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July 25 2014

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26 posts tagged "Jessica Stam"

BCBG Max Azria Celebrates Twenty-Five

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BCBGThere are scores of major fashion anniversaries on the calendar in 2014. Among them are: Lanvin’s 125th year, four decades of Diane von Furstenberg’s iconic wrap dress, and the thirtieth birthday of Donna Karan’s namesake collection. Last but not least is BCBG Max Azria, which will be celebrating twenty-five years in business with its Fall ’14 show tomorrow morning. After Max Azria launched his contemporary label in 1989, BCBG (the acronym stands for “bon chic, bon genre,” a French phrase meaning “good style, good attitude”) quickly became known for its playful, feminine wares with a bohemian edge. Today, the brand boasts more than 570 boutiques worldwide. And in addition to having longtime celebrity fans, including Angelina Jolie, Alicia Keys, and Melissa George, it’s had a number of top-tier models stalk its runways over the years—Helena Christensen, Natalia Vodianova, Erin Wasson, Lara Stone, Daria Werbowy, Freja Beha Erichsen, and Jessica Stam, for starters.

“I can’t believe it’s been twenty-five years,” BCBG’s chief creative officer, Lubov Azria (Max’s wife), told Style.com. “Each morning, I still wake up and ask myself, How do I make it better? We are in the business of inspiring people to do what inspires them,” she added. To commemorate BCBG’s anniversary, Lubov spoke to Style.com about some of the brand’s most memorable moments from the past quarter century. Click for a slideshow of her top picks.

Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos Talk Target

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Jourdan Dunn

London-based label Peter Pilotto, made up of Pilotto and best friend Christopher De Vos, is known for its kaleidoscopic, futuristic, printed looks. The pair’s work is intensely intricate and, quite often, computer engineered. On February 9, they’ll follow in the footsteps of designers like Phillip Lim and Prabal Gurung when they bring their neon-hued, digi-printed womenswear to the masses via a hotly anticipated collaboration with Target. The beachy seventy-piece capsule comprises trapezoidal-cut swimwear; some very boardwalk-to-street Vans-style trainers; lots of feminine, floral-layered hoop skirts; and some rash-guard-inspired separates. The range, which is priced between $14.99 and $79.99, will be the first of Target’s designer collaborations to be sold on Net-a-Porter—a testament to the quality of the work. Also a testament to the collection? Its campaign cast—not just anybody can get Jessica Stam and Jourdan Dunn to strike a pose. The latter’s ad (above), as well as a behind-the-scenes video (below), debut exclusively here.

We sat down with Pilotto and De Vos to discuss the origins of the Target project; how they translated their detailed, techy designs within the constraints of a mass price-point; and why, at the end of the day, it’s all about the color.

How did Target approach you?
Peter Pilotto: Somebody set up the meeting, and we were like, ‘Oh, that’s great.’ We always knew about Target, obviously. We didn’t have to think much. When they asked us if we really wanted to do it, we were like, “Yeah, sure!” And the whole process was extremely pleasant. They gave us the freedom to do what we liked.

Christopher De Vos: We’re excited that, with this collaboration, we can reach a whole new audience.

PP: And we hope to reach a big audience age-wise, too—from the 15-year-old girl to the 75-year-old woman.

What was the concept behind the collection? And did you find it difficult to translate your vision to fit within the Target price point?
PP: The swimwear was the starting point. We wanted something very signature to our brand but translated in a different way—something very energetic, joyful, summery, and vibrant. We liked the idea so much that you could have a swimwear look and a skirt, and you could build up your look from beach to street.

CDV: We made almost like a rash guard, and you can wear it with a swimsuit and take off your skirt and wear it to the beach. That was the whole idea. We also analyzed our color combinations and how we could translate those. Obviously, there were limitations because of price point, but I think those limitations pushed us to do new things. And while we had to rethink our usual fabrications, we feel it’s very us.

