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April 19 2014

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59 posts tagged "J.W. Anderson"

Charlotte Stockdale Talks Exploring Fashion and Her Gig at Garage

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Garage

Last October, British stylist Charlotte Stockdale announced she was leaving her post at i-D, a pillar of British street and underground fashion, and joining Garage magazine as its fashion director. The über-cool stylist’s first efforts for Dasha Zhukova’s biannual art and fashion mag were unveiled today, when issue six hit newsstands. Garage gave us an exclusive first look at its Nick Knight-lensed covers (above), which feature Karlie Kloss and Cara Delevingne. As evidenced by Garage‘s new snaps, Stockdale can seamlessly transition between high-gloss and grit—a skill that no doubt came in handy during her stints at Dazed & Confused and Harper’s Bazaar, and while styling shows for the likes of Dolce & Gabbana and Fendi. She’s worked with Karl Lagerfeld on the latter’s runway looks and campaigns for the last five years. Here, Style.com caught up with Stockdale to talk about the state of British fashion, leaving i-D, and her vision for Garage.

What drew you to Garage?
Everything about it. I remember the first issue coming out and thinking it was something different, courageous, seriously beautiful, and sometimes quite shocking. It’s not safe and it’s incredibly sophisticated. I talked on and off with Dasha about shooting for her, but it never worked because I was too busy with i-D. Then we met for tea after the summer—I was quite relaxed from holiday—and she said she was looking into a fashion director, and obviously that evolved into a conversation.

Did you feel that i-D was no longer those things—courageous, shocking, and beautiful? Is that why you left?
No, that’s not why I left. Not in the slightest. I enjoy conceptual fashion, and there isn’t a lot of space left for it anymore. Garage is a venue where conceptual fashion is still the right thing. When I started at Dazed & Confused at the beginning, conceptual fashion was the thing. I like exploring it on multilayers, not just mixing jackets and trousers for a good picture.

And how does that translate in terms of your vision for this magazine?
I would like to keep a delicate mix of sophisticated and playful. Humor is very important, but it can’t be silly, and beauty is really important. The art content is serious. I don’t mean serious in a way that it is not amusing. Some of it is very amusing, but they put in heavyweights. The fashion needs to balance that out. I love working with the stylish photographers and new photographers and new designers. So far, most of them are saying “yes.”

On the subject of new designers, who are you particularly excited about right now in London?
It sounds awfully predictable to say, but I am very interested in J.W. Anderson and Christopher Kane. London right now has finally hit its stride. There’s Peter Pilotto, Mary Katrantzou, etc., and they have all found this balance between creativity and the business, which are equally important. That wasn’t so much the case when I was young. Some succeeded and others didn’t—the balance wasn’t correct. I have seen so much talent leave Britain and move to other cities. We have always felt it was such a shame that these kids aren’t back at home building proper brands themselves.

How do you think this momentum with London fashion will progress in the next few seasons?
I think the momentum will continue. With Natalie Massenet at the helm of British Fashion Council, everything has stepped up a few notches. Obviously, she is a lady of no fear. These young designers all have solid bases, and they are building proper businesses. The month is a very crowded month, and it is pretty challenging for [fashion] people like ourselves. London used to be a three-day thing and you could miss it. Now it’s a solid five-day event full of high-class content. It is the most interesting fashion week aside from Paris.

Photos: Nick Knight

The Split-Second Preview: J.W. Anderson

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The Fall ’14 menswear collections kicked off in London today, and will be followed by the shows at Florence’s Pitti Uomo, in Milan, and in Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length previews at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Fall ’14 previews is available here.

J.W. Anderson Fall '14 preview

WHO: J.W. Anderson, designed by Jonathan Anderson

WHERE: London

WHEN: Tuesday, January 7

WHAT: “Aristocratic biscuits.” —Jonathan Anderson. The designer sent us a sneak peek of his Fall ’14 show space, above.

Photo: Courtesy of J.W. Anderson

World of Interiors: Dover Street Market New York’s Designers on the Spaces They Designed for the New York Megastore

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The many different edifices—many designed by Rei Kawakubo—of Dover Street Market New YorkTomorrow, Dover Street Market in New York opens its doors to the public (including that very committed member of the public who has been camped out in a pup tent on the corner, reportedly for days, waiting). The multibrand store, owned by Comme des Garçons, stocks both the full range of Comme des Garçons labels (which are many), and lines that Rei Kawakubo and her team select and buy for the store—with the sphinx-like Kawakubo often doing the buys herself.

The concept of shop-in-shops at multibrand retailers is nothing new, and many department stores have concessions piloted by individual designers and labels. But few give so much freedom to so many as Dover Street Market. (“We don’t go in for brainstorming,” CdG CEO Adrian Joffe put it dryly to Style.com last year) The result is that walking through the seven stories of New York’s Dover Street Market—or riding up in the glass elevator that was commissioned for the space—is a varied, eye-popping, and often surreal experience. Brands are grouped together in unlikely arrangements, decided by Kawakubo. On the seventh floor, Prada sits next to the skate brand Supreme, the Japanese line Visvim, and near André Walker, the cult designer coaxed out of semi-retirement to design a new collection for the store. And because most if not all of the labels are given license to design their own spaces and fixtures, going from one to the next, even over a distance of only a few feet, can feel like traveling between dimensions or falling down the proverbial rabbit hole. (This is not even to take into account the stairway, designed by the architects Arakawa and Gins, which somewhat resembles a birth canal and is reputed, according to a Comme representative, “to reverse your destiny.”) And this is before you account for the artworks commissioned from the space, including three artist-designed pillars that evolve as they cut through the seven floors, a sound art installation, a mural and more.

The result is a store that is completely unlike all of the existing shopping experiences in New York. But for every person disoriented by the experience, there is likely to be another delighted by the creative chaos. “It’s not overthought. I feel sometime shopping environments can be overcalculated—it’s nearly forced, duty-free luxury,” said Jonathan Anderson, who created the first branded space he’s ever done in the history of his J.W. Anderson label for the store. “I don’t think luxury has to be determined in that way. I think luxury is about the arrangement of ideas, not necessarily the finish.”

Style.com spoke with several designers who created their own spaces—and in many cases, exclusive product—for Dover Street Market New York.

Dover Street Market New York opens tomorrow at 160 Lexington Avenue, NYC.

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's space at Dover Street Market New YorkAnderson, the London-based designer who was recently named creative director of Loewe, was inspired to build his space out of children’s foam-rubber play blocks, all in a shade somewhere between sky and Yves Klein blue. He’d seen children playing with them in a park in Venice, where he’d just returned from his first vacation in seven years when Joffe asked him to do a space on DSMNY’s fifth floor. “They’re from America, weirdly,” he said. “The company did them exclusively in different shapes for us. It was quite fun, actually.”

Dover Street has been a longtime patron of Anderson’s collections, which are also stocked in its London and Ginza, Tokyo, stores. Kawakubo herself selects the pieces to carry which often, thanks to her off-kilter eye, end up being exclusive to DSM. “I always like watching her edit. I love her commitment to fashion, buying from other brands. You have to be on a very different plane to able to do that,” he said. “I think that’s what’s so exciting about the relationship between Dover Street and Comme des Garçons. I think it’s such an interesting exercise, and that’s why there’s no compromise in the buy, there’s no compromise in the store shopping experience.”

Supreme

The Supreme space at Dover Street Market New York

“Supreme is a hard brand for people to categorize,” said founder James Jebbia. “DSM does a great job at taking the best brands in the world and mixing them in their store without categorizing them.”

All that is to say, Dover Street let Supreme be Supreme: graphic, in your face and immediate. Jebbia commissioned Weirdo Dave (né Dave Sandey, but also known as Fuck This Life) to create a large backdrop mural of found images, which has a Tumblr-ish spark. (A few yards away hangs Visvim’s cozy hanging quilts.) How much interaction did Kawakubo have with the space? “Not much, really,” Jebbia said. “Rei let us design the space how we wanted, but she looks at and approves every detail. If she didn’t like something, she certainly would have told us.”

Continue Reading “World of Interiors: Dover Street Market New York’s Designers on the Spaces They Designed for the New York Megastore” »

V Cubed It Is! Versus Versace Taps Anthony Vaccarello

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Anthony Vaccarello and Donatella VersaceBack in September, a rumor broke out that Anthony Vaccarello, the hot emerging Belgian talent known for his daring, slit-up-to-here wares, might be the next Versus Versace collaborator. And lo and behold, it’s turned out to be true. Versace announced today that the collection, which will no doubt be a slick, saucy offering, is set to debut in 2014. Vaccarello succeeds Christopher Kane, J.W. Anderson , and M.I.A., all of whom have collaborated with the brand.

Photo: Filippo Fior/ InDigital/ GoRunway

NEWGEN Announces Its Fall ’14 Recipients

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Simone Rocha Spring '14This morning, NEWGEN, the British Fashion Council’s Topshop-sponsored emerging talent scheme, announced the seven new talents who will receive sponsorship to present their Fall ’14 collections during London fashion week in February. Fledgling designers and brands including 1205, Marques’Almeida, Lucas Nascimento and Simone Rocha (left) will receive support for their runway shows while designer Ryan Lo, a Fashion East alum, will receive funding for a presentation. Meanwhile, Claire Barrow (another Fashion East grad) and Danielle Romeril will house their new collections in an exhibition space. The NEWGEN committee, chaired by journalist Sarah Mower, MBE, selects designers based on their creative strengths and distinct points of view. Past awardees have included Alexander McQueen, Christopher Kane, Mary Katrantzou, Nicholas Kirkwood, Jonathan Saunders, and J.W. Anderson.

Photos: Courtesy Photos/div>
Photo: Marcus Tondo/ Indigitalimages.com