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July 25 2014

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7 posts tagged "Just One Eye"

Julien Dossena Talks Paco Rabanne, Atto, and Paris’ Shifting Landscape

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Julien DossenaLVMH Prize finalist. Creative director of Paco Rabanne. Founder of the fledgling label Atto. French designer Julien Dossena is juggling a lot of roles this spring, but he was in New York last week wearing his Paco Rabanne hat. Dossena replaced Manish Arora at Rabanne early last year shortly after leaving Balenciaga, where he worked under Nicolas Ghesquière. By his own account, he has his work cut out for him at Rabanne. Outside of France and fashion circles, the brand is known for little more than perfume and men’s cologne, despite the late designer’s groundbreaking designs of the 1960s. Jane Fonda wouldn’t have been half as convincing as Barbarella without her Rabanne chain mail, and photos of pretty young things in his metal shifts encapsulate the futurism and free love of the era. But the company has floundered in recent years. “The image of the brand before was a bit blurry,” Dossena said. “Now we are taking back the reins.” Over lunch with Style.com, the designer talked Jane Birkin, Françoise Hardy, and why chain mail will always be essential.

How did Paco Rabanne sales go for Fall?We got opinion-leader kind of shops: Corso Como, Maria Luisa, The Webster, Blake, Just One Eye, Dover Street Market in New York and London. It’s a good start. And Barneys for the bags.

Did any piece in particular connect with buyers?We really wanted to emphasize a daywear wardrobe, but—there’s always a but—the stores need a bit of chain mail on the rack. People love it, they buy it. The challenge is to figure out how we can integrate chain mail into a daywear wardrobe.

As you say, the vision of the brand was blurry before. How do you intend to clear it up?
If women have only one Paco Rabanne dress in their closets, the brand isn’t going to develop. So we want to move away from the super-embroidered dresses that were the base of Rabanne before. We want to make it a classic brand for a younger customer. This season, we got the stores we need to deliver that commercial message. Now we’re working on our first pre-collection. We’re going to open our first shop in about a year and a half. Those are the first steps to having a strong brand.

Where will the shop be?
In Paris. Paco Rabanne is a classic from the sixties like Courrèges or Cardin. It can compete now with Balmain, Carven, those kinds of names. Paco Rabanne can be one of them. In France, Paco Rabanne is really deep in the culture. People love the name in France. I don’t know about America.

People who know fashion here know Jane Birkin and Françoise Hardy in the dresses—those cool metal dresses.
That’s what we want to bring back, that coolness that we love from those images. The question is how to translate those images into new product. If there’s a main word that we’re trying to do, it’s effortless.

To be a successful revival brand these days, you can’t just be about the past, right?
It has to be a balance of not losing the signature, but not being impressed by it, either—not being controlled by it. In five, six, seven years, Paco could become a lifestyle brand. Like if you travel, what kind of clothes do you want to wear? If you go to the countryside on the weekend, what do you want to take? I’m super-interested in that aspect and bringing that together with the visual futuristic signature of Paco Rabanne. It’s a good challenge. The good thing, I hope, is that we cleaned the image of the brand quite fast. And now we can move forward.

Paco Rabanne

No one was paying much attention to the label, but very quickly you seem to have caught people’s attention.
I hope. The name deserves it.

Do you think launching your own brand, Atto, at the same time as you signed on at Paco Rabanne has been helpful?
Yes. You learn so much on your own. When you launch your own brand, you have to be super-logical. Basically, it’s either you can do that or you can’t. That’s all. It teaches you not to be afraid to say, “OK, we can’t make a show? Don’t make a show.” But also to find the power in not making a show by really focusing on your products.

That’s what I wanted to do after I left Balenciaga. At Balenciaga I was working on the shows, and when you design clothes for a show it’s totally different than when you design for a customer. Paco Rabanne has taught me that a good basic with a little something more can be super-interesting. Each look has to go on a woman, has to be relevant.

But is it hard to manage two brands?
I just started wondering about that now. It happened randomly that I started Atto and Paco at the same time. I launched Atto in December [2012] just after Balenciaga. Then Paco called me for freelance in mid-January. Now that we’re adding pre-collection in Paco, I wonder what is the best way to keep the balance. At the end, the signature is me. Of course I have the Paco name to hold on to, but in the end, it’s what I think is good.

How is the Paco girl different from the Atto girl?
She’s different, but she’s still my girl. Maybe at Paco she’s more sensual, she’s more rich. At Atto, her look is more sharp, more clean.

Are you going to stick to showing Atto by appointment only during the pre-collections?
Yes, I don’t want it to go too fast or too big. I really want to take my time and enjoy it. To not put pressure on me or the collection. What I’d love to do is co-branding, or collaborations with people who have a specific technique or savoir faire, like Atto Mackintosh, Atto and Charvet shirts. That’s a dream. I love the Comme des Garçons model—you know the way they do those jackets with Barbour. I love that. They keep the essence of Barbour, but they add all their craziness and twists to it.

I’m almost afraid to do a show for Atto because I worry that I will lose the aim of Atto. Doing a show totally transforms your vision of your clothes. It makes you think about the casting, all these kinds of things. When I design Atto now, I say, “OK, is the girl going to be comfortable in that dress? What can she mix it with?” I’m afraid to lose that mix-and-match, modular feeling of Atto.

What about the LVMH award? You’re one of the twelve finalists, for Atto. Congratulations.
I was super-honored and super-happy. You know, in France, there is not much support for young designers and young brands. It’s really hopeful when you see that a big group like LVMH is looking at what young designers are doing. It’s a good thing. It means you are not playing anymore. It’s serious. If Atto doesn’t win, we already won, just to be part of the designer group. It’s quite an eclectic group of finalists. And I’m so happy it’s going on in Paris, you know, finally.

There is something moving. My friends and I are super-happy that J.W. Anderson is coming to Loewe, that Nicolas Ghesquière is coming to Vuitton. You can feel a good energy now in Paris.

Photo: Patrick Demarchelier; InDigital Images 

Designer Diary: Clare Waight Keller’s Postcard From L.A.

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Last week, Chloé designer Clare Waight Keller and her family flew from Paris to Los Angeles—partially for work, but also for pleasure. Here, she shares her snapshots of surfers, palm tree forests, and vintage vans exclusively with Style.com.

Coachella Valley Preserve

Surrounded by a forest of palms in the Coachella Valley Preserve, where the palm trees reach seven stories high. They are the most incredible sight and grow around an oasis, which is so peaceful and otherworldly you can’t believe it is only two hours from L.A.

Temperature in California

The amazing temperature in California. I love it!

Hiking

On my day off before heading to L.A., I hiked on the top of the San Jacinto Mountains in Palm Desert. It’s one of the highest peaks in California at 8,250 feet, with a vertical climb to 10,500 feet. It is absolutely stunning. There’s incredibly fresh air and the smell of pine trees and amazing views. You go from desert cactus at the bottom of the mountain to snow at the top!

Surfers at Santa Monica Beach

Surfers early on Sunday morning. I always head down to Santa Monica Beach to see them out on the waves. Continue Reading “Designer Diary: Clare Waight Keller’s Postcard From L.A.” »

Clamdiggin With Simone Camille

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Simone Camille x Clamdiggin

Another collaboration? Don’t stop reading yet—this isn’t your average mash-up. West Coast art stars Kevin Johnson and Alexandra Fisher of Clamdiggin have joined forces with handbag designer Simone Harouche to create a truly original collection. “Clamdiggin painted my son’s nursery, and I have been obsessed with them ever since,” Harouche told Style.com. “Their aesthetics are all very organic and fluid. I knew I wanted to work with them on something special.”

Best known for her handbags made of antique textiles (and for styling celebs like Nicole Richie), Harouche asked Fisher and Johnson to hand-paint twenty-five New Zealand deerskin bags. Backpacks, flat clutches, and structured satchels got the Clamdiggin treatment and were embellished with the swirling, nature-inspired illustrations that have become the duo’s signature.

Typically, Johnson and Fisher work on a much larger scale—they painted the giant slate murals at Spago Beverly Hills and designed wall coverings for Kelly Wearstler. “As varied and whimsical as some of their subjects may be, it somehow all works together in one beautiful story,” Harouche said. “I like to think my design aesthetic for Simone Camille handbags is the same.”

Simone Camille x Clamdiggin handbags start at $1,200 and will be available from November 1 at Just One Eye in Los Angeles or online at www.simonecamille.com.

Eat Your Heart Out, Zagat

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The Fashion Friendly Guide to Los AngelesCarole Sabas’ in-the-know guides to such cities as Miami, Paris, and New York are joined this week by The Fashion Friendly Guide to Los Angeles. The Paris Vogue contributor interviewed nearly forty fashion insiders to get their tips on everything from the perfect wood-fired pizza to painless facial extractions. Johnny Depp’s tattoo parlor of choice? Shamrock Social Club. The Rodarte sisters’ favorite cult movie houses? You’ll have to pick up the book.

Both Sabas and those she consulted for the guide (among them Angela Lindvall, Kate Bosworth, and Rachel Zoe) are quick to dispel misconceptions of a city often filtered through the lens of TMZ. “The most open city [I've written about] is definitely Los Angeles,” Sabas told Style.com. “I was amazed at how generous the people are! They like when people love the city and try to understand more than the celebrity culture.”

The tome’s cover features art from Sabas’ regular collaborator Caroline Andrieu. The illustrator created an ethereal portrait of quintessential L.A. It girl (and Mark “The Cobrasnake” Hunter’s girlfriend), model Diane Rosser. “I just love having her on the cover. To me she really represents this West Coast lifestyle,” Sabas says. “[Los Angeles] is very wild and very inspirational. It’s about freedom. You can be whatever you want.”

Below, Sabas consults her new release to map out a perfect L.A. day, exclusively for Style.com.

The Fashion Friendly Guide to Los Angeles is now available online and in-store at McNally Jackson, and later this week at Colette.

Continue Reading “Eat Your Heart Out, Zagat” »

Wilfredo Rosado Fall 2013

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Label: Wilfredo Rosado

Need to Know: After years of working with Giorgio Armani, Wilfredo Rosado realized his dream was to launch his own fine jewelry collection. And in 2011, he did just that. Top international retailers like Bergdorf Goodman and Lane Crawford quickly snatched up his unique pieces. His cameos were an instant success, Gwyneth Paltrow wore his pink feather and diamond earrings to the 2011 Grammys, and ever since debuting his first collection, editors and buyers alike have championed his extravagant, eccentric take on diamonds.

When asked about his Fall ’13 collection, Rosado told Style.com that he has always been a fan of the Smoke series of burned furniture by the Dutch designer Maarten Baas. He’s fascinated by the idea of creating high-luxury pieces and treating them as common, non-precious objects. You can’t get much more precious than 18-karat gold set with sapphires, diamonds, and emeralds. But for Fall, Rosado inlaid his decadent wares with burned wood. He tells us they’re meant to be worn as everyday accessories.

He Says: “Should I call this collection ‘HOT’? I just want women—or men, for that matter—to look and feel cool wearing it, without feeling like they’re wearing the family jewels!”

Where to Find It: Bergdorf Goodman, Just One Eye, Neiman Marcus