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26 posts tagged "Jourdan Dunn"

Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos Talk Target

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Jourdan Dunn

London-based label Peter Pilotto, made up of Pilotto and best friend Christopher De Vos, is known for its kaleidoscopic, futuristic, printed looks. The pair’s work is intensely intricate and, quite often, computer engineered. On February 9, they’ll follow in the footsteps of designers like Phillip Lim and Prabal Gurung when they bring their neon-hued, digi-printed womenswear to the masses via a hotly anticipated collaboration with Target. The beachy seventy-piece capsule comprises trapezoidal-cut swimwear; some very boardwalk-to-street Vans-style trainers; lots of feminine, floral-layered hoop skirts; and some rash-guard-inspired separates. The range, which is priced between $14.99 and $79.99, will be the first of Target’s designer collaborations to be sold on Net-a-Porter—a testament to the quality of the work. Also a testament to the collection? Its campaign cast—not just anybody can get Jessica Stam and Jourdan Dunn to strike a pose. The latter’s ad (above), as well as a behind-the-scenes video (below), debut exclusively here.

We sat down with Pilotto and De Vos to discuss the origins of the Target project; how they translated their detailed, techy designs within the constraints of a mass price-point; and why, at the end of the day, it’s all about the color.

How did Target approach you?
Peter Pilotto: Somebody set up the meeting, and we were like, ‘Oh, that’s great.’ We always knew about Target, obviously. We didn’t have to think much. When they asked us if we really wanted to do it, we were like, “Yeah, sure!” And the whole process was extremely pleasant. They gave us the freedom to do what we liked.

Christopher De Vos: We’re excited that, with this collaboration, we can reach a whole new audience.

PP: And we hope to reach a big audience age-wise, too—from the 15-year-old girl to the 75-year-old woman.

What was the concept behind the collection? And did you find it difficult to translate your vision to fit within the Target price point?
PP: The swimwear was the starting point. We wanted something very signature to our brand but translated in a different way—something very energetic, joyful, summery, and vibrant. We liked the idea so much that you could have a swimwear look and a skirt, and you could build up your look from beach to street.

CDV: We made almost like a rash guard, and you can wear it with a swimsuit and take off your skirt and wear it to the beach. That was the whole idea. We also analyzed our color combinations and how we could translate those. Obviously, there were limitations because of price point, but I think those limitations pushed us to do new things. And while we had to rethink our usual fabrications, we feel it’s very us.

PP: And it was exciting to work in a different way within the systems that were right for Target. We couldn’t do the engineered print that we’re used to doing, so instead, we used seams and worked on layered versions of all of our prints. I guess the collaboration was the highest amount of prints they ever did. I think often, it’s especially stimulating when you have constraints.

The palette is very in tune with what you usually send down the runway.
CDV: I think if we weren’t based in London, we’d do everything in black. But because the weather’s so gray, we’re longing for something colorful.

There is so much color coming out of London, despite all the fog.
PP: It’s very inspiring. And East London, where all the designers are based, all the artists, everybody—it’s a really good spot because of the interesting, the mix of people.

CDV: We feel like we live in a village.

Can you tell us what you have planned for Fall ’14?
PP: I think with our Spring ’14 collection, we wanted to translate our signature ideas in new ways, so we did a lot of lace and embroidery. While we’re known for the print, there is actually so much more now that we’re busy with besides the print that we love to do. It’s all about the desire for color that we try to express in different ways. Last season, we worked with lace that was engineered like the print was in the past—there were color layouts that were made in the lace, layered with print underneath. We want to explore that further, and push those techniques for Fall.

When you’re conceptualizing a collection, where do you normally begin? With this Target collaboration, you were talking about the swimwear. But is it color? Is it silhouette?
CDV: It always starts with colors. Then it’s a constant dialogue. We work together. We make every decision together. And it’s a journey through the seasons.

