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32 posts tagged "Juergen Teller"

Empress Beckham?

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Victoria BeckhamToday’s T Magazine feature on Victoria Beckham paints the stiletto-wearing pop-star-turned-designer as a real go-getter. “I want to get bigger and bigger,” she said. “I absolutely want an empire.” Granted, much of that go-getting was reportedly spurred by the fact that she couldn’t find anything to wear. “I wanted to create handbags because I couldn’t find the right handbag that I wanted to carry. Then I couldn’t find the right sunglasses, so I decided to make my own sunglasses,” she explained. Other highlights include Beckham telling Juergen Teller that she doesn’t want anyone to know that she eats (“Why ruin that?” she asks), David Beckham’s undercover culinary skills, and the secret behind Posh’s supposed aversion to smiling.

Photo: Peter Michael Dills/ Getty Images

Kristen McMenamy Through The Years

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As the self-proclaimed “first weird-looking model,” Kristen McMenamy has broken just about every rule there is during her thirty years (and counting) in fashion, which exactly is why we chose to profile her in the new issue of Style.com/Print. Throughout her career, the irreverent icon became renowned for her androgynous appeal, eccentric personality, madwoman-on-a-mission runway walk, and willingness to sacrifice life and limb in pursuit of the elusive perfect picture.

McMenamy was a fixture in the glossies during her nineties heyday (back then, her cropped hair, shaved eyebrows, unconventional features, and sinewy frame made her an ideal poster girl for the grunge movement); she has shot with the likes of Steven Meisel, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Juergen Teller, and Nick Knight, who took the pared-down portraits of her that run in Style.com/Print. Along the way, she has cultivated a support system of designers. “If fashion is her family, then Donatella Versace is her big sister,” writes Jo-Ann Furniss in her profile. That makes Karl Lagerfeld McMenamy’s proverbial father. Lagerfeld did, after all, walk her down the aisle at her ’99 wedding to photographer Miles Aldridge, in addition to casting her in a multitude of campaigns and runway shows.

See them all in our slideshow roundup of McMenamy’s career highlights >

Fashion’s Figures: Then And Now

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What determines the feminine ideal? Mannequin—Le corps de la mode (“Model: The Body of Fashion”), the latest of Paris’ Musée Galliera’s off-site exhibitions, aims to find an answer. The show, which runs from February 16 through May 19, examines why trends like wasp waists, swan necks, or 5′ 11″ frames (à la Karlie Kloss) have driven women’s aesthetic aspirations since the first models replaced store mannequins in late-nineteenth-century Paris.

Curator Sylvie Lécallier sifted through fashion magazine illustrations, photographs, and videos to chart the jump from one fashionable body type to the next: the twenties knock-kneed flappers, the sixties childlike Courrèges girls “sans hips, waists, or breasts,” the eighties power women who were captured in Helmut Newton’s “Big Nudes,” and beyond. The show includes photos of the earliest It girls, like a series of Nelly Martyl, a star of Paris’ Opéra Comique in the 1910s. She was one of the first stars to be featured as a model in the era’s top fashion magazines. Also on display are iconic images like Corinne Day’s 1990 shot of a topless Kate Moss, Juergen Teller’s 1996 photo of a nude Kristen McMenamy (she has “Versace” painted on her chest inside a red heart), dark surreal works by Guy Bourdin, and more. Continue Reading “Fashion’s Figures: Then And Now” »

Woo-hoo! Juergen Teller Opens at the ICA

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Artist, photographer, and all-around troublemaker Juergen Teller’s latest exhibition, Woo, opens at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts tomorrow. And, as always with Teller’s work, it promises to be a visual and conceptual feast. Covering the photographer’s extensive career, which spans over twenty years, the show will include some of his most iconic fashion and pop-culture works, like images of Vivienne Westwood (above), Kurt Cobain, Lily Cole, and Kate Moss (below), as well as shots from his innovative and sometimes shocking Marc Jacobs campaigns (remember when he shot Victoria Beckham’s suggestively parted legs popping out of an MJ shopping bag?).

Teller’s photographs aren’t all fashion focused, though—his art photography, which most recently includes landscapes and intimate family portraits, will be featured, as will shots and witty writings from his controversial column in Die Zeit magazine (think photos of Teller passed out next to a roasted pig’s head). The letters of complaint that Teller’s Die Zeit contributions elicited from readers will be proudly displayed next to the photographer’s work.

Woo runs from January 23 through March 17 at London’s ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH, +44 20 7930 3647.

Photos: Above—Juergen Teller, Vivienne Westwood No.3, London, 2009; Below—Juergen Teller, Kate Moss No.12, Gloucestershire, 2010. Courtesy of Lehmann Maupin Gallery

Fashion’s Bodies, Real And Fake, Get Their Night At The Museum

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In French, mannequin is used to describe flesh-and-blood models; in English, it means the artificial dummies used to display clothes. Rarely do the two mannequins exist side by side—except in Kim Cattrall eighties hits—but they will in an upcoming exhibition at the Les Docks space of Paris’ Musée Galliera, Mannequin—Le corps de la mode (“Model: The Body of Fashion”). The exhibition traces the development of the model throughout time, much as the Costume Institute’s 2009 show, “The Model as Muse,” did, and includes both physical mannequins (in the English sense) and photographs by Horst P. Horst, Juergen Teller, Corinne Day, and Nick Knight—and some line-straddlers, like the photo by Guy Bourdin above. She’s alive!

Photo: Guy Bourdin / WWD