lose the aim of Atto. Doing a show totally transforms your vision of your clothes. It makes you think about the casting, all these kinds of things. When I design Atto now, I say, “OK, is the girl going to be comfortable in that dress? What can she mix it with?” I’m afraid to lose that mix-and-match, modular feeling of Atto.

What about the LVMH award? You’re one of the twelve finalists, for Atto. Congratulations.
I was super-honored and super-happy. You know, in France, there is not much support for young designers and young brands. It’s really hopeful when you see that a big group like LVMH is looking at what young designers are doing. It’s a good thing. It means you are not playing anymore. It’s serious. If Atto doesn’t win, we already won, just to be part of the designer group. It’s quite an eclectic group of finalists. And I’m so happy it’s going on in Paris, you know, finally.

There is something moving. My friends and I are super-happy that J.W. Anderson is coming to Loewe, that Nicolas Ghesquière is coming to Vuitton. You can feel a good energy now in Paris.

Photo: Patrick Demarchelier; InDigital Images 

In Memoriam: Remembering Those Who Passed in 2013

-------

The new year is just around the corner, but before we move on to 2014, we pause to celebrate a few of the innovators who passed away this year. Below are some of the legends to whom we say good-bye.

In Memoriam: Remembering those who passed in 2013

Ottavio and Vittorio Missoni
There’s no denying the colorful imprint that Missoni has had, and continues to leave, on Italian fashion since it was first created by Italian impresario Ottavio Missoni and his wife, Rosita, in 1958. Having contributed to the rise of Italian ready-to-wear, Ottavio, ever the patriarch, peacefully passed this May at 92, having bequeathed the reigns of the family empire to his children, Angela, Luca, and the late Vittorio, in the nineties. Vittorio, formerly the CEO of Missoni, who was credited with bringing the brand and its signature zigzag knits global, tragically disappeared, at age 58, with his partner in a plane crash off the coast of Venezuela in January of this year.
Related: Ottavio Missoni R.I.P. and Vittorio Missoni Missing Off Coast Of Venezuela

Lou Reed Lou Reed, the dark horse of rock ‘n’ roll whose artistry and lyricism profoundly influenced various generations of musicians, came into the limelight in the sixties with the Velvet Underground. Reed’s prolific work, which extended into a solo career up until the point of his death (this October, in Long Island, of liver disease at 71), grasped the attention of artists and politicians, like Andy Warhol and Czech leader Václav Havel, as well as his contemporaries, from Bob Dylan to Metallica.

Peter Kaplan
As Style.com’s editor in chief, Dirk Standen, wrote, Peter Kaplan was inimitable. Kaplan was best recognized for his editorial prowess as the single longest-standing editor (fifteen years) of The New York Observer, and he set the tone for the media industry to follow by covering the cultish intrigue of New York City’s elite, politicians, and power brokers. His extensive career, which included working at Time magazine, The New York Times, and Charlie Rose, prior to his tenure at the Observer, last saw him as the editorial director of Condé Nast’s Fairchild Fashion Group, of which Style.com is a part. Kaplan, age 59, passed of lymphoma.
Related: Peter Kaplan, R.I.P.

Lilly Pulitzer
At 81, Lilly Pulitzer Rousseau, known simply as Lilly Pulitzer, which was also the name for her fashion line of chintzy, preppy print looks prevalent in Palm Beach, Florida (her base), and abroad, passed this April. The socialite-cum-designer began creating her tropical-inspired looks in the sixties and was oft quoted as saying, “It’s always summer somewhere.”
Related: Lilly Pulitzer Dies at 81

Deborah Turbeville
Deborah Turbeville, who passed in Manhattan at 81, in October of lung cancer, was one of fashion’s great photographic legends. Having assisted the late great lensman Richard Avedon, Turbeville worked as a fit model for Claire McCardell and saw a brief editorial stint at Harper’s Bazaar, before building her creative oeuvre on a commanding yet soft aesthetic with a dark and feminine mystique. Appearing everywhere from Vogue to W to The New York Times, her work radically defined imagery in the seventies.
Related: R.I.P. Deborah Turbeville and The Image Makers: Deborah Turbeville Continue Reading “In Memoriam: Remembering Those Who Passed in 2013″ »

On Our Radar: Seafarer

-------



Established in Brooklyn in 1900, Seafarer was the U.S. Navy’s leading supplier of bell-bottom denim work pants for over 80 years. But in the sixties and seventies, the likes of Brigitte Bardot, Jane Birkin, and Farrah Fawcett began to don their wide-legged, high-waisted jeans, as did other trendsetters who snatched up Seafarers at secondhand markets. Come January 22, you won’t have to scour vintage stores to find your pair—for Spring 2013, Seafarer is releasing a revamped fashion range, set to launch at Colette during the haute couture shows. Illustrator and blogger Garance Doré has created a trio of kitsch seventies films to help celebrate the revival, the first of which debuts here on Style.com (above). We’re not sure how well the Italian-made jeans, particularly the limited-edition floral-print pairs by Ken Scott, would be received by today’s Navy. But we’re betting the fashion set will be eager to get their sea legs.

Je T’aime—Moi Encore

-------

The eternal Serge Gainsbourg—the jug-eared Gallic crooner who has a good claim on being the twentieth century’s oddest heartthrob—rises again today, when a new biopic opens in New York. Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life is director Joann Sfar’s tribute to the late, great troubadour, who wrote frank songs of love and sex (“Soixante-Neuf, Année Erotique,” “Je T’Aime—Moi, Non Plus,” “Les Sucettes,” and more) and seduced (and duetted with) many of France’s most gorgeous women, including Brigitte Bardot, Anna Karina, and the namesake of the Hermès Birkin, Jane Birkin. These days, Gainsbourg is better remembered for his amours, his antics (see his notorious TV appearance from the eighties alongside a young Whitney Houston , which is not quite safe for work), and for his gorgeous, fashion-favorite daughter Charlotte than for his music, which is a shame. Style-worlders may make haste to the theater to see Gainsbourg (which won its star, Eric Elmosnino, a Best Actor trophy at the Tribeca Film Festival) to catch Laetitia Casta as Bardot, but top it off with a visit to the iTunes store for the man’s own work. My recommendation? Jane Birkin/Serge Gainsbourg, their duets album from (when else?) 1969.

Photo: Courtesy of One World Films