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September 1 2014

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67 posts tagged "Joseph Altuzarra"

“RuPaul Is Kind of the Ultimate Supermodel,” and More Musings From Parsons Honoree Jason Wu

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Jason Wu

With his Hugo Boss debut and thriving eponymous line, Jason Wu is having a banner year. So it comes as little surprise that the 31-year-old Taiwanese-Canadian designer is picking up the top honor at Parsons’ 2014 Fashion Benefit, which is set for tomorrow evening. Ahead of the festivities, Wu, who’s both a Parsons alum and—fun fact—a former toy designer, took time away from wrapping his forthcoming Resort collection to speak with Style.com about his secrets to success, New York fashion’s changing landscape, and his obsession with RuPaul.

Congratulations on the Parsons honor. Considering you studied at the school, do you feel you’ve come full circle?
I’ve kind of come full circle because I moved here in 2001 for my first year at Parsons. So it’s nice to go back and be a part of this new generation of the school, which has taught me a lot and done so much for me. It’s a very nice honor and I’m very proud. But I don’t think I’ve made it—at all. I think I’ve hit a nice moment in my career and it feels great to have your peers and people in your industry acknowledge your work. But that’s not to say that there’s not much more work to do.

Between your debut at Hugo Boss, the success of your own line, and now this award, it seems that you’ve really hit your stride this year.
I don’t know. I always think there’s more to do, so I never think I’ve hit my stride. I always want more and want to do more, but certainly I think it’s been a great year so far, having done two shows in New York for the first time, and then getting this award. I guess that comes with age and experience and just doing it for a while. And I guess I’m getting a little better at it.

Do people look at you differently now that you’ve become the big man at Boss?
I don’t know if I’ve knocked it out of the park yet, but I think we had a really successful first show and I guess people look at me a little more like a grown-up, a big person.

Do you feel like a grown-up?
Yeah, I feel a little older. I guess that means grown-up. Definitely achier.

Jason Wu

Your Boss show was quite the star-studded event, and Jennifer Lawrence just wore a gown from your Fall collection to the world premiere of X-Men: Days of Future Past. What role does celebrity dressing play in a designer’s success?
Having people you admire wear your clothes in a very public way is inspiring, and it’s also a great way to get your work out there. It’s a great form of advertising. But for me it’s always about quality, not quantity, and it’s about dressing the few girls that I love. I’ve always been very loyal to Diane Kruger, Reese Witherspoon, Rachel Weisz, Michelle Williams, Kerry Washington—those are girls I dress over and over and over again. And you really develop a rapport and a friendship and a relationship. It goes back to the days when Givenchy and Audrey Hepburn, and Catherine Deneuve and Yves Saint Laurent, had those relationships that went [beyond commerciality]. Those were true relationships. It’s great to continue that tradition.

Can a young designer make it these days without a celebrity bump?
Everyone does it differently. There are some people who make clothes that are more appropriate for a red carpet and there are some people who don’t. I’m not sure if it’s a do-or-die situation, but you do have to seek exposure in your own way, in a way that’s right for your brand.

Jennifer LawrenceHow did you come to dress Jennifer Lawrence for her X-Men premiere? Was that a big moment for you?

Yeah. Actually, we just found out [the day before]. I had no idea. I think there’s something so incredibly human about her. That’s why people love her so much—she’s so relatable. She shows a little imperfection—which we all have—and still looks stunning.

You mentioned that people like seeing imperfection in public figures. With that in mind, people seem to like you a lot. What’s your imperfection?

My imperfection is that I’m not as perfect as people seem to think I am. There’s a sense of controlled, sophisticated ideas in my clothes that are quite neat, and I think people sometimes think I’m that, but I’m not.

Are you messy?
I’m actually not messy. I’m terrible at waking up early. I’m terrible at a lot of things. I’m terrible at technology—anything computer-oriented. And I’m terrible at making anything on time, which I’m really working on. Actually, at Parsons, I was always really late, and you can’t be late at Parsons. You really get into trouble.

