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August 29 2014

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138 posts tagged "Jason Wu"

Resort ’15: Highs and Polos

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poloWhether or not you live according to The Official Preppy Handbook or have strong opinions about popped collars, if you’ve been following the Resort collections, you’ll recognize that designers are championing polos in a major way. Of course, the ones they’re showing are anything but basic. Jason Wu paired a clingy knit style with a slit pencil skirt to sexy effect, while Derek Lam riffed on the sporty staple by adding military-inspired epaulets at the shoulders. A pair of sunny yellow piqué looks turned up at Reed Krakoff and Band of Outsiders, and Nicolas Ghesquière sent a flashy lamé version down his Louis Vuitton Cruise runway. Polos are turning up in the streets, too, on tastemakers like David Beckham and Rihanna, who was spotted courtside at a Clippers basketball game in Céline’s ribbed Spring ’14 dress. Take it from RiRi, you can and should mess with a classic.


Here, a slideshow of stylish polos.

EXCLUSIVE: Jason Wu Unveils His Debut Campaign for Hugo Boss

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Hugo Boss
Hugo Boss

Though he worked with the same megawatt team of photography duo Inez & Vinoodh and stylist Joe McKenna, Jason Wu had an easier time shooting his first Fall ’14 Hugo Boss campaign than he did lensing his This Is Boss film for the brand back in January—probably because this time around, there was no blizzard to deal with. Debuting exclusively here, Wu’s inaugural ads for the German house star Edie Campbell (who emerged as Wu’s muse when Wu presented his first Boss collection back in February) and Scott Eastwood. Yes, the ruggedly handsome son of Clint. “It was very important that the first campaign was character-driven,” Wu told Style.com. “Edie Campbell not only stands for the new vision of Boss womenswear, but she is the definition of that confident, sexy, and individual person that I would like the collection to reflect.” As for the menswear snaps, he offered, “The idea of Boss menswear is keeping up tradition. Scott is all about channeling old Hollywood. I love how much he looks like his father, who is absolutely legendary, and he has this classic sensibility that feels completely modern at the same time.”

The photographs are stern and simple—no fancy backdrops or locations this time around—but they’re jam-packed with emotion. That duality is integral to Wu’s Boss aesthetic. “The pictures are so strong that they didn’t need any special layout. They’re just fully focused on the [model], the clothes, and the attitude. It’s about personality within a very rigorous sensibility. And it’s important to have both.”

Photo: Inez & Vinoodh, Courtesy of Hugo Boss

Jason Wu Curates for a Cause

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Bruce Weber

On June 11, Jason Wu will merge good art with a good cause when he hosts the Second Annual Young Friends of ACRIA Summer Soirée. But his involvement with the AIDS research and education foundation goes far beyond turning up at the benefit and smiling for Billy Farrell. “I want to help pave the way for my generation to get involved,” said Wu, who sits on ACRIA’s board. “I love what ACRIA does, and it’s great for me to be able to work with people I admire, like Francisco Costa and Donna Karan.”

In order to help raise funds for the organization, the designer has put together an extensive auction of photographs (fashion and otherwise), the proceeds from which will naturally go to ACRIA. “Last year I collaborated with artist Nate Lowman on T-shirts, and I wanted to continue the art-and-fashion element,” said Wu. “So I thought it would be nice to curate a collection of photographs by young and established photographers that I admire.”

Inez & Vinoodh; Herb Ritts

Open for bidding now on paddle8.com, the auction includes Inez & Vinoodh’s Guinevere Descending a Staircase; Herb Ritts’ 1991 portrait of a pensive Karl Lagerfeld; and Bruce Weber’s erotic snap Gregory and Sacha, Nantucket, Mass, 2012, as well as works by up-and-comers, like Kevin Tachman’s moody shot from Rick Owens’ Fall ’13 show, Kelly Klein’s punk-tinged image, and Gregory Harris’ uplifting 2008 photograph New Hope.

Rick Owens“I’d like the younger generation of creative people to be able to afford and have these things,” offered Wu. To wit, starting bids range from $400 (for Simon Burstall’s grayscale image) to $6,000 (for a Weber or Steven Meisel). Sure, it’s no small investment, but these are pretty appealing prices when it comes to big-name photographers. “This is a great way for people who are really interested in collecting to get an incredible work that most people in their 20s and 30s wouldn’t be able to buy.” A collector as well as a philanthropist (his latest acquisition was an Inez & Vinoodh-lensed print of his Spring ’14 campaign with Karen Elson), Wu places himself in this category. “I’ll definitely be bidding on everything!” he laughed. Why not join him?

