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August 1 2014

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4 posts tagged "Joe Zee"

Today’s New York Offers Fewer Drugs, Bigger Dreams

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Karen Elson

Last night in the seventh-floor Living Room at its Times Square location, W Hotels partnered with cultural organization Liberatum to present a “Living New York” panel discussion. Yahoo’s Joe Zee moderated the intimate chat, which included the likes of Karen Elson, Prabal Gurung, architect Karim Rashid, and filmmaker Paul Haggis. The topic of the evening was the impact coming to New York had had on all of their lives.

Although Rashid had a cynical attitude—”New York has changed! There’s a Citibank and a Starbucks on every corner!”—Karen Elson’s comments proved that the model-turned-musician still has rosy eyes for the Big Apple. “Of course New York has changed,” said Elson. “It’s no longer the drug-addled punk days of Giuliani. But that’s what is so amazing. It’s reinventing constantly. In New York, you can be whoever you want to be. In New York, you can dream. That’s the thing for me.”

The conversation took an interesting turn when the digitization of our world—and the impact of none other than Style.com—came into the mix. Said Gurung of media’s effect on the creative class, “It’s a digital age, and I love it. I am so excited where things are going. I even love the narcissism of Instagram. But there’s a group of people who look at Style.com and say, ‘I want to do what everyone else is doing.’ Then there is someone like me who looks at Style.com and says, ‘I want to do something different.’”

Photo: Benjamin Lozovsky/BFAnyc.com 

The Daily‘s Night

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The Daily Front Row First Annual Fashion Media Awards sponsored by Samsung

Friday evening, underneath the massive crystal chandeliers and amid the rococo decor of the Upper East Side’s Harlow restaurant, fashion’s boldfaced names gathered to dole out The Daily Front Row‘s first annual Fashion Media Awards. The vibe was touchingly familiar, with Tim Gunn introducing TV Personality of the Year Heidi Klum (“I met Heidi nine years ago, and I was a trembling, nervous, sweating, sputtering battling wreck—and I sustained that same demeanor for many, many seasons of Project Runway,” he recalled), Marc Jacobs speaking for the Editor in Chief of the Year winner, Grazia UK‘s Jane Bruton (“She’s the perfect combination of smart, bubbly, and fun—and from what I hear, sometimes a little too much fun,” he joked), and Lady Gaga, in a frenetic finale, presenting Stephen Gan with his Fashion Magazine of the Year award.

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele introduced Model of the Year, Social Media, Karlie Kloss, and reminisced about their first shoot together with Steven Meisel, while Jessica Biel and Elle‘s Joe Zee (winner of the Creative Director of the Year) joked about their “first time” (i.e., first cover) together in 2007, and the discovery of Zee’s “sick hip-hop dance” moves in the years that followed. Later, Bruce Weber came to the stage to speak for longtime friend and Fashion Scoop of the Year winner Ingrid Sischy, who was recognized for her John Galliano feature in Vanity Fair. He was quick to emphasize the significance of the fact that—in the age of insta-everything—her story took two years to complete.

“I think it’s actually a great thing to do a Fashion Media Awards, because fashion media really are a part of the business of fashion—and really help in shaping and creating the image of fashion,” said Jay Manuel between texts to DVF (“Looking forward to that show!”). “The people who go behind the scenes typically need to have the spotlight shot on them, so people know who is behind the images.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Every Asian Parent’s Nightmare? Nah, It’s Just Fashion

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“This panel has become every Asian parent’s nightmare,” joked SuChin Pak. The MTV correspondent was at Columbia University yesterday to moderate a panel of Asian-Americans in—gaspthe fashion industry. But even if they haven’t chosen law or medicine, it’s hard to imagine the superstar panelists aren’t doing their folks proud. A diverse group including Phillip Lim, Opening Ceremony’s Humberto Leon and Carol Lim, Elle‘s Joe Zee, and stylists Tina Chai and Aya T. Kanai were all on hand to discuss their experiences in fashion. Not that they’d all started there. Carol Lim and Tina Chai had worked in investment banking and law, respectively, before switching fields. But all of the panelists stressed the important of following their passions, whether, like Chai, from law to a magazine job to freelance, or Zee, who’d never wanted to do anything but work for magazines. And while that often led them to sidestep a more traditional career (or the wishes of their parents), Phillip Lim clarified that there’s nothing so specifically Asian-American about that. “The future is really a global citizen,” he said following the panel. “It’s a shame we have to break it down and categorize it. Maybe those are the first steps in order to eventually having the ultimate goal of just one citizen.”

Photo: Sharon Shum/Courtesy of Hoot Magazine

A Bit Of Sunday Joie De Vivre

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Looking for Shala Monroque any given Sunday? Try Café Gitane, her go-to brunch spot. But it was at the Crosby Street Hotel where Monroque (pictured, right), along with Bonnie Morrison (pictured, left), stylists Lisa Tobias and Julie Ragolia, and a mix of fashion girls, stopped for a bite (and a mimosa) to celebrate their new appointments as Joie’s “Sunday Girls.” The contemporary label tapped the ladies—along with Elettra Wiedemann, Harley Viera-Newton, and Pamela Love—to offer their secret spots and favorite haunts for the label’s new City Guides, which will accompany its Fall 2010 lookbook. And the brunch dress code? As you’d expect, this isn’t a slumming-in-sweats crew, though the talk did turn toward the athletic; hitting the gym seems to be a preferred Sunday pastime. “Joe Zee took me to a hip-hop class and I had to leave within the first 15 minutes,” Morrison confessed with a laugh. “Everybody knew the steps and had their special moves or whatever, and of course Joe goes every week, and then there was me.” Monroque empathized. “I went to a ballet class the other day and I’m not going back. In New York, you have ex-professional dancers next to you in class!” Word to the wise, New Yorkers. But they won’t be the only ones to benefit from the wisdom of the City Girls; Joie will eventually select ambassadors in L.A., London, and Paris to share their trade secrets, and will donate $1,500 to each girl’s charity of choice.

Photos: Courtesy of Joie