You, along with Alexander Wang, Prabal Gurung, Joseph Altuzarra, etc., are part of New York’s new guard. How do you think the creative climate here is changing?
Right now, New York fashion week is at its best. We have the most young talent [succeeding] at the same time for the first time in a long, long while, and this is the first time that we’ve really been acknowledged on an international level in a long time. That has to do with the fact that our generation’s outlook is global, rather than local. If you look at Style.com, you can read that anywhere in the world. That certainly helps. Having that kind of recognition all over the world is something that is quite rare. We’re experiencing something of a moment, a movement.

Why is that, do you think?
It is, in so many ways, New York’s time. All [of the young designers] in New York come from different international backgrounds. I think that’s a very nice representation of what New York fashion is about—it’s about diversity; it’s about fresh ideas; it’s about making its own statement, because we don’t have the hundreds of years of history. We’re really still, as a whole, quite new at it.

Jason Wu Fall 14

Do you remember how you felt when you were designing your Parsons graduate collection?
It’s so funny because I went to Parsons and my major was menswear, yet I make the most fit-and-flare dresses you could possibly imagine. I guess after going to the very masculine side, I felt like I was much more comfortable in the very feminine side, and eventually the combination of the two became my work as we know it today.

Why were you initially drawn to menswear?
I always liked the idea of tailoring. I always felt making a jacket was the most difficult thing, and it is still the most difficult. Sometimes the cleanest things with the least amount of details are the most intricate.

What do fashion students need to know that isn’t necessarily taught in school?
It’s that the fashion industry isn’t by-the-books. It’s not about following one specific route, it’s about paving your own way and making it your own. That’s what makes fashion interesting—individual visions—and not one person breaks through in the same way. We all get into it slightly differently—I worked in toys first.

Speaking of toys, I read that back in the day, you did a RuPaul doll?
I worked with RuPaul once! It was a long time ago. We made a RuPaul doll and it was wildly successful and that’s how I met him. Of course, RuPaul’s Drag Race is my favorite show ever. It’s like the best show on television. RuPaul is kind of the ultimate supermodel, and I have an obsession with supermodels.

Jason Wu RuPaul

Does your former life as a toy designer ever inform your fashion designs?
Attention to detail is what links my work as a toy designer and a fashion designer. Most people say I went from dressing toy dolls to real dolls. That’s kind of the press-y version of it. But in actuality, I did everything from designing the sculptural form of the dolls to the industrialization of the molds to the manufacturing. I always knew how to create a really good product, and I think that experience primed me for this industry.

How important has business savvy been to your success?
The balance between creativity and business-savvy is something that every young designer needs to be aware of, because it’s the reality of our industry. Having that balance is something that my generation of New York designers really thinks about.

What is your advice to fashion students who want to be the next Jason Wu?
I don’t know if they do want to be the next Jason Wu! But my advice is seize every opportunity and work hard. It sounds so obvious to say that, but the glamour of the industry can get distracting sometimes, and at the end of the day it’s about the work. I work weekends all the time—there’s no such thing as overtime for me because my own time is overtime. And I don’t have any vacations, so cancel those family plans.

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com; Leandro Justen/BFANYC.com; FilmMagic; Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com; Getty Images

Taking a Chance on Pants: What We Want to See A-Listers Wearing in Cannes

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Now TrendingBetween last Monday’s Met ball, Spring gala season, and the 67th annual Cannes Film Festival (which officially kicked off yesterday), eveningwear has been at the top of our minds lately. But with all due respect to Charles James and the starlets who aimed to honor his legacy by donning Gone With the Wind-style gowns at the Costume Institute extravaganza, we’ve definitely had our fill of dramatic ball skirts. If there’s one thing we’d like to see more of on the Croisette this year, it’s actresses wearing pants. In our opinion, the coolest girls at red-carpet events are the ones rocking stovepipe trousers with tiny tops or sleek le smokings. Take, as examples, Cara Delevingne’s relatively casual Stella McCartney look at the Met or the crisp white Saint Laurent suit that Gia Coppola wore to her Palo Alto premiere. Standing next to one of them in a poufy dress would make almost anyone feel fussy by comparison.

