Style.com
Subscribe to Style Magazine
64 posts tagged "J.W. Anderson"

Who Might Be the Next Alexander McQueen? NewGen Spring 2015 Designers Announced

-------

newgen-sizedSome of fashion’s greatest talents have been NewGen winners, from Alexander McQueen to J.W. Anderson to Christopher Kane. Today, the British Fashion Council announced its next crop of rising stars who will receive support from NewGen and Topshop to show their Spring ’15 collections at London fashion week. Who will be the next Mary Katrantzou or Nicholas Kirkwood? According to the NewGen committee, it’s Lucas Nascimento, 1205, Marques’Almeida (Fall 2014 collection, pictured, left), Ashley Williams, Danielle Romeril, Faustine Steinmetz, Ryan Lo, and Claire Borrow. (Many of them are making their return to NewGen, but Williams and Steinmetz are first-timers.)

As part of the program, each of them will present on the LFW schedule (September 12-16), and they’ll have their own showroom for four hours after their show for sales appointments with buyers.

NewGen is the BFC’s primary outlet for supporting the best of London’s up-and-coming designers. Chaired by Sarah Mower, the NewGen committee selects designers they believe have the creativity, design aesthetic, and point of difference to handle NewGen’s program. The BFC also gives each designer individualized support and access to business seminars to help them build their global brands.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos

With a New CEO and E-Commerce on the Way, J.W. Anderson Strives for Success

-------

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson‘s Jonathan Anderson is making some big moves on the business front. The London-based designer has hired a seasoned CEO, Simon Whitehouse, who previously held executive posts at Diesel and Matthew Williamson; has set up shop in his new 4,000-square-foot headquarters in Dalston, and is set to launch e-commerce on June 16. These are the first major business-oriented developments for Anderson, who also serves as the creative director at Loewe, since LVMH took a minority stake in his budding brand last year. No doubt, this is just the beginning of Anderson’s evolution from fledgling British talent to international luxury label. But the 29-year-old has wisely taken a slow-and-steady approach, rather than diving in headfirst. “When you are doing this level of work it is like kind of training for a marathon,” he told The Business of Fashion. “You cannot take the whole thing at once and sprint it.”

Photo: Ami Sioux / Style.com PRINT  

EXCLUSIVE: MAN Announces Its Spring ’15 Lineup

-------

MANBelieve it or not, it’s already time to start thinking about the Spring ’15 collections. The menswear shows kick off in London on June 15, and this season, Topman and Fashion East’s MAN initiative will continue its support of up-and-coming talents by offering three emerging designers the chance to send their collections down the runway. For Spring ’15, MAN alum Bobby Abley (left), whose quirky, quintessentially British looks have been worn by M.I.A, A$AP Rocky, and Azealia Banks, will be joined by two fresh faces: Nicomede Talavera and Liam Hodges. The former is a Central Saint Martins grad who’s already amassed an impressive group of stockists since his Fall ’14 debut at Fashion East. The latter, another Fashion East alum, aims to explore a new, democratic breed of luxury, and counts Drake among his fans. “MAN really does continue to nurture new talent,” Topman’s Gordon Richardson told Style.com. “With 26 designers graduating to date, it continues to provide the future of menswear with the aspiring young talent that may prosper and grow into the big stars of the future.” Considering that the likes of J.W. Anderson, Craig Green, Agi & Sam, and Astrid Andersen all got their menswear starts on the MAN stage, we look forward to seeing what Spring’s promising trio turns out during the show on June 15.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com

Julien Dossena Talks Paco Rabanne, Atto, and Paris’ Shifting Landscape

-------

Julien DossenaLVMH Prize finalist. Creative director of Paco Rabanne. Founder of the fledgling label Atto. French designer Julien Dossena is juggling a lot of roles this spring, but he was in New York last week wearing his Paco Rabanne hat. Dossena replaced Manish Arora at Rabanne early last year shortly after leaving Balenciaga, where he worked under Nicolas Ghesquière. By his own account, he has his work cut out for him at Rabanne. Outside of France and fashion circles, the brand is known for little more than perfume and men’s cologne, despite the late designer’s groundbreaking designs of the 1960s. Jane Fonda wouldn’t have been half as convincing as Barbarella without her Rabanne chain mail, and photos of pretty young things in his metal shifts encapsulate the futurism and free love of the era. But the company has floundered in recent years. “The image of the brand before was a bit blurry,” Dossena said. “Now we are taking back the reins.” Over lunch with Style.com, the designer talked Jane Birkin, Françoise Hardy, and why chain mail will always be essential.

How did Paco Rabanne sales go for Fall?We got opinion-leader kind of shops: Corso Como, Maria Luisa, The Webster, Blake, Just One Eye, Dover Street Market in New York and London. It’s a good start. And Barneys for the bags.

Did any piece in particular connect with buyers?We really wanted to emphasize a daywear wardrobe, but—there’s always a but—the stores need a bit of chain mail on the rack. People love it, they buy it. The challenge is to figure out how we can integrate chain mail into a daywear wardrobe.

As you say, the vision of the brand was blurry before. How do you intend to clear it up?
If women have only one Paco Rabanne dress in their closets, the brand isn’t going to develop. So we want to move away from the super-embroidered dresses that were the base of Rabanne before. We want to make it a classic brand for a younger customer. This season, we got the stores we need to deliver that commercial message. Now we’re working on our first pre-collection. We’re going to open our first shop in about a year and a half. Those are the first steps to having a strong brand.

