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April 21 2014

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14 posts tagged "Joseph"

Joseph Fetes Twenty-Five

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Joseph Capsule

Twenty-five years after the opening of its flagship on London’s Fulham Road, Joseph is finally staging its first runway presentation on London Fashion Week’s official schedule. Next week’s presentation just one component of the quarter-century birthday celebration—another crucial part is the launch of a capsule collection that fetes all things Joseph. With contributions from six designers, the range will be available at the Fulham Road store starting February 15.

Balmain, Jil Sander, Giles Deacon, Jonathan Saunders, Rupert Sanderson, and Joseph creative director Louise Trotter all hit the drawing board to create limited-edition pieces, which debut exclusively here. “We wanted to focus on designers both past and present that reflect the Joseph ethos,” Trotter said, explaining how the company whittled down the list to six, she included. “Everyone was thrilled to be asked, and thankfully most people could make the time!”

The designers also fell into line when it came to conveying the ethos of the brand. “The guiding spirit behind each piece came from the Joseph DNA: black and white. My idea of the leather tote began with one of our most iconic pieces—the stripe carrier bag,” explained Trotter. Also included in the mix are a black-and-white dress from Jonathan Saunders, a crisp white clutch from Jil Sander, and a roaring lion’s head from Balmain.

Fashion is a notoriously unforgiving business—consider each fashion year like a dog year, so for Joseph to hit twenty-five is a watershed moment that few retailers have achieved. How does Trotter account for the popularity, never mind longevity, of the brand, given the crowded retail market? “Joseph [Ettedgui, the founder] himself was a curator of new talent. His taste and spirit are still evident in the combination of designers we offer and the unique way we buy and showcase our collections,” she said of the vision of the charismatic Ettedgui, who died in 2010. “The basic principles that Joseph set out from the beginning, which are the perfect wardrobe essentials translated into luxury fabrics, is still as relevant today as when he started. We have tried to stay true to his philosophy whilst looking forward.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

Joseph Will Celebrate Its Birthday on the Runway

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Joseph EttedguiJoseph turned 25 this year (check out the famed Fulham Road store’s celebratory Michael Roberts-designed windows, which went up in September, if you missed them). To mark the quarter-century milestone, the brand will hold its first runway show on London fashion week’s official schedule this February. And for a special twist, Joseph, which was founded by the late, and much adored Joseph Ettedgui (left) has asked its creative director, Louise Trotter, as well as brands like Jil Sander, Balmain, and Giles, to design exclusive pieces, all of which will be on sale the very same day they head down the catwalk. We have to say this is our favorite type of birthday—the kind where everyone can get a present.

Photo: Getty Images

Happy Birthday, Dear Joseph

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Joseph Window

There are only a handful of shops worldwide as iconic as the Joseph on 77 Fulham Road, or known in the fashion world simply as 77. With a prized position in the heart of South Kensington, Joseph is flanked on both sides by some other icons: Daphne’s, Princess Diana’s favorite restaurant; Boujis, her son Harry’s current nightclub of choice; and, of course, Bibendum in the Michelin House, where loyal customers have been enjoying oysters and champagne for generations. That was where yours truly first met the late, great Joseph Ettedgui in 2003, sipping his espresso and puffing a cigar, those eyes squinting behind his trademark round glasses in the glorious October sun, as he put his paper down to fill me in on details of the project at that moment in his life—the renovation of his home. During our many conversations, a constant stream of people was always stopping to say hello. Joseph Ettedgui was the most popular guy in the hood, his charms and charisma irresistible.

September 14 marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of 77, and celebrations are afoot for the man who brought Kenzo, Castelbajac, Alaïa, and Yamamoto to the world and who basically created the mold for concept stores like Colette and Dover Street Market. Celebrations start by revealing twenty-five quotes from Joseph’s nearest and dearest, like Naomi Campbell, Katie Grand, and Alexandra Shulman, and they’ll live on the Joseph Web site during London fashion week.

There will also be a window during LFW designed by Vanity Fair‘s Michael Roberts, a great friend and confidante of Joseph’s who, back in the day, worked as a stylist and was all but Joseph’s “right-hand man.” The window is inspired by one of Joseph’s only fashion shows, held around twenty-five years ago, styled by Roberts, where body mapping was somewhat of a thing. Louise Trotter, Joseph’s creative director, has also created a Haring jacquard jumper, inspired by the same fashion show, which will hit the shops September 14. On the eve of the anniversary, Style.com sat down with Roberts to discuss Mr. Ettedgui, who died from cancer in 2010, at age 74.

What are your fondest memories of both Josephs—the man and the brand?
I would see Joseph with a cigar and a coffee, listening attentively, and then motivating you to just “do it.” He was a doer, making sure that things got done. There would be one central meeting, then he would spring into action. Once you had done what it was you set out to do, he would become almost childlike, exclaiming and jumping up and down in celebration and excitement. Continue Reading “Happy Birthday, Dear Joseph” »

Louise Trotter Bags It for Joseph

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Joseph's New Bags

For Louise Trotter, creative director of Joseph, releasing a handbag collection was always a matter of “when,” not “if.” With a little technical help from accessories designer Katie Hillier, Trotter has now made her vision a reality. The bags, which hit stores on Monday, are composed of a single piece of bonded cowhide mixed with side panels made from butter-soft napa leather. Devoid of any visible stitching, each bag appears seamless and malleable. “When I design for Joseph, I always look at how much I can take off,” Trotter told Style.com.

 
Trotter’s focus has been on ready-to-wear since joining the London-based brand four years ago. And, with the exception of a playful zebra print and a few splashes of color, the bags mirror the tailored sensibility and neutral palette of Joseph’s Fall ’13 line. “The bags aren’t really a diversion, as much as an extension of what I’ve been working on [in ready-to-wear],” said Trotter.

 
The collection features totes, shoulder bags, clutches, and handbags, all in soft-edged square shapes. Retailing for between $265 and $1,695, there’s no doubt the bags will appeal to Joseph devotees seeking luxury essentials. As for her style of choice, Trotter opts for the shoulder bag, which she likes to wear as a clutch with the strap dangling down. “It’s how you carry it, and your attitude, that changes it from day to evening,” she said.

Photo: Courtesy of Joseph

Australia Fashion Week Comes to a Close

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Australia fashion week wrapped in Sydney today, and Style.com’s special projects editor, Maya Singer, has been reporting back on the most exciting shows. To view our complete Australia fashion week coverage, click here.

Day 5:
Fashion week in Sydney concluded this afternoon with a show by Zambesi (left), one of the major brands from New Zealand. Even if you hadn’t known that Zambesi was based in Auckland, the clothes on the runway made it altogether clear that a non-Australian sensibility was at work. To put it plainly, Zambesi designers Elisabeth Findlay and Dayne Johnston have an affection for the eccentric and borderline frumpy that the local Sydney designers do not share at all. The men’s looks, designed by Johnston, were relatively straightforward—vaguely thuggish tailoring, plus the odd flourish like a pair of tailored wool shortalls. The womenswear, from Findlay, had a bit more range, with crispy and rather clinical white looks ebbing into more challenging pieces, such as long narrow dresses covered with fringe tassels. For both sexes, the sharpest looks were the ones in a tartan organza; very on-trend, that.

Zambesi aren’t the only carpetbaggers on the Australian fashion scene. Jewelry designer Estelle Dévé hails from the South of France, originally, but her brand is based in Melbourne, and in the five years since she launched, it has emerged as something of a cult phenomenon. Dévé’s signature pieces are plated rings with a rough-hewn look; this season, she’s elevated her aesthetic quite a bit, drawing on her French heritage for a bit of soigné, and sourcing influence from the surrealists. Standout pieces in the new collection include statement necklaces with egg-shaped crystal pendants half-covered in a dissolving layer of silver.

Dévé adapted several pieces from the new collection for a capsule range of bracelets and necklaces made in collaboration with Camilla and Marc (left). Those pieces were on the Camilla and Marc catwalk at the very start of Australian Fashion Week; so too was the jewelry work of Ryan Storer, whose dangerous-looking ear pieces adorned all the models at the show. Storey’s brand is ultra-new”—his very small debut collection is shipping to stores now, with a selection of the ear pieces due to arrive at Browns in London at any moment.

Photo: Matt Jelonek/ Getty Images (Zambesi); Courtesy of Estelle Dévé and Camilla and Marc

Continue Reading “Australia Fashion Week Comes to a Close” »