Photo: Courtesy of Target

Runway to Red Carpet: Ringing in the New Year with Old Friends and New Leaders

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Jourdan Dunn, Beyonce, Kaley Cuoco

On New Year’s Eve, the celebrity set went out in full force to ring in 2014, and many A-listers took to Instagram to let us in on the fun—and show off their designer duds. Beyoncé donned a black-and-gold tiger-print Versace button-down to toast the new year at the Versace mansion in Miami, where she partied with her Destiny’s Child ladies, as well as with her supermodel costar from her new video, “Yoncé.” Jourdan Dunn, who strutted alongside Queen Bey in the flick, hit Versace’s dance floor in a sheer black-and-white, contour-hugging Marios Schwab gown from his Spring ’14 runway.

Actress Kaley Cuoco started off 2014 with a bang by tying the knot on New Year’s Eve in Southern California. Cuoco wed tennis pro Ryan Sweeting in an unconventional petal pink Vera Wang tulle ball gown with gathered detailing on the bodice and appliqué Chantilly lace accents.

Wednesday saw a new year and a new mayor for New York City. At Bill de Blasio’s inauguration, his wife and NYC’s First Lady, Chirlane McCray, as well as their daughter, Chiara de Blasio, showed support for New York’s garment industry by wearing looks from local designer Nanette Lepore. McCray paired a raspberry coat with the colorful Wonderland dress, and Chiara opted for a velvet leopard-print jacket.

Photos: @officialjdunn / Instagram; @realmichellew / Instagram; @normancook / Instagram

The Modeling Moments to Remember from 2013

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Miranda KerrThere’s really never been a better time to be a model. Many will argue with me that the pinnacle of the profession was the glory days of Naomi, Christy, Linda, and Cindy. But they never had social media. In 2013, we witnessed the rise of a new class of supers who have since become household names. Cheeky Brit Cara Delevingne has amassed over 3.5 million followers on Instagram and is trailed by paparazzi everywhere she goes. Last week, Joan Smalls, Jourdan Dunn, and Chanel Iman became pop stars in their own right with the release of Beyoncé’s “Yoncé” music video, in which they dance like divas alongside Queen B. Hell, they’re even reclaiming the covers of fashion magazines.

This year, I was also thrilled to see a few of my favorite catwalk veterans make comebacks. Naomi herself had jaws on the floor when she opened and closed the Atelier Versace show—looking fiercer than ever—back in July. After a couple of years off the runways, Catherine McNeil walked in forty-two Fall shows (she’s kept the momentum going with a profusion of ad campaigns and editorials, in addition to an impressive Spring season), and Daria Werbowy had a cameo at Balenciaga. Who doesn’t love @dotwillow? As for the hottest newcomer? That prize goes to Edie Campbell, who was crowned Model of the Year earlier this month at the British Fashion Awards.

Here, a year’s worth of model high points.

Beyoncé and Terry Richardson Took a Trip to Coney Island

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Looks like Beyoncé and Miley Cyrus have something in common after all. “XO,” one of the seventeen videos included on Mrs. Carter’s new self-titled album that caused the Internet to combust after its surprise release on Friday, was directed by Terry Richardson—yes, the same Terry Richardson responsible for Cyrus’ nude ride on a wrecking ball. However, starring models Jourdan Dunn and Jessica White and shot on Coney Island, Bey’s vid, while tastefully gritty, is predictably more highbrow. Have a watch, above.

Behind Beyoncé’s “Yonce”: Supermodels, Sex, and Supreme

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Beyonce
Beyonce, Jourdan Dunn, Joan Smalls, and Chanel Iman

From the time she launched her new, self-titled album at 12:01 a.m.—without any warning, press, leaks, or buildup buzz—today has been the Day of Beyoncé. The new Beyoncé features fourteen tracks and a full seventeen videos. One in particular has caught the attention of the Bey Hive: “‘Yonce,” which stars not only Bey, but also three of the fashion world’s top models—Jourdan Dunn, Joan Smalls, and Chanel Iman—in an homage of sorts to George Michael’s famous supermodel-filled “Freedom ’90″ video. Director, video artist, and co-head of creative at Supreme, Ricky Saiz, shot the video over two days in Brooklyn. “When I started to propose ideas and put together a visual narrative, Beyoncé responded really well,” he said. “She was open to me pushing a bit, and to trying new things, and I didn’t want it to be overproduced. I didn’t want a performance video, which is like jazz hands. This was more like an upskirt.”