Designers seem to be championing new eveningwear alternatives, too. Raf Simons’ recent Cruise show for Dior opened with a number of dressy pant looks. And we can’t get enough of the snazzy top-and-trouser combos spotted in the Fall ’14 collections of Joseph Altuzarra, Narciso Rodriguez, and newcomers like Rosie Assoulin, Maki Oh, and Isa Arfen. Considering these convincing options, we’re hoping celebrity stylists decide to take a chance on pants.

Here, a slideshow of red-carpet-ready trousers and suits.

Lupita Nyong’o Is Headed to the CFDAs

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Lupita Nyong'oThe CFDA Fashion Awards just got a little more star power. It was announced today that Lupita Nyong’o will be on hand to present the prestigious Womenswear Designer of the Year Award to Alexander Wang, Joseph Altuzarra, or Marc Jacobs. After landing a Miu Miu ad campaign, being named People‘s Most Beautiful Person, and generally just dazzling the entire world with her elegance and charm, we wouldn’t be surprised if Nyong’o snagged a CFDA Fashion Icon Award by 2015 (the same award Rihanna will pick up this year). Next on our mind: What will she wear to the June 2 awards?

Photo: Getty Images 

Shop the Look: Blush Tones

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STL blush

One of our favorite trends for Fall ’14 is unexpected, clashing colors. Take Miuccia Prada, for instance, who convinced us to rethink primary hues, and Joseph Altuzarra, who expertly paired fuchsia with army green. Narciso Rodriguez employed pops of sunset orange, and at Emilio Pucci, Peter Dundas took a risk with canary yellow. We’ll definitely incorporate some of those brights into our cold-weather wardrobes, but why not jump on the trend now? For spring, we suggest trying one of Raf Simons’ winning combos at Dior: cotton-candy pink and fire-engine red. Traditionally reserved for Valentine’s Day, varying shades of pink and red (from ultra-pale to neon) look fresh, modern, and delightfully out of the ordinary. Shop our favorite blush-hued pieces from Stella McCartney, Topshop, Carven, and more, below.

1. Topshop knitted rib textured jumper, $76, available at topshop.com

2. Wildfox Kitten 56-mm sunglasses, $179, available at nordstrom.com

3. Stella McCartney Jodie floral-jacquard miniskirt, $628, available at mytheresa.com

4. Frasier Sterling distressed wood bracelets with multicolor tassels, $80 for three, available at frasiersterling.com

5. Carven coral suede ankle strap bow pumps, $590, available at ssense.com

Photo: Courtesy Photo

The International Woolmark Prize Announces U.S. Finalists, Introduces Menswear Category

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International Woolmark Prize - Milan Fashion Week Womenswear Autumn/Winter 2014

Things are changing for this year’s International Woolmark Prize competition. For the first time ever, two designers will be receiving the overall award—one for menswear, one for womenswear—and we’re already placing our bets on the USA nominees, which were announced today. Jonathan Simkhai, M.Patmos, Nonoo, Rosie Assoulin, and Whit will duke it out for womenswear, while A.A. Antonio Azzuolo, Mark McNairy New Amsterdam, Ovadia & Sons, Public School, Timo Weiland, and Todd Snyder will compete for the menswear title. “The addition of a menswear award this year signifies the strength and following of the International Woolmark Prize and its impact over the past two years across the globe,” said Stuart McCullough, The Woolmark Company managing director. “Previous winners Christian Wijnants from Belgium and Rahul Mishra from India have both experienced exponential increase in the turnover of their businesses, becoming international names overnight after their respective wins in London in 2013 and Milan in 2014.”

Regional competitions are also taking place in Asia, Europe, Australia, and India/Middle East to select ten finalists, who will each receive AU $50,000 ($47,000 USD) toward their next collection, as well as an invitation to the international final. (As you may recall, Joseph Altuzarra represented the USA last year.) The two overall winners will receive AU $100,000 ($94,000 USD) to go toward the fabric sourcing and marketing of their collections, and will also have the opportunity to sell their collection at Harvey Nichols, Colette, Saks Fifth Avenue, and other key retailers around the world.

Photo: Getty Images