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September 2 2014

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66 posts tagged "Jeremy Scott"

Adidas x Raf Simons Returns for Spring

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Adidas x Raf SimonsNot to be outdone by the Nike + R.T. Air Force 1 Riccardo Tisci collab, Adidas is unleashing another round of Raf Simons kicks for spring.

Building on the initial Fall 2013 collection that included just three styles of performance runners, this drop includes a whole slew of new unisex models—eight to be exact, each in up to four different colorways. Blending classic three-stripe silhouettes like on the Stan Smith with new tech and exaggerated shapes, bright colors and flashy patterns, the lineup looks like a footwear collection designed for a gang of very fashionable superheroes.

The brand is establishing itself as the go-to for designers looking to experiment with sneakers, and Simons is in good company at Adidas, where Rick Owens, Jeremy Scott, and Mark McNairy also have ongoing collections. Based on what we saw during fashion season—both Chanel and Dior had trainers on their couture runways—the trend will only continue to gain momentum.

Adidas x Raf Simons prices range from $440 to $570. The collection arrives soon at Adidas Originals concept stores, boutiques, and retailers carrying RAF.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Viva Moschino! The Chance to Buy a Piece of Fashion History

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Moschino at Decades

Hot on the heels of Jeremy Scott’s schismatic Moschino debut, the house is poised to clock some more time in the spotlight. L.A. vintage vanguard Decades recently snapped up more than two hundred iconic pieces from the private collection of Lynda Yost, a longtime devotee of the brand, all of which are up for grabs as of this morning. An exclusive first look at the offering debuts here. Decades co-owner Cameron Silver scored with Yost’s cache, which is exhaustive enough to turn many a museum curator emerald with envy. In fact, he dubs it, “The definitive Moschino collection on the planet.”

Long before Alexander Wang’s parental advisories, there were Franco Moschino’s designs, brimming over with logos and slogans, from the cheeky (“Better a happy hippie than a yukky yuppie”) to the more earnest (“Opposites must coexist!”). Yost, who was raised Amish, was first drawn to the fabled label thanks to a simple principle: Opposites attract. Moschino’s designs, equal parts kitsch and wit, were appealingly alien. Her first Moschino purchase? An appropriately exuberant pair of color-blocked harem pants. She’s also quick to note a curious 21st-century echo of that initial attraction. “I was interested in Jeremy Scott’s appointment because he’s also a farm boy, and there has just got to be something about the humor and the subtle tweaking of society that you’re not allowed to do when you’re a hardworking farm person.”

Moschnio at Decades

Yost and Silver are optimistic when it comes to Scott taking the reins, and about his potential when it comes to expanding the brand’s audience. “He is [appealing to] the right demographic, which is very young—younger than the old Moschino [catered to],” Yost says. “Moschino in his day would have made fun of Romeo Gigli and Chanel, and you had to be a fashionista to understand the humor. But with Jeremy making fun of McDonald’s, he’s speaking to a broader brushstroke audience and a younger one.” It’s a far cry from the industry’s lately more staid leanings (“normcore,” if you like). “I think we’ve lived in a long period of time where fashion has morphed away from fun and humorous, and Moschino always injected the frivolity into fashion,” Silver offers. It’s a noble mission, to bring the fun back to fashion, and both Yost and Silver are doing their part to make it as attainable as possible. As she puts it, “We’re very keen on the Moschino dictate, which is everybody should be fashionable. It isn’t just for the wealthy.” Items on offer range in price from a $25 pair of socks to a loftier $10,000 jacket. While Decades’ initial release is hardly scant, the duo hint that there may be more to come down the line. As Silver tells it, “Lynda has enough to dress an army!”

Photos: Courtesy Photos 

A Sign of the Times: Vanessa Friedman on the State of Fashion Criticism and Her New Gig

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Vanessa FriedmanChange is a’comin’. In the last six months, The New York Times’ key fashion critics and journalists—Eric Wilson, Cathy Horyn, and, most recently, Suzy Menkes—have departed the publication. (Wilson decamped to InStyle, Menkes is headed to International Vogue, and Horyn left for personal reasons.) But that’s not to say that the paper—which, thanks to Wilson’s wit, Horyn’s rapier pen, and Menkes’ learned insights, has offered up some of the most entertaining and informed fashion reporting of the last two decades—is losing its clout. Yesterday, the Times confirmed industry suspicions when it appointed Vanessa Friedman, formerly of the Financial Times, as its chief fashion critic and fashion director. Like her NYT predecessors, Friedman, who became the FT‘s first fashion editor in 2002, has a knack for not only critiquing fashion, but for helping us to understand it in a broader historical and cultural context. All one needs to do is read her recent takedown of Jeremy Scott’s first Moschino outing—which opened with the line, “Kiev was burning and in Milan, Jeremy Scott made his debut at Moschino with a series of bad jokes”—to understand what I’m talking about.