“Upskirt” does set the racy tone. Saiz was inspired by Daido Moriyama’s erotic photographs as well as the iconic George Michael Video—and styled by Karen Langley, the cast dons an array of revealing outfits, including a black Anthony Vaccarello dress (for Dunn) and a bondage-inspired molded bodysuit from Tom Ford’s tenure at YSL (for Beyoncé).

Here, Saiz talks to Style.com about the singer’s most smoldering video to date, what it was like working with the one of the world’s biggest stars and a trio of supermodels, and that time on set when Smalls decided to lick Beyoncé’s breast.

How did you come to work with Beyoncé on this in the first place?
It was very all of a sudden, actually. I have a working relationship with Todd Tourso, her creative director. We worked together on the 2011 Lady Gaga for Supreme campaign that we put together. He called me out of the blue and said they wanted me to do a video for them. Four days later, we did it. It was very fast, all of a sudden, and fun. I think Beyoncé is an incredible artist—she has ability, reach, and doesn’t compromise. She’s always kind of done her own thing. But the project that they approached me with was very much in my lane, and my aesthetic. If they had me do a big, drawn-out, cinematic production kind of video, I probably wouldn’t have done as good of a job.

What was the brief that Beyoncé and her team gave you? What were they asking for?
They came with a pretty broad concept. They had the models in line, and wanted something pretty simple. The brief was in the direction of George Michael’s “Freedom” video. And I kind of took it from there. I felt like doing something really simple, handheld, lo-fi. It felt like an interesting way of doing it. It could come off so bland if filmed the other way. And again, I wanted to explore her transgressive imagery. Things that were sexual and erotic, but not cliché. I didn’t want to see Beyoncé with her tongue out, you know?

How is this display of sexuality different from what Miley Cyrus does in “Wrecking Ball”?
Beyoncé is so sexy without having to do anything. I felt like she didn’t need to be wet, or need to twerk. It was more about a mature sense of eroticism, like what Madonna expressed in “Human Nature” in the nineties. A lot of the inspiration came from still photography. Like Daido Moriyama’s really tight close-ups of fishnets—things that felt abstract but still resonate.

What was Beyoncé’s reaction to your creative process? Was she very hands-on?
She’s incredible. She was very hands-on, and everything was a collaborative effort. I think once she saw my aesthetic and references in the styling and art direction, she had full trust in my ideas for the video. I’ve never worked with anyone that gave so much, and was so willing to try new things. For example, the styling; Karen Langley brought this Tom Ford [for YSL] molded-breast bodysuit with the pierced nipple, fishnets, and things like that. It was exactly the references that I was looking for, but in my head I was like, Yeah, right. We’re never getting Bey to put that on. And Beyoncé’s so incredible, she was like, “Let’s do it.” I don’t think anyone’s seen her like that. She was into it.

Do you have a sense of why Beyoncé tapped Jourdan, Joan, and Chanel for this project?
They came to me with these three women in mind. It just felt very of-the-moment, very iconic. You know, they’re all supermodels, they stand on their own, they’re such powerful women. And when brought together, it created a whole dynamic. We definitely weren’t trying to put together a “girl group.” But the chemistry on set was amazing. People just came in really excited about the project, and I tried to keep things loose and fun. I wanted you to see something you maybe weren’t supposed to see.

The “Freedom” video worked because the girls were supermodelséthe first generation of so-called supers, in fact. Do you see these women as the new generation?
Absolutely. I think that in addition to being extremely beautiful, they have their own characters, and their own personalities that they brought to the table. They were anything but casted models.

Did you have any favorite moments on set?
When Joan Smalls licked Beyoncé’s boob. I’m probably not going to forget that anytime soon. To be honest, I didn’t even see it happen. I was in between monitors. I saw it in playback. My director of photography came up to me and was like, “Oh, my God, did you see that?” It was totally spontaneous. [Smalls] just went in. It was fun. We had a good time.