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July 23 2014

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2 posts tagged "Jean-Pierre Braganza"

On Your Marks: Carla Sozzani Sets The Pace For LFW

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“I look forward to seeing Christopher Kane, Roksanda Ilincic, and Mary Katrantzou’s shows,” 10 Corso Como’s Carla Sozzani (pictured, left) told Style.com last night at the exhibit Landing on Earth, curated by her partner and 10 CC’s creative director Kris Ruhs (pictured, right). “They always surprise me—those minds!”

It was Queens-born, Milan-based Ruhs’ first London exhibition, held in Wapping’s former Hydraulic Power Station. And despite being located in the innermost bowels of East London, Hussein Chalayan, Roksanda Ilincic, Peter Pilotto, Jean-Pierre Braganza, Boombox’s Richard Mortimer, Paolo Roversi, and Princess Julia still managed to find the venue, hidden in a dark cobblestone alleyway close to where Jack the Ripper did his work and where his spooky vibe hangs thick in the air. With the station’s soaring vaulted ceilings, gigantic boilers, wood beams and brick walls, and creepy atmosphere, Sozzani was busy taking pictures all night: “Look at that, how fantastic,” she said, snapping away as giggling partygoers lay down on Ruhs’ rotating table, their faces reflected in the Raku ceramic tree chandelier hanging above. Sozzani also trained her lens on Ruhs’ maze, which resembled a car wash (created entirely out of rubber from old tires rescued from Morocco and splashed in red paint), as well as a 30-foot metal curtain fashioned into a lattice effect. When suggested she should blog about it, Sozzani laughed: “Do you think the world needs another blogger? I am so absorbed with 10 Corso Como anyway!”

10 CC’s shop, restaurant, bookstore, gallery, and hotel rooms mean the couple is busy enough (especially Sozzani, who just arrived from the New York shows), and explains why Ruhs had been down to the eleventh hour in creation mode. “I was up painting this last night,” he said, referring to the Moroccan mosaic-motif painting. “Yes, we are busy, but the sense of liberation when it’s all done is exhilarating.” Speaking of busy, we asked Hussein Chalayan what else he will attend during LFW: “Are you kidding? I am just here for Carla and Kris! I show my collection in Paris in a couple weeks so it’s all nonstop,” he said, as other guests slowly made their way over to event number two—the Dover Street Arts Club for Stevie Wonder’s surprise gig. “I will be exhausted if I attend everything—I have to pace myself,” he said. For fashion week-goers, wiser words never spoken.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

London’s Young Guns Get The Beyoncé Boost

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In the hierarchy of London fashion, there’s a whole stratum of designers who’ve been thrust up the totem pole recently by the competitive dressing stakes of the music world. Lady Gaga, Rihanna, and Beyoncé, God bless them, have set the pace in ever more extreme image production, and London’s become a happy hunting ground for stylists who want their women to appear unique—and to be the first with a new name.

David Koma, a designer from the Republic of Georgia, fresh out of Saint Martins last year, had Beyoncé and Cheryl Cole (Britain’s biggest tabloid darling as an X Factor—think American Idol—panelist and frock duelist with Dannii Minogue) fighting over a dress. Hannah Marshall, Jean-Pierre Braganza, and Felder Felder, who showed together on London fashion week’s opening day, are in the same sort of zone—in their case, underground, goth-y gone mainstream. It’s certainly broadening out the visibility of young London—even if fashion purists tend to look askance at too much celeb involvement. The litmus test, when it comes down to it, is who can produce something of more substance and quality than stuff that just looks good on stage or video, and fits the general trend. At this round, Koma’s zigzag geometrics in caramel leather and black wool (pictured) looked exceptionally made, and Jean-Pierre Braganza did well to break away from the short and tight into long and printed. Otherwise, someone please tell them the giant box shoulder is O-V-E-R.

Photo: Courtesy of David Koma