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July 25 2014

styledotcom Vacationing vicariously through this Raf Simons top: stylem.ag/Uy3oTS pic.twitter.com/67uWJGvOrs

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7 posts tagged "Jean-Michel Basquiat"

Remembering Basquiat—Nude and Otherwise

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RECLINING NUDE: JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT Photographs by PAIGE POWELL

“It wasn’t my idea to do this,” explained photographer and curator Paige Powell. “I didn’t want to face it.” The artist is talking about her new exhibition, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Reclining Nude, which opened at the Suzanne Geiss Company on Grand Street last night. The photographs on display, grainy black-and-whites blown up to massive scale from negatives that were untouched for three decades, depict Basquiat lounging nude while sketching in his Upper West Side apartment. Powell’s work captures a moment of intimacy between she and Basquiat—one of many the pair shared during their two-year relationship at a time when Powell ran with Andy Warhol (she started working at Interview magazine just a couple of weeks after moving to New York in 1980) and his crowd of Factory regulars.

“I had so many photographs—prints, video, Polaroids—and they had all gone into boxes, so nothing was referenced, very little was dated,” continued Powell, stopping to greet friends including Gus Van Sant, David LaChapelle, Rufus Wainwright, and Isabel Toledo. “When I came across these, I wasn’t sure if I should show them. I thought, ‘What would Jean-Michel think? He would love these.’”

“Paige was always wired to be a little more conscious of the moment at hand or what it meant—with Andy, with everything,” mused longtime pal, curator and fellow Warholite Carlo McCormick. “I never hung out with Jean naked,” he added. “I only hung out with him doing drugs. But I think it’s nice that she’s conveyed something really intimate on a big scale. It’s a space that you don’t often share.”

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Reclining Nude is on view at Suzanne Geiss Company in New York through February 22.

Photo: Patrick McMullan Company

Draw Something: Fashion Illustration Takes the Spotlight

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Illustrations by David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

Last night in London, Christie’s South Kensington auction house played host to an exhibition and discussion orchestrated by the Fashion Illustration Gallery (FIG). And while the audience sat through the Issa London-sponsored talk, whose panel included Christie’s Meredith Etherington-Smith, illustrator David Downton (whose work is pictured above, top left), and Style.com’s Tim Blanks, they were left wondering: Should astute art investors buy up fashion illustration in the same way the world should have snatched up early Basquiat or Koons? “Before Andy Warhol was Andy Warhol, he was a fashion illustrator,” said Etherington-Smith. “Fifty years ago, the art world debated whether photography was a bona fide art form, and the same is happening now with fashion illustration. I believe there is no doubt fashion illustration is an art, but a vastly underappreciated one.”

The art on display last night represented the old guard like Cecil Beaton, Antonio Lopez (above, bottom left), and Andy Warhol, as well as such new talents as Gary Card (above, top right), Zoë Taylor (above, bottom right), and Tanya Ling. Strange bedfellows? Not according to Downton. “Some of the younger fashion illustrators out there are the most skilled draftsmen,” he said. “They very much should take their place alongside the great artists of days gone.”

Among the questions thrown out to an audience that included Suzy Menkes, Camilla Al Fayed, and Susie Bubble: Will fashion illustration ever be accepted as an art form? And will magazine editors ever replace celebs for illustrations? Downton, perhaps, answered these queries best. “The illustration I did a few years back of Cate Blanchett for Australian Vogue was, against all odds, the fastest-selling issue of the year. It also won the Maggie’s Magazine Cover of the Year. After that, there was no doubt for me that there is a place in the art world for fashion illustration.”

FIG’s exhibition at Christie’s South Kensington runs through December 19.

Illustrations: David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book

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Andy Warhol 
From Warhol’s Factory to Basquiat’s studio, throughout the eighties, downtown Manhattan was the place for young creative types to be. Photographer Jeannette Montgomery Barron was there, and her new tome, Scene, is a sort of yearbook of the time, documenting the likes of Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, Francesco Clemente, Willem Dafoe, and more early in their careers. “I was just a fly on the wall,” recalls Montgomery Barron, speaking at Indochine, one of her old haunts. (“It looks almost exactly the same, but there were a lot of drugs happening in the bathrooms back then.”) This afternoon, she’ll sign copies of Scene—which, in addition to the snaps, features personal anecdotes about each artist—at Bookmarc, and starting tomorrow, a select group of her black-and-white photographs will be on display in an exhibition at ClampArt. Here, Montgomery Barron discusses her book, and reminisces about shooting Warhol, working out with Bianca Jagger, and spending time with Basquiat.

 

How did you find yourself in the center of the eighties New York art scene?  

I was just lucky. It’s not that I went out and said, “I want to record every artist from A to Z.” It was more like I’d photograph Francesco Clemente, and he’d say, “You should really go photograph my friend Kenny Scharf.” It was very organic in that way. And, I mean, I knew I could drop a name. I’m sure I said, “Hey, I’m a friend of Andy Warhol. Can I shoot you?” I guess I’d get an adrenaline surge.

 

In the book, you mention that you could just call up Andy Warhol and ask to take his picture. What were those sittings like?  

The first time I photographed him was at the Factory in Union Square, and he wouldn’t even let me out of the outer lobby. When I met Bianca Jagger and we became friends, he warmed up. He never really talked much, but he always made you feel like you were the most brilliant person who said the most profound things. Continue Reading “See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book” »

On Our Radar: GLASS

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GLASS swimwearWhen it comes to swimwear for gents, there’s a new kid on the beach, repping a hip breed of shoreline swagger: New York City’s GLASS. “I kept thinking, What would both Gianni Agnelli and Jean-Michel Basquiat wear [to the pool]?” founder John Glass told Style.com. The designer, who grew up between New York, Martha’s Vineyard, and London whilst studying history and, as of late, working in branding at Tom Ford, is a man of varied interests. While in the U.K., he hung out with a Savile Row crew—even tagging along on trips to tweed mills in Scotland, obsessively educating himself on tailoring along the way. “I started the line because I felt that swimwear is like a blank canvas, allowing for creativity and originality across one product,” says Glass. His swimsuits are a departure from the formal three-piece looks of his past, but the designer’s wares boast a wide scope of studied, albeit quirky, prints, like a lo-fi Crayon Paisley and an Egyptian-funky Hieroglyphic Stripe. “Wear them anywhere you want to be happy,” suggests Glass. “From a sailboat in the Mediterranean to a hot day in NYC.” Glass debuted his line only last month, but he’s already planning for next season—keep your eyes peeled for potential pop-ups at Art Basel in Miami and Rio’s Carnival.

 

GLASS’s new trunks are available, starting today, on Moda Operandi.

Photos: Courtesy of GLASS

Fame For Sale

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Art and celebrity, celebrity artists, the art of celebrity—it’s all a big blur. But an intriguing blur, nonetheless. Starting tomorrow, online auction house Paddle8 will play to our fascination with art, celebrity, and everything in between with Somebody, a fame-themed sale. Launching in collaboration with Interview magazine (i.e., the magazine that Andy Warhol—the grandfather of celebrity/art cross-pollination—founded), the auction will offer 40 celeb-centric works by the likes of Richard Avedon, Mario Testino, Richard Prince, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Warhol himself, and more. You can browse the sale, and its famous faces, until it ends on March 27.

Photo: Andy Warhol’s 1977 Photograph of Arnold Schwarzenegger, courtesy of Paddle8