Photos: Bruce Weber, Inez & Vinoodh, Herb Ritts; Kevin Tachman; all courtesy of paddle8.com

Grads Show Promise at the Annual Parsons Fashion Show

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Parsons

“You never leave Parsons,” Simon Collins said from his perch onstage at Wednesday’s fourth annual Parsons Fashion Show. His statement rang true, because yesterday’s show was just as much about the Parsons family as it was about showing off the graduating seniors’ final collections. Editors, photographers, and an endless wave of students crowded into the school’s state-of-the-art University Center at 63 Fifth Avenue, where Milk Studios’ Mazdack Rassi and Parsons alum Chris Benz spoke about their experiences with the school, the importance of having a point of view, and how the brand-new facilities are far superior to the “dump” Parsons used to occupy in Midtown. A series of videos also played in between mini fashion shows, with cameos from Donna Karan, Anna Sui, and Style.com’s Dirk Standen.

“Parsons is all about collaborating,” Collins said. He was referring to the school’s own collaborations, which range from an Allen Edmonds capsule collection to the Parsons/Kering “Empowering Imagination” Competition, which is featured on Style.com this week. “If you’re a brand or you work for a brand, you know you can’t really guarantee being on the homepage of Style.com,” Collins said. “But Parsons can.” You could tell that these BFA students are born collaborators, too. They showed a firm grasp of the current market, sending out boxy coats à la Proenza Schouler; layered knits that called to mind Burberry’s Fall ’14 show; and even Fendi-inspired luxe fur accents, like those on Wenqi Wu’s covetable sheared tunic. We would wear those pieces tomorrow. Each student had a defined point of view—Ximon Lee cites the clothes of Russian street children as his starting point—but at the same time, the show felt cohesive. Not an easy feat. These students spent four years (or more) playing off of each others’ ideas and aesthetics to finish with a range of high-quality, very impressive final projects. You could picture them being an asset to any design team—although many dream of becoming the next Marc Jacobs, Jason Wu, Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez, or Anna Sui, all Parsons alums who are still very connected to the school. Following the students’ upcoming graduation, we can see why they won’t want to leave the clan.

Photo: Courtesy of Parsons the New School for Design 

“RuPaul Is Kind of the Ultimate Supermodel,” and More Musings From Parsons Honoree Jason Wu

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Jason Wu

With his Hugo Boss debut and thriving eponymous line, Jason Wu is having a banner year. So it comes as little surprise that the 31-year-old Taiwanese-Canadian designer is picking up the top honor at Parsons’ 2014 Fashion Benefit, which is set for tomorrow evening. Ahead of the festivities, Wu, who’s both a Parsons alum and—fun fact—a former toy designer, took time away from wrapping his forthcoming Resort collection to speak with Style.com about his secrets to success, New York fashion’s changing landscape, and his obsession with RuPaul.

Congratulations on the Parsons honor. Considering you studied at the school, do you feel you’ve come full circle?
I’ve kind of come full circle because I moved here in 2001 for my first year at Parsons. So it’s nice to go back and be a part of this new generation of the school, which has taught me a lot and done so much for me. It’s a very nice honor and I’m very proud. But I don’t think I’ve made it—at all. I think I’ve hit a nice moment in my career and it feels great to have your peers and people in your industry acknowledge your work. But that’s not to say that there’s not much more work to do.

Between your debut at Hugo Boss, the success of your own line, and now this award, it seems that you’ve really hit your stride this year.
I don’t know. I always think there’s more to do, so I never think I’ve hit my stride. I always want more and want to do more, but certainly I think it’s been a great year so far, having done two shows in New York for the first time, and then getting this award. I guess that comes with age and experience and just doing it for a while. And I guess I’m getting a little better at it.

Do people look at you differently now that you’ve become the big man at Boss?
I don’t know if I’ve knocked it out of the park yet, but I think we had a really successful first show and I guess people look at me a little more like a grown-up, a big person.

Do you feel like a grown-up?
Yeah, I feel a little older. I guess that means grown-up. Definitely achier.

Jason Wu

Your Boss show was quite the star-studded event, and Jennifer Lawrence just wore a gown from your Fall collection to the world premiere of X-Men: Days of Future Past. What role does celebrity dressing play in a designer’s success?
Having people you admire wear your clothes in a very public way is inspiring, and it’s also a great way to get your work out there. It’s a great form of advertising. But for me it’s always about quality, not quantity, and it’s about dressing the few girls that I love. I’ve always been very loyal to Diane Kruger, Reese Witherspoon, Rachel Weisz, Michelle Williams, Kerry Washington—those are girls I dress over and over and over again. And you really develop a rapport and a friendship and a relationship. It goes back to the days when Givenchy and Audrey Hepburn, and Catherine Deneuve and Yves Saint Laurent, had those relationships that went [beyond commerciality]. Those were true relationships. It’s great to continue that tradition.

