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August 30 2014

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64 posts tagged "J.W. Anderson"

Jeffrey Kalinsky Cares a Whole Lot

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Jeffrey KalinskyJeffrey Kalinsky cares. One need only look to his annual charity events in New York and Atlanta—which, aptly dubbed Jeffrey Fashion Cares, raise money for HIV/AIDS and breast cancer research and LGBTQ organizations—to see that. But does fashion care? Considering the stereotype that the industry’s concerns never reach beyond silhouettes, vanity, and wow! factor (thank you, Prêt-à-Porter and Zoolander), we felt this was a pertinent question. “I think it does care,” answered Kalinsky. “I mean, Michael Kors recently made a $5 million donation to God’s Love We Deliver. Diane von Furstenberg does so much good work, as does Robert Duffy from Marc Jacobs,” he reasoned. “The list goes on. You’re never going to find a profession in which everybody cares. But yes, there are a lot of people in fashion who care.” Glad we could put that debate to rest.

Kalinsky, known for his Jeffrey boutiques in downtown Manhattan and Atlanta, launched his philanthropic gala twenty-two years ago in Georgia. In 2003, after opening his New York store on 14th Street, the retailer brought his charitable evening to the Big Apple. This year’s event, scheduled for Tuesday, April 8 at the 69th Regiment Armory (get your tickets here!), will donate 80 to 90 percent of the funds raised to the Hetrick-Martin Institute, Lambda Legal, ACRIA, and the Point Foundation.

While the 2014 Jeffrey Fashion Cares board includes such bold-faced names as Prabal Gurung and Mickey Boardman, the real star of the benefit is honoree Rob Smith, a tireless gay rights activist and fashion executive. “I feel it’s important for me to honor the real volunteers out there,” said Kalinsky of his choice to highlight Smith, who recently traveled to Russia with Athlete Alley (where he currently serves on the board) to help further LGBT efforts on the ground at the Olympic Games in Sochi. “There are a lot of ‘famous people’ out there who do a lot of good, but Rob is a guy who has worked so hard for charity just because.”

We should also mention that the evening will feature an enticing auction. A trip to Paris, Maggie Smith’s Downton Abbey choker, a Suno tunic, and an Alexander Wang handbag are just a few of the carefully considered items up for grabs. You can get a head start and bid now at GavelAndGrand.com.

The impressive selection of auction pieces shouldn’t be surprising, considering the top-notch mix of wares available in Kalinsky’s stores. His latest find? LVMH Prize finalist Simon Porte Jacquemus, whose brand Kalinsky picked up for Fall. “I loved it because it didn’t seem like it was looking back—it was looking forward,” offered Kalinsky, adding that he both stocks and admires newcomers like Simone Rocha, J.W. Anderson, and Yang Li. So what does it take for a newbie to catch the retailer’s eye? “I have to see the right blend of art and commerce,” he explained. “And I just know it when I see it. I can hear the cash registers ringing.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

Marco de Vincenzo Talks LVMH, Independence, and Commercial Success

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Marco de Vincenzo

Marco de Vincenzo: If you don’t know his name, you’d better learn it fast. The Italian up-and-comer, who has worked with Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Venturini Fendi on the Fendi collection since 2000, recently secured financial backing from LVMH. LVMH has proven to be a strong supporter of fashion’s new guard—what with the creation its Young Fashion Designer Prize as well as its investment in Nicholas Kirkwood and J.W. Anderson—and bought a minority stake of De Vincenzo’s eponymous brand last month. Ever quick to the draw, Moda Operandi’s Indre Rockefeller has already scooped up the designer’s tactile, kaleidoscopic Fall ’14, and is offering it for pre-sale via an online trunk show, which runs through March 20. “I think he is an innovator,” Rockefeller told Style.com. “There are a number of designers who are doing beautiful things, but whenever I see Marco’s collections, it feels like he’s marching to the beat of his own drum,” she explained. “When you look at his use of color, texture, and print, it almost feels like he’s operating in another dimension. His Fall collection popped right off the runway, and for our purposes, it will pop right off the page as well.” That’s some high praise from a major retailer. “This was a very special season for me,” relayed De Vincenzo, who describes his woman as daring, classical, and hypnotic. “The timetable for a trunk show of this level is perfect because it’s so close to the show—the energy is still there,” he said of the Moda Operandi event. Here, De Vincenzo speaks with Style.com about LVMH, working with Silvia and Karl, and his plans for the future.