Friedman insists, however, that she is her own journalist—not Cathy Horyn, not Suzy Menkes—and when she dives into her new post next month, she plans to stick to her guns and honor her own voice, rather than focus on living up to the reputations of those who came before her. Here, Friedman speaks to Style.com about her new gig; the state of fashion criticism; and why, despite all the Internet’s white noise, readers still crave an expert opinion.

You were just hired for one of fashion journalism’s most prestigious positions. But why, in this day and age, is fashion criticism so important?
I think any kind of criticism is important, whether it’s fashion or another form of cultural analysis. And I think it always has been. There is a lot of talk about the rise of the blogger and social media and how everyone’s ability to become a critic has made formal critics less important. But I think what everyone is finding is that there is room for all sorts of opinions, some of them educated and some of them just literal. And I think the Times is an incredible platform to bring an educated, contextual, impersonal, analytical, historical, multicultural analysis to a forum, whether that’s books or music or movies or fashion.

Some say fashion critics aren’t always treated with the same respect as other reporters. Have you found that to be the case? Does fashion criticism deserve the same amount of respect as other forms of reporting?
Honestly, I haven’t found that to be the case. You know, I currently work at a highly financial-oriented newspaper, and I feel as legitimate and respected here as anybody. I think that if you treat your subject with seriousness and respect, other people tend to treat it the same way. The Times has a history of treating it that way, and I think that’s terrific. What’s interesting about fashion at the moment is that it has become a pervasive element in the general pop cultural conversation because of social media and the rise of visuals as a primary communication device. The first thing everyone talks about, whether they’re talking about film or music or presidents, is what they’re wearing. And that makes fashion a really interesting subject to look at, and one that’s relevant in a very broad context.

Given the power of advertisers these days, do you think it’s possible to be an unfettered critic? Do you feel you’re able to say what you want to say?
I’ve never, ever had an issue with this. It’s never crossed my mind and it’s never been something that’s been brought up to me. My feeling is that if you are a critic, what’s important is to be fair, and people respect that. They may not like it, but they are fine with it. And if you’re not willing to say when something is bad or a mistake, then when you say it’s good it means nothing.

What is your vision for the Times? Are you planning on changing anything?
I think it’s too early to say. I’m really excited to get to the newspaper—which isn’t going to happen for a couple of weeks—and meet everyone. Clearly, I’m a different person, a different writer than Cathy or Suzie or anyone else, so whatever I bring to the table is a specific point of view. But I think I’ll see when I get there.

In that same vein, how do you see yourself fitting into the team and the history of the New York Times in respect to Cathy? She had a reputation for being a spectacular—but often ruthless—critic. Do you aim to be the same?
No. I aim to be me. I would never aim to be the same as Cathy. She was terrific, and I have enormous respect for her and read everything she wrote. I loved sitting next to her at shows, I loved talking to her about lots of things—fashion and beyond. But we’re different people and we’re different writers. What I do will be different.

Your Moschino review was pretty sharp-tongued. What kind of response did you get to that piece?
Some people liked it, people agreed or disagreed. It was mostly via Twitter. I think Jeremy [Scott] tweeted his Facebook likes. But no one said anything, no one called me from Moschino and said, “How could you do that?” There was a reason I said what I said, it wasn’t just gratuitous, and hopefully I expressed that. I really look forward to seeing what he does next. Continue Reading “A Sign of the Times: Vanessa Friedman on the State of Fashion Criticism and Her New Gig” »

Rossella Jardini Joins the Missoni Family

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jardiniMoschino seems to be in the headlines more and more often these days. Following Jeremy Scott’s riotous debut collection in Milan last week (would you like fries with that?), WWD reports that the house’s former creative director Rossella Jardini has been tapped by Missoni. Jardini joins her friend Angela Missoni and will be acting as a “consultant” to the Italian house. “She is an experienced and extraordinary designer, expert in merchandising, photography, style, fabrics, and shapes,” Missoni said. She added that Jardini is “like family. I’ve known her for so long.” This will certainly be a dynamic duo to watch when the Spring shows come around.

Photo: IndigitalImages

Insta-Gratification: #MFW Edition

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. For this very special edition of Insta-Gratification, she’ll be calling out the best shots from #MFW. See below for today’s picks.

Monday, February 24

Giorgio and his Armani army.

Collect them all.

Marni, through Linda Fargo’s lens.

Missoni’s pre-show clique.

The finale bow. Squared. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification: #MFW Edition” »