Can a young designer make it these days without a celebrity bump?
Everyone does it differently. There are some people who make clothes that are more appropriate for a red carpet and there are some people who don’t. I’m not sure if it’s a do-or-die situation, but you do have to seek exposure in your own way, in a way that’s right for your brand.

Jennifer LawrenceHow did you come to dress Jennifer Lawrence for her X-Men premiere? Was that a big moment for you?

Yeah. Actually, we just found out [the day before]. I had no idea. I think there’s something so incredibly human about her. That’s why people love her so much—she’s so relatable. She shows a little imperfection—which we all have—and still looks stunning.

You mentioned that people like seeing imperfection in public figures. With that in mind, people seem to like you a lot. What’s your imperfection?

My imperfection is that I’m not as perfect as people seem to think I am. There’s a sense of controlled, sophisticated ideas in my clothes that are quite neat, and I think people sometimes think I’m that, but I’m not.

Are you messy?
I’m actually not messy. I’m terrible at waking up early. I’m terrible at a lot of things. I’m terrible at technology—anything computer-oriented. And I’m terrible at making anything on time, which I’m really working on. Actually, at Parsons, I was always really late, and you can’t be late at Parsons. You really get into trouble.

You, along with Alexander Wang, Prabal Gurung, Joseph Altuzarra, etc., are part of New York’s new guard. How do you think the creative climate here is changing?
Right now, New York fashion week is at its best. We have the most young talent [succeeding] at the same time for the first time in a long, long while, and this is the first time that we’ve really been acknowledged on an international level in a long time. That has to do with the fact that our generation’s outlook is global, rather than local. If you look at Style.com, you can read that anywhere in the world. That certainly helps. Having that kind of recognition all over the world is something that is quite rare. We’re experiencing something of a moment, a movement.

Why is that, do you think?
It is, in so many ways, New York’s time. All [of the young designers] in New York come from different international backgrounds. I think that’s a very nice representation of what New York fashion is about—it’s about diversity; it’s about fresh ideas; it’s about making its own statement, because we don’t have the hundreds of years of history. We’re really still, as a whole, quite new at it.

Jason Wu Fall 14

Do you remember how you felt when you were designing your Parsons graduate collection?
It’s so funny because I went to Parsons and my major was menswear, yet I make the most fit-and-flare dresses you could possibly imagine. I guess after going to the very masculine side, I felt like I was much more comfortable in the very feminine side, and eventually the combination of the two became my work as we know it today.

Why were you initially drawn to menswear?
I always liked the idea of tailoring. I always felt making a jacket was the most difficult thing, and it is still the most difficult. Sometimes the cleanest things with the least amount of details are the most intricate.

What do fashion students need to know that isn’t necessarily taught in school?
It’s that the fashion industry isn’t by-the-books. It’s not about following one specific route, it’s about paving your own way and making it your own. That’s what makes fashion interesting—individual visions—and not one person breaks through in the same way. We all get into it slightly differently—I worked in toys first.

Speaking of toys, I read that back in the day, you did a RuPaul doll?
I worked with RuPaul once! It was a long time ago. We made a RuPaul doll and it was wildly successful and that’s how I met him. Of course, RuPaul’s Drag Race is my favorite show ever. It’s like the best show on television. RuPaul is kind of the ultimate supermodel, and I have an obsession with supermodels.

Jason Wu RuPaul

Does your former life as a toy designer ever inform your fashion designs?
Attention to detail is what links my work as a toy designer and a fashion designer. Most people say I went from dressing toy dolls to real dolls. That’s kind of the press-y version of it. But in actuality, I did everything from designing the sculptural form of the dolls to the industrialization of the molds to the manufacturing. I always knew how to create a really good product, and I think that experience primed me for this industry.

How important has business savvy been to your success?
The balance between creativity and business-savvy is something that every young designer needs to be aware of, because it’s the reality of our industry. Having that balance is something that my generation of New York designers really thinks about.

What is your advice to fashion students who want to be the next Jason Wu?
I don’t know if they do want to be the next Jason Wu! But my advice is seize every opportunity and work hard. It sounds so obvious to say that, but the glamour of the industry can get distracting sometimes, and at the end of the day it’s about the work. I work weekends all the time—there’s no such thing as overtime for me because my own time is overtime. And I don’t have any vacations, so cancel those family plans.

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com; Leandro Justen/BFANYC.com; FilmMagic; Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com; Getty Images