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April 19 2014

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9 posts tagged "Jane Birkin"

In Memoriam: Remembering Those Who Passed in 2013

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The new year is just around the corner, but before we move on to 2014, we pause to celebrate a few of the innovators who passed away this year. Below are some of the legends to whom we say good-bye.

In Memoriam: Remembering those who passed in 2013

Ottavio and Vittorio Missoni
There’s no denying the colorful imprint that Missoni has had, and continues to leave, on Italian fashion since it was first created by Italian impresario Ottavio Missoni and his wife, Rosita, in 1958. Having contributed to the rise of Italian ready-to-wear, Ottavio, ever the patriarch, peacefully passed this May at 92, having bequeathed the reigns of the family empire to his children, Angela, Luca, and the late Vittorio, in the nineties. Vittorio, formerly the CEO of Missoni, who was credited with bringing the brand and its signature zigzag knits global, tragically disappeared, at age 58, with his partner in a plane crash off the coast of Venezuela in January of this year.
Related: Ottavio Missoni R.I.P. and Vittorio Missoni Missing Off Coast Of Venezuela

Lou Reed Lou Reed, the dark horse of rock ‘n’ roll whose artistry and lyricism profoundly influenced various generations of musicians, came into the limelight in the sixties with the Velvet Underground. Reed’s prolific work, which extended into a solo career up until the point of his death (this October, in Long Island, of liver disease at 71), grasped the attention of artists and politicians, like Andy Warhol and Czech leader Václav Havel, as well as his contemporaries, from Bob Dylan to Metallica.

Peter Kaplan
As Style.com’s editor in chief, Dirk Standen, wrote, Peter Kaplan was inimitable. Kaplan was best recognized for his editorial prowess as the single longest-standing editor (fifteen years) of The New York Observer, and he set the tone for the media industry to follow by covering the cultish intrigue of New York City’s elite, politicians, and power brokers. His extensive career, which included working at Time magazine, The New York Times, and Charlie Rose, prior to his tenure at the Observer, last saw him as the editorial director of Condé Nast’s Fairchild Fashion Group, of which Style.com is a part. Kaplan, age 59, passed of lymphoma.
Related: Peter Kaplan, R.I.P.

Lilly Pulitzer
At 81, Lilly Pulitzer Rousseau, known simply as Lilly Pulitzer, which was also the name for her fashion line of chintzy, preppy print looks prevalent in Palm Beach, Florida (her base), and abroad, passed this April. The socialite-cum-designer began creating her tropical-inspired looks in the sixties and was oft quoted as saying, “It’s always summer somewhere.”
Related: Lilly Pulitzer Dies at 81

Deborah Turbeville
Deborah Turbeville, who passed in Manhattan at 81, in October of lung cancer, was one of fashion’s great photographic legends. Having assisted the late great lensman Richard Avedon, Turbeville worked as a fit model for Claire McCardell and saw a brief editorial stint at Harper’s Bazaar, before building her creative oeuvre on a commanding yet soft aesthetic with a dark and feminine mystique. Appearing everywhere from Vogue to W to The New York Times, her work radically defined imagery in the seventies.
Related: R.I.P. Deborah Turbeville and The Image Makers: Deborah Turbeville Continue Reading “In Memoriam: Remembering Those Who Passed in 2013″ »

On Our Radar: Seafarer

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Established in Brooklyn in 1900, Seafarer was the U.S. Navy’s leading supplier of bell-bottom denim work pants for over 80 years. But in the sixties and seventies, the likes of Brigitte Bardot, Jane Birkin, and Farrah Fawcett began to don their wide-legged, high-waisted jeans, as did other trendsetters who snatched up Seafarers at secondhand markets. Come January 22, you won’t have to scour vintage stores to find your pair—for Spring 2013, Seafarer is releasing a revamped fashion range, set to launch at Colette during the haute couture shows. Illustrator and blogger Garance Doré has created a trio of kitsch seventies films to help celebrate the revival, the first of which debuts here on Style.com (above). We’re not sure how well the Italian-made jeans, particularly the limited-edition floral-print pairs by Ken Scott, would be received by today’s Navy. But we’re betting the fashion set will be eager to get their sea legs.

Je T’aime—Moi Encore

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The eternal Serge Gainsbourg—the jug-eared Gallic crooner who has a good claim on being the twentieth century’s oddest heartthrob—rises again today, when a new biopic opens in New York. Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life is director Joann Sfar’s tribute to the late, great troubadour, who wrote frank songs of love and sex (“Soixante-Neuf, Année Erotique,” “Je T’Aime—Moi, Non Plus,” “Les Sucettes,” and more) and seduced (and duetted with) many of France’s most gorgeous women, including Brigitte Bardot, Anna Karina, and the namesake of the Hermès Birkin, Jane Birkin. These days, Gainsbourg is better remembered for his amours, his antics (see his notorious TV appearance from the eighties alongside a young Whitney Houston , which is not quite safe for work), and for his gorgeous, fashion-favorite daughter Charlotte than for his music, which is a shame. Style-worlders may make haste to the theater to see Gainsbourg (which won its star, Eric Elmosnino, a Best Actor trophy at the Tribeca Film Festival) to catch Laetitia Casta as Bardot, but top it off with a visit to the iTunes store for the man’s own work. My recommendation? Jane Birkin/Serge Gainsbourg, their duets album from (when else?) 1969.

Photo: Courtesy of One World Films

Lutz & Patmos, With A Little Help From Their Friends

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Before “designer collaboration” became fashion’s second-most frequently dropped phrase (immediately following “pop-up shop,” by our count), Tina Lutz and Marcia Patmos were doing just that—calling up friends and fans and working with them on limited-edition items in their ultra-soft cashmere. It helps that the designers have more catholic tastes than most. Over the course of their guest designers series, they worked with everyone from Carine Roitfeld to architect Richard Meier to Archbishop Desmond Tutu, all of whom waxed philosophic about the sweaters of their dreams and helped to make them a reality. Lutz & Patmos is shutting up shop, sad to say—Patmos will continue on as M. Patmos, as well as designing the more contemporary Leroy & Perry collections, and Lutz will pursue other projects—but before they go, they’ve rounded up the collabs of years past, which are now on sale at their e-commerce site. From Roitfeld’s (modeled, top left, by the editrix herself, and son Vladimir Restoin-Roitfeld) to Christy Turlington’s (top right, inspired by the yogic lotus flower), Fabien Baron’s (top left), and Inez van Lamsweerde’s (top right), they’re available now for, potentially, the last time ever. Shop brisk—and click below for pieces by Jane Birkin, and Natalia Vodianova. Continue Reading “Lutz & Patmos, With A Little Help From Their Friends” »

On Our Radar: Bensimon Sneakers

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I admit it: I’m getting a little tired of all the trembling talk about “investment pieces.” While I’m all for a justifiably (perhaps) expensive (definitely) item to have and to hold—and certainly for making smart, timeless purchases of lasting pieces—there’s something refreshing about a good old affordable buy. France’s Bensimon sneakers fit that bill nicely. Explicitly designed as “disposable footwear,” the low-top kicks were picked up by everyone from Princess Diana to Jane Birkin after they were introduced in Europe. A few colors have been available in the U.S., but this season marks the debut of the full 21-shade palette. That means there’s now one to go with just about anything. I wouldn’t go so far as to call them disposable, but at $58 a pair, you can go ahead and invest—i.e., buy two.
Coming next week to Tani. For more information, visit www.taninyc.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Bensimon