PP: And it was exciting to work in a different way within the systems that were right for Target. We couldn’t do the engineered print that we’re used to doing, so instead, we used seams and worked on layered versions of all of our prints. I guess the collaboration was the highest amount of prints they ever did. I think often, it’s especially stimulating when you have constraints.

The palette is very in tune with what you usually send down the runway.
CDV: I think if we weren’t based in London, we’d do everything in black. But because the weather’s so gray, we’re longing for something colorful.

There is so much color coming out of London, despite all the fog.
PP: It’s very inspiring. And East London, where all the designers are based, all the artists, everybody—it’s a really good spot because of the interesting, the mix of people.

CDV: We feel like we live in a village.

Can you tell us what you have planned for Fall ’14?
PP: I think with our Spring ’14 collection, we wanted to translate our signature ideas in new ways, so we did a lot of lace and embroidery. While we’re known for the print, there is actually so much more now that we’re busy with besides the print that we love to do. It’s all about the desire for color that we try to express in different ways. Last season, we worked with lace that was engineered like the print was in the past—there were color layouts that were made in the lace, layered with print underneath. We want to explore that further, and push those techniques for Fall.

When you’re conceptualizing a collection, where do you normally begin? With this Target collaboration, you were talking about the swimwear. But is it color? Is it silhouette?
CDV: It always starts with colors. Then it’s a constant dialogue. We work together. We make every decision together. And it’s a journey through the seasons.

Photo: Courtesy of Target

Jessica Stam Joins the LPD Dream Team

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LPD's Stam Shirt

What does Jessica Stam have in common with Karl Lagerfeld, Miuccia Prada, Riccardo Tisci, and Dries Van Noten? The model can now claim an LPD New York T-shirt boldly emblazoned with her last name and birth year (’86) in black. Last night, Stam and LPD founder Benjamin Fainlight hosted friends including Jennifer Fisher and Athena Calderone at The Jane hotel to celebrate the launch of the new “Team Stam” collaboration jersey that will benefit the catwalker’s charity of choice, Many Hopes, which invests in sustainable community development in Kenya. One hundred percent of the proceeds from each shirt will go to the foundation. “My friend connected me with Stam and thought there was potential to use LPD and her shared platform to give back to a really great cause,” Fainlight told Style.com.

Over the past year, LPD New York’s novelty tees have developed a cult following with the street-style set, and Fainlight recently expanded beyond designers’ names with the Artist Series, which includes Hirst, Pollock, and Warhol styles. Beginning with Team Stam, we think Fainlight is onto something with models—who wouldn’t want to advertise their allegiance to Team Campbell, Team Moss, or Team Smalls? The designer hinted, “Well, I can’t give away too much, but I might just have that same concept coming out with a prevalent online retailer [chances are it's Net-a-Porter] that has been amazing about supporting the brand and giving us a global stage.” Building off of this idea, Stam suggested, “It would be neat if other philanthropic models like Liya Kebede, Christy Turlington Burns for Every Mother Counts, and Karlie Kloss for FEED got involved in another round of shirts.”

A potential model series isn’t the only project in the pipeline for LPD. On Friday evening, the label will stage its first NYFW concept presentation in conjunction with Conflict of Interest (known for its witty fashion T-shirts splashed with puns like “Ballinciaga” or “Ill Slander”). At the Spring ’14 show, Fainlight will debut a full cut-and-sewn collection including tailored outerwear, knitwear, and trousers that reportedly focuses on unorthodox finishings and treatments. “I really wanted to play with the conventions of streetwear and incorporate high-fashion concepts,” Fainlight said. “I think this new direction will show people that we’re a lot more than a T-shirt brand.”

Photo: Courtesy of LPD NYC

Photo: Courtesy of LPD NYC

Dean and Dan Caten: Crank Yankers²

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Dsquared²‘s Dean and Dan Caten have taken a cinematic approach to showcasing their collections of late (who could forget last season, when the pair dressed up in drag for their Spring ’13 film?). In order to tell the story behind their Pre-Fall ’13 range, the brothers have expanded upon their Resort video, in which Cara Delevingne—dressed in the house’s glam-gone-grunge wares—screams into a gritty pay phone. Lensed by Senio Zapruder, the new short (above) stars Jasmine Tookes, who prank calls Delevingne while wearing Dsquared²’s decadent vintage Hollywood looks. “[Resort and Pre-Fall] are two very different types of collections—Jasmine is all thirties, and Cara is nineties sexy—but it was an interesting way to connect them,” offered Dan, noting that previous Dsquared² girls, including Lindsey Wixson and Jessica Stam, make cameos as x-ed-out images in Jasmine’s diary.

“We have fun and we don’t take ourselves too seriously; that’s what makes our job interesting,” said Dan when asked about he and Dean’s penchant for dramatics—apparent not only in their videos but also on the runway (Spring ’14 menswear, anyone?). “Sometimes we get bitched out about it, but if we had to be serious and political, and think too much, we would get bored. So whatever; we’re not boring like that yet, and when I am, I will probably stop doing what I do,” he added.

The designers feel it’s important to work with young talent on their creative projects—director Zapruder is a student, and Stefano Riva, who wrote the music for the short, is only 17. “Young people have a lot of fresh ideas and energy. And they know stuff! I’m almost 50, I don’t go out as much as I should, and kids keep you attached to the world,” said Dan.

The brand’s next project will be a film for its new underwear line. “It’s going to be super, super hot,” said Dan. “Like hard-core hot. And we just did a baby collection…. I’m sure we could do a couple things for that royal baby.”

Modelizing Milan

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Milan is notoriously regarded as a difficult city for new models. But it’s not hard to see why big-name labels like Versace and Gucci prefer to cast established catwalkers like Joan Smalls, Karlie Kloss, and Karmen Pedaru: Veterans simply know how to carry sexy clothes. That said, many of the rookies we’ve had our eyes on since the beginning of the season have proven that they can strut toe-to-toe with the big girls. Chiharu Okunugi, Sam Rollinson, Sasha Luss, and Katya Riabinkina, in particular, seem to be at the top of most casting directors’ lists this season. We’re also going to add Manuela Frey, a Spring ’13 Saint Laurent exclusive who opened Calvin Klein in New York and did turns at Dolce & Gabbana, Bottega Veneta, and Emilio Pucci in Italy. She’s kept up the momentum so far in Paris, with appearances at Dries Van Noten, Rochas, and Damir Doma.

Perhaps the best way to evaluate Milan’s crop of newcomers is to compare two of the week’s most hyped shows: Prada, which is cast by Ashley Brokaw, and Jil Sander, which is cast by Maida & Rami. Both are characteristically chock-full of unknowns, but there was more of an overlap than usual this season. Girls who walked both include past Balenciaga exclusives Juliane Gruner and Kirstin Kragh Liljegren (who actually opened Balenciaga last season). At Prada, they were sandwiched in between well-known faces such as Mariacarla Boscono, Liisa Winkler, Adriana Lima, Kirsten Owen, Jessica Stam, Iselin Steiro, and Esther de Jong (easily one of our favorite casts thus far), as well as a few more novices like Maartje Verhoef (above, left), Elise Smidt, and Jessa Brown, who also did Sander. As we move into the Paris shows, we’ll have our eyes peeled for these girls and a few others, including Amanda Murphy (above, right), who bookended Prada after opening Proenza Schouler, and then followed that up with appearances at Dries Van Noten and H&M today.

Speaking of, H&M turned out a cast of heavy hitters (you can chalk that up to a mega-budget and George Cortina’s styling), including Arizona Muse, Cara Delevingne, Daphne Groeneveld, Delfine Bafort, Edita Vilkeviciute, Isabeli Fontana, Joan Smalls, and closer Malgosia Bela.