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April 17 2014

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85 posts tagged "Jil Sander"

Is It Time To Celebrate, Not Lament, Fashion’s Revolving Door?

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How much does it matter who's behind the Margiela mask?The rumor mill is churning again today, with a choice bit of unconfirmed gossip: Wags are wondering if London designer Marios Schwab isn’t lending a hand to the famously anonymous Maison Martin Margiela. Margiela himself exited the company in 2009, and ever since there have been rumors and reports of other designers—most recently former Céline hand Ivana Omazic—guiding the design team. The Margiela team’s only comment was that it does not communicate on who its designers are, and, in the words of WWD, “characterizing its studio as a creative collective with members of long standing that it feeds regularly with new contributors.”

While the impetus to unmask single design geniuses is an understandable one, it may be a model that’s falling out of date. It begs the question: Should we always have one designer to point to, or is a more team-spirited approach the better way? Certainly Margiela has been on an upswing these last few seasons.

The Maison is not alone in adopting, happily, a revolving door mentality. When Christopher Kane left Versus, Donatella Versace opted not to hire a single designer in his place, but to invite a series of guests to try their hands. (First up, J.W. Anderson; second, M.I.A.) And in a recent editorial on the fate of Jil Sander after the departure (again) of Jil Sander, Cathy Horyn wondered aloud if the best practice wouldn’t be to build a strong design team. It’s not hard to imagine that being refreshed with new talent as talent arrives.

Something to think about, as several large houses—from Louis Vuitton to Sander—go, for the moment, without single stewards.

Photo: Gianni Pucci / InDigital | GoRunway

Jil Sander Exits Jil Sander

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Jil SanderFollowing her third comeback last year, designer Jil Sander is leaving her namesake brand. Her final collection for the house (which was helmed by Raf Simons from 2005 through 2012) was for Spring ’14. The Jil Sander Group announced today that the Fall ’14 collection will be designed by an in-house team. No word yet on Sander’s successor.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos/ Indigitalimages.com

Milan’s Major Modeling Moments

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Clockwise from top left: Natalia Siodmiak, Binx Walton, Irina Liss, and Nastya Sten

More so than in any other city, Milan designers and casting directors are known to favor established models over newcomers, but this week we witnessed a slew of fresh faces break through to the front of the pack. Many of the girls who started strong in New York and London (specifically, Malaika Firth, Anna Ewers, Kate Goodling, and Ophelie Guillermand) kept the pace up in Italy. Then Miuccia Prada and casting director Ashley Brokaw introduced us to a whole new set of noteworthy rookies, including Nastya Sten (bottom left), Irina Liss (bottom right), and Paulina King. Flaxen-haired Sten debuted as an exclusive at Proenza Schouler (another Brokaw-cast show), scored a semi-exclusive spot at Prada, and went on to walk Jil Sander, Bottega Veneta, Roberto Cavalli, and open Aquilano.Rimondi. Meanwhile, we’ve fallen head over heels for Liss’ tight-lipped look. The otherworldly Russian followed up her Prada premiere with turns at Jil Sander, Dolce & Gabbana, and Missoni. Finally, King made a splash at Prada, Marni (she bookended the show), and Jil Sander.

Another thing Milan was previously known for was overlooking minorities, so it was thrilling to see many of our favorite up-and-coming black models, including Firth, Binx Walton (top right), Cindy Bruna, Maria Borges (we never could’ve guessed that she would open Giorgio Armani), and Kai Newman making major strides this week. Newman, who hails from Kingston, Jamaica, positively wowed us at Gucci and Jil Sander. We can’t wait to see her go on to crush it in Paris.

Natalia Siodmiak (top left) is someone who has been making the rounds for several seasons but is suddenly at the top of everyone’s watch lists. After ending London on a high note with turns at Christopher Kane and Giles, the gap-toothed beauty cranked up the sex appeal at Gucci, Versace, and Emilio Pucci, and opened and closed Max Mara. It’s gratifying to see someone who’s been paying her dues finally have a moment. Speaking of moments, who could forget Moschino’s memorable roster of old-school supes, including Pat Cleveland, Alek Wek, Erin O’Connor, Jodie Kidd, and Diana Dondoe? Another runway high point was Liya Kebede and Malgosia Bela walking Emilio Pucci. And, naturally, there’s plenty in store for model-followers in Paris. Just today, iconic Snejana Onopka made a cameo appearance at Anthony Vaccarello, whipping the Fashion Spot forums into a frenzy.

Photos: IndigitalImages

Body By Dior

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A still from I Am Love

Luca Guadagnino—who became fashion’s favorite filmmaker after featuring Jil Sander by Raf Simons wares in his 2009 flick, I am Love (above)—has tapped Dior to costume his new movie, Body Art. Does that make Raf the body artist?

Photo: Magnolia Pictures / Courtesy Neal Peters Collection

Quick to the Draw: A Moment With Richard Haines

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Richard HainesRichard Haines is somewhat of a fashion-week anomaly—he’s a 61-year-old illustrator with a blog. In a past life, he was a womenswear designer for some of America’s biggest brands, such as Calvin Klein, Bill Blass, Perry Ellis, and Puff Daddy, but he threw all that in to focus on art in the digital age. He quickly gained traction, getting hired by everyone from J.Crew to The New York Times for his ability to make guys look far cooler on paper than they do in real life (you can only imagine what he does for models at runway shows). And recently, he received the ultimate validation: a gig illustrating Prada’s menswear collections, the fruits of which were released in book and T-shirt form. Haines gave us a sneak peek at his Spring ’14 illustrations from Prada (below, left), Jil Sander (below, right), and Andrea Incontri (bottom), which debut exclusively here. And below, the talent talks about flying on private jets with Calvin Klein, life as a blogger, and that one time three days ago when Beppe Modenese mistook him for Bill Cunningham.

When did you first come to the shows and what’s changed since then?
Eighteen thirty-four [laughs]. I went to Paris fashion week in the early eighties, when I was designing, and a friend of mine, who was the editor of New York magazine, would take me to shows like Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler. It was this amazing moment in Paris. Back then I saw womenswear, now I see menswear, so the scale of the audience is different. The biggest thing [then] was this trend of sending out, like, eight models in the same outfit all at once. It was very dramatic, and that doesn’t seem to happen now. If anything, it’s gotten more intimate and more manageable. But the media has made fashion week very different, which is fascinating.

I’ve heard you say that people were dropping a lot more money back in those days.
Yeah, it was a different time. It was easier to be in the fashion business, because there weren’t these constant collections to do. The stakes weren’t as high, and people did it with a lot more money. Now, there are more brands competing for less money. A couple of years after I started going to the collections in Paris, I was working at Calvin Klein, and it was a privately owned company—it was his company—so if he wanted to charter a jet, he would. We’d go to London and then the fabric shows in Milan, and then we’d go to Lake Como and stay at the Villa d’Este. It wasn’t bad.

Richard Haines' sketches from Prada and Jil Sander

What’s it like being one of the only illustrators at the shows?
I love doing it. There’s something really exciting about sitting down and watching someone present and being able to draw it. I don’t think about whether I’m one of the only people doing this. I just love doing it, and it makes me happy. I just keep going.

What are your fashion-week essentials?
I inevitably always forget one thing. I have little cases where I carry charcoal pencils, Moleskine notebooks—which reminds me, I need to buy a new one today—a charger for my cell phone, antidepressants…. And that’s it. When I first started doing this, I would forget paper, and I started drawing on envelopes and show notes and people loved that, so sometimes it works to my advantage. Continue Reading “Quick to the Draw: A Moment With Richard Haines” »