Style.com

July 31 2014

styledotcom 12 celeb-inspired looks, and where to buy them: stylem.ag/1pqIaCM pic.twitter.com/DbiSNzNsXD

Subscribe to Style Magazine
26 posts tagged "Julie Gilhart"

Wine for Breakfast with Ecco Domani

-------

Nine thirty may seem a little early for a wine tasting. But winemaker Ecco Domani had to serve a little something (specifically, its new Blue Moscato) to toast the winners of its 2013 Fashion Foundation awards. Yesterday morning, the likes of fashion consultant Julie Gilhart, Neiman Marcus’ Ken Downing, and Paper‘s Kim Hastreiter (all of whom helped select this year’s honorees) gathered at the Museum of Arts and Design to fete TOME (designed by Ryan Lobo and Ramon Martin), Ian Velardi, Deborah Pagani, and Susan Woo. Each of the emerging brands and designers took home a $25,000 grant to fund their upcoming Fall presentations at New York fashion week. “There was an exceptional group this year,” said judge Sally Singer, who cited women’s wear label TOME as particularly impressive. “These prizes are intended to support and reward emerging talent, and this really was a new-wave kind of year.”

This year’s designers join the ranks of previous winners like Proenza Schouler, Alexander Wang, Zac Posen, and Prabal Gurung. The latter attended today’s breakfast as a guest speaker. “When you look at the people who have won in the past, it’s not only a huge boost of confidence, it confirms working this hard has been worth it,” said Woo, winner of the Sustainable Design category. Menswear winner Ian Velardi, who will show his collection for the first time at New York fashion week, echoed the sentiment, saying, “This is probably one of the greatest accomplishments in my life, let alone my career.” How does Gurung feel the award affected his career trajectory? “It changed the landscape of my business early on by simply getting people to notice who I was,” the designer told Style.com. The EDFF alum, who debuts his capsule collection for Target next week, did not leave without offering the rookies some sage advice: “Have the vision of where you want to go but don’t lose sight of where you are. Be present and dare to dream.”

Photos: Andy Kropa/ Getty Images

Ecco Domani’s 2013 Winners Announced

-------

Winemaker Ecco Domani’s Fashion Foundation Awards—an initiative that aims to support New York’s up-and-coming talents—has helped jump-start the careers of Prabal Gurung, Rodarte’s Kate and Laura Mulleavy, Alexander Wang, and Derek Lam, just to name a few. Today, the foundation’s 2013 winners, each of whom will be given a $25,000 grant to help them present their collections at New York Fashion Week, were announced. A panel that includes Vogue‘s Sally Singer, consultant Julie Gilhart, Neiman Marcus’ Ken Downing, and Paper magazine editor in chief Kim Hastreiter (among others), selected honorees in four categories: Tome, a New York-based label launched in 2011 by Australian designers Ryan Lobo and Ramon Martin, won the womenswear category (left: a look from their Spring ’13 collection). Ian Velardi won for menswear, Susan Woo was honored for sustainable design, and Deborah Pagani won for her line of accessories inspired by Art Deco and rock ’n’ roll. The awardees will be toasted during a luncheon on January 30.

Photo: Courtesy of Tome

On Our Radar: Byronesque

-------

Tired of trolling eBay for the perfect vintage find? Perhaps it’s time to switch gears to Byronesque, an online vintage marketplace that combines carefully selected retro-wares (nothing under 20 years old), provocative interviews (Boy George is currently on the site with Vivienne Westwood and Julie Gilhart coming soon), and high-styled editorials. Launched in October by Gill Linton and backed by heavyweights like Theory CEO Andrew Rosen and Marvin Traub Associates, the site features covetable pieces like a YSL Rive Gauche skirt from the late seventies, and eighties looks from Thierry Mugler (left), Alaïa, and Chanel. Sourcing items from acclaimed vintage shops like New York’s New World Order and London’s One of a Kind, Byronesque also offers a personal shopping feature to help hunt down those hard-to-find pieces, as well as a subscription-only archive called The Back Room for designers in search of a little inspiration. Naturally, this kind of vintage bliss doesn’t run cheap (pieces run between $295 and just over $5,000—it might be back to eBay for those bargains after all). But if you’re going to splurge, it may as well be on a little piece of history.

Photo: Courtesy of Byronesque

Please, Do Touch The Art

-------

Last night at Artisanal House, a renovated Chelsea town home turned gallery, Victoria Bartlett presented her Spring 2013 VPL collection to close friends and fans. But in true VPL style, this was no ordinary presentation; rather, it was a fusion of art, fashion, and whimsy, a combo the designer has mastered. Bartlett transformed the modern space via art by jewelry designer Jill Platner (who also co-hosted the event with Il Buco’s Donna Lennard). And while some guests weren’t exactly sure how to navigate around the jeweler-cum-artist’s giant moving honeycomb sculptures that dangled from the ceiling, Platner encouraged them to interact with the works. “It’s meant to move! It’s meant to be touched!” she assured. Bartlett enlisted a little audience participation, too. The designer asked some of her closest friends, like Arden Wohl, Julie Gilhart, and Tomoko Ogura, to model her new wares. Each picked out her favorite Spring 2013 VPL dress to flaunt. “We’ve got an army of really strong women!” said Bartlett of her models. “They’re all like family.”

Photo: Studiowebber.com

Parsons: The First 18

-------

“I think what the students have in common is that they each have an individual voice,” said Shelley Fox, the director of the new MFA Fashion Design and Society course at Parsons School of Design. The course is the first of its kind in New York. And on Saturday, at Made Fashion Week at Milk Studios, its first 18 graduates (hailing from 13 countries) sent the fruits of their labor down the catwalk. Donna Karan, who was a strong supporter of the course and instrumental in its inception, turned up to cheer on the grads. “Although I was a student at Parsons, I found myself hiring a lot of people from Louise Wilson at Central Saint Martins in London and I said, ‘Wait, how come we don’t have a graduate program in New York?’ ” said Karan. Wilson herself crossed the pond to attend the show. She shared the front row with the likes of Fern Mallis, Julie Gilhart, and Bill Cunningham—not a bad turnout for a student production.

The show opened with looks by Lucia Cuba. With a background in social psychology, the Peruvian designer created a sartorial expression of activism, commenting on women’s issues and politics in Lima. The clothes combined 1950s silhouettes with prints of women’s crotches or pictures of a young Alberto Fujimori (a dictator who has been jailed for human rights abuses). Paula Cheng’s collection of webbed, multitextural silver and gray knits was another standout (pictured).

Students explored concepts of deconstruction and reconstruction (like show-closer Talia Shuvalov’s sweatshirts embellished with vintage tees that she took apart and rewove, or Jun Juyeon Hong’s impeccable wool suiting that featured unexpected lines, layers, and cutouts) and minimalism (like Beckett Fogg’s embossed leather and chiffon collection, or Noriko Kikuchi’s ethereal white looks based on emptiness) and showed no fear when it came to color. Liverpool native Carly Ellis was particularly courageous in her sporty, techno looks. Backstage, the purple-haired designer explained that she was inspired by vivid tourist pictures she snapped in New York as well as fragmented Skype images and the geometric painting rituals of South Africa’s Ndebele tribe. Sinéad Lawlor’s tailored button-photo print collection, which featured smart suiting combined with knitting techniques and lace, was another colorful offering. Each of the collections was conceptually rich and, at times, complicated, but many of the designs seemed not only wearable but sellable, too.

Photo: Courtesy of Parsons School of Design