Where will the shop be?
In Paris. Paco Rabanne is a classic from the sixties like Courrèges or Cardin. It can compete now with Balmain, Carven, those kinds of names. Paco Rabanne can be one of them. In France, Paco Rabanne is really deep in the culture. People love the name in France. I don’t know about America.

People who know fashion here know Jane Birkin and Françoise Hardy in the dresses—those cool metal dresses.
That’s what we want to bring back, that coolness that we love from those images. The question is how to translate those images into new product. If there’s a main word that we’re trying to do, it’s effortless.

To be a successful revival brand these days, you can’t just be about the past, right?
It has to be a balance of not losing the signature, but not being impressed by it, either—not being controlled by it. In five, six, seven years, Paco could become a lifestyle brand. Like if you travel, what kind of clothes do you want to wear? If you go to the countryside on the weekend, what do you want to take? I’m super-interested in that aspect and bringing that together with the visual futuristic signature of Paco Rabanne. It’s a good challenge. The good thing, I hope, is that we cleaned the image of the brand quite fast. And now we can move forward.

Paco Rabanne

No one was paying much attention to the label, but very quickly you seem to have caught people’s attention.
I hope. The name deserves it.

Do you think launching your own brand, Atto, at the same time as you signed on at Paco Rabanne has been helpful?
Yes. You learn so much on your own. When you launch your own brand, you have to be super-logical. Basically, it’s either you can do that or you can’t. That’s all. It teaches you not to be afraid to say, “OK, we can’t make a show? Don’t make a show.” But also to find the power in not making a show by really focusing on your products.

That’s what I wanted to do after I left Balenciaga. At Balenciaga I was working on the shows, and when you design clothes for a show it’s totally different than when you design for a customer. Paco Rabanne has taught me that a good basic with a little something more can be super-interesting. Each look has to go on a woman, has to be relevant.

But is it hard to manage two brands?
I just started wondering about that now. It happened randomly that I started Atto and Paco at the same time. I launched Atto in December [2012] just after Balenciaga. Then Paco called me for freelance in mid-January. Now that we’re adding pre-collection in Paco, I wonder what is the best way to keep the balance. At the end, the signature is me. Of course I have the Paco name to hold on to, but in the end, it’s what I think is good.

How is the Paco girl different from the Atto girl?
She’s different, but she’s still my girl. Maybe at Paco she’s more sensual, she’s more rich. At Atto, her look is more sharp, more clean.

Are you going to stick to showing Atto by appointment only during the pre-collections?
Yes, I don’t want it to go too fast or too big. I really want to take my time and enjoy it. To not put pressure on me or the collection. What I’d love to do is co-branding, or collaborations with people who have a specific technique or savoir faire, like Atto Mackintosh, Atto and Charvet shirts. That’s a dream. I love the Comme des Garçons model—you know the way they do those jackets with Barbour. I love that. They keep the essence of Barbour, but they add all their craziness and twists to it.

I’m almost afraid to do a show for Atto because I worry that I will lose the aim of Atto. Doing a show totally transforms your vision of your clothes. It makes you think about the casting, all these kinds of things. When I design Atto now, I say, “OK, is the girl going to be comfortable in that dress? What can she mix it with?” I’m afraid to lose that mix-and-match, modular feeling of Atto.

What about the LVMH award? You’re one of the twelve finalists, for Atto. Congratulations.
I was super-honored and super-happy. You know, in France, there is not much support for young designers and young brands. It’s really hopeful when you see that a big group like LVMH is looking at what young designers are doing. It’s a good thing. It means you are not playing anymore. It’s serious. If Atto doesn’t win, we already won, just to be part of the designer group. It’s quite an eclectic group of finalists. And I’m so happy it’s going on in Paris, you know, finally.

There is something moving. My friends and I are super-happy that J.W. Anderson is coming to Loewe, that Nicolas Ghesquière is coming to Vuitton. You can feel a good energy now in Paris.

Photo: Patrick Demarchelier; InDigital Images 

Happy Birthday, Dear Outnet: Celebrating Five Years of Designer Deals

-------

“Coulda, woulda, shoulda.” Thanks to The Outnet, that phrase rarely leaves our lips—when it comes to shopping regrets, at least. The designer discount site operated by Net-a-Porter brings you the best pieces from seasons past, meaning not only can you snag those Alexander Wang shoes you sorely missed out on, but you can get them for a bargain, too. To celebrate its fifth birthday, The Outnet is reissuing some of its top designers’ greatest hits—think Alexander McQueen’s patent bow clutch, J.W. Anderson’s paisley top, and Roland Mouret’s iconic wool dress. It also put together an adorable video, above, debuting exclusively here on Style.com. Chic shoppers like Alexandra Richards, Leigh Lezark, Garance Doré, Leandra Medine (who just filmed her own video series for Style.com), and Harley Viera-Newton discuss their favorite pieces while grooving to our new favorite jam, “Love Letters” by Metronomy. “Balmain for me is the Parisian brand,” Doré insists. As for Viera-Newton, “Oscar de la Renta is the dream” and Jason Wu is for “the confident, strong woman.” If you want to look “adorable,” Lezark suggests Preen by Thornton Bregazzi’s pastel pencil skirt. We’ll take it from the experts. The full collection will be available only at TheOutnet.com starting April 29—killer dance moves not included.