How has your role at Fendi influenced your design aesthetic? And what have you learned from Silvia and Karl?

When I started working at Fendi, I was a young boy. I owe all I know about this job to the opportunity I’ve had to observe and work with those two very important people—Silvia and Karl. I learned what it means to be free and to constantly want to reach my own goals and to create new ones. Working on bags together with Silvia gave me the opportunity to completely understand the balance that transforms a beautiful object into a big commercial success. I consider myself very lucky to have built my knowledge in such a context.

Did your role as a consultant at Fendi help facilitate LVMH’s investment in your brand?

Of course. Through Fendi, LVMH has had the time and opportunity to get to know me both as a creative and as a person. I love my job more than anything, and because of that, I dedicate most of my time to it. I believe that this dedication has been understood and appreciated.

Why did you feel it was the right move to sell a minority stake of your business to LVMH?

Being an independent designer is not easy. You can be noticed and arouse interest in people, but there’s a moment when you can’t satisfy what the fashion industry expects from season to season by yourself. You need to create and experiment, and you need money to do so. Furthermore, if you don’t have enough resources and a good team working with you, it’s hard to guarantee high quality concerning production and distribution. LVMH is giving me the possibility to grow.

Marco de Vincenzo

We’ve seen big fashion companies investing in several emerging and independent designers in the last couple of years. What are your thoughts on this? And how do you think it will affect the fashion industry and help it evolve?

I think that all this can facilitate a real generational turnover—not only via hiring talented designers to reshape established brands, but also by helping new names. It’s very natural to invest in the future of fashion because nothing lasts forever, and innovation is essential in every creative field.

What are your plans now that LVMH has invested?

From now on the game will become more serious. This does not mean that my last years of work were a game, but it’s true that more resources, together with a strong, pure, and creative vision, can make miracles. My business is becoming more definite.

Can you tell us about your aesthetic? What excites and inspires you?

I leave instinct to guide me without any limits. My aesthetic varies—it’s a harmony between very different themes. Optical illusions, kinetic art, and visual and tactile 3-D concepts are some of my starting points, together with the idea of being well dressed, and typically Italian.

What would you like to see change in the fashion industry?

Unfortunately, I know a lot of very talented designers who had to give up their projects because they were alone and were not accepted by the fashion industry. This must be avoided. A substantial project always needs a group of different [supporters and creatives] to be built. In my opinion, it’s very important to have a good team working together.

Photo: Getty Images; Courtesy of Moda Operandi

Ten Looks, One Show: The Industry’s Top Stylists Honor the Albright Fashion Library

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FIT x MAC Fashion Library

It’s been over ten years since Irene Albright first opened the doors to the Albright Fashion Library—the more than 15,000-dress-, 7,000 shoe-strong collection of contemporary couture, ready-to-wear, and accessories now housed in a massive 7,000-square-foot loft at 62 Cooper Square. “Irene was working with KCD and saw that people were running around chasing clothes, and she just decided to start buying [important pieces],” recalled the Library’s creative director, Patricia Black. “Eventually, people would come to her saying, ‘Oh, do you still have that sweater? Can I borrow it?’”

Today, after a decade functioning as a sort of dream closet for fashion insiders, the Library is feting its history, as well as the incredible individuals who have pulled from its continually evolving archive, with Albright Goes to School, an exhibition in partnership with the Fashion Institute of Technology and MAC Cosmetics that opens this evening at the Museum at FIT.

“I wanted to celebrate Irene, the Library, the stylists—the people who were working on the inside—the shakers and tastemakers,” said Black. “Without them, we wouldn’t have what we have in terms of this colossal space just packed from floor to ceiling with clothes.”

FIT

The show—a first look debuts here—features individual looks that ten stylists (June Ambrose, Paul Cavaco, Catherine George, Tom Broecker, Freddie Leiba, Lori Goldstein, Kathryn Neale, Mary Alice Stephenson, Kate Young, and Patti Wilson) created using iconic wares from the Library. A Tom Ford goat hair jacket layers over a Comme des Garçons tank in Goldstien’s look; Balmain is mixed with Givenchy and the artist’s own choker and face mask in Leiba’s; and Patti Wilson utilizes a Lanvin body harness to sex up an otherwise high glamour Yves Saint Laurent and J.W. Anderson combo.

There’s a rich history to the institution, and Black, Museum at FIT director and chief curator Valerie Steele, and set designer Stefan Beckman were tasked with expressing that through a tight narrative. “There are some incredible stylists who pulled these outfits, but they each have their own different story,” related Beckman, who described the installation as a “gritty fire escape urban idea.”

Steele added that the Museum’s interest in the exhibition stemmed, in part, from a desire to champion stylists. “People tend to think, Oh, designers make fashion. So it was important to be able to bring in stylists and show that they also have a really important role in putting looks together.”

The ten ensembles will be on display through March 31. The show marks the beginning of a greater collaboration between FIT and the Albright Fashion Library. “Irene is such an eclectic collector of everything from fashion to art to houses to people. So who knows what she’s going to start collecting next and where we’re going to take that,” suggested Black. “[But] I’m excited about the beginnings of seeing how we get to work and inspire the new generation of kids who dream of becoming the next designer, visual director, creative director, fashion editor, stylist, or costume designer. I’m hoping that we can lend a little bit of light to them in this moment.”

Photo:  
Photos: George Chinsee  

Tom Greyhound Lands in Paris

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Tom Greyhound

Hyundai may be best known as a South Korean car manufacturer, but it also dabbles in fashion through a division called Handsome. During the Paris collections, Handsome jumped into the City of Light’s shopping scene by opening a Marais outpost of Tom Greyhound, its multibrand concept store. (Check out the Seoul outpost here.)

Tom Greyhound. The name sounds like a cartoon character, and the store’s not-so-vaguely Batman-esque design reinforces that impression. One spin through the racks, however, and everything snaps into focus. A savvy mix of emerging and international talent—including Rag & Bone, Peter Pilotto, 3.1 Phillip Lim, J.W. Anderson, Christopher Kane, Thakoon, Opening Ceremony, and A.F. Vandevorst, among others—comes arranged by theme, not by brand, and the cozy, loft-style layout is sure to please men and women trying to track down labels that, until now, have been hard to find in Paris.

Tom Greyhound is located at 19 Rue de Saintonge, Paris, 75003.

A Midway Fall ’14 Model Report

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Ola Rudnicka and Imaan Hammam

We’ve just passed the midway point of fashion month with the Milan shows well under way, and there have been plenty of memorable modeling moments thus far, particularly for newcomers. In general, the top-tier, A-list catwalkers have been more selective with their schedules, leaving room for fresh faces to ascend the ranks. Perhaps the easiest way to break down our favorite rookies is by hair color. By and large, it’s been the season of the platinum blond, with familiar faces Julia Nobis, Ashleigh Good, Juliana Schurig, Sasha Luss, and Devon Windsor making a strong case for bleached tresses (reminiscent of Khaleesi from Game of Thrones). Several new models have been riding Fall’s peroxide wave, too. First is ethereal Polish beauty Ola Rudnicka, who debuted at Prada’s Spring show and landed a spot in the label’s latest campaign. She’s turned up on just about every major runway in each city so far. Rudnicka kicked things off on a high note in New York, walking Jason Wu, Michael Kors, Proenza Schouler, and Marc Jacobs. She went on to do Burberry and Christopher Kane in London, and continued to take Milan by storm, bookending No. 21 on Tuesday in addition to walking Max Mara and Moschino yesterday. Another noteworthy newcomer rocking a flaxen mane is Harleth Kuusik (who currently stars in Proenza Schouler’s Spring ads). In New York, she did turns at Rag & Bone, Victoria Beckham, and Proenza Schouler, then followed those up with J.W. Anderson and Erdem in London. We plan to see a lot more of both Rudnicka and Kuusik next week.

Waleska Gorczevski and Sophie Touchet

Next up is the fiery-tressed group of redheads led by sophomores such as Lera Tribel and Nika Cole (who can forget her teased-out, lamp-shade ’do from Schiaparelli’s Couture show?). They are joined by Quebec native Sophie Touchet, who made an early impact at Thakoon, 3.1 Phillip Lim, MBMJ (a.k.a. Marc by Marc Jacobs), and Burberry Prorsum, then moved on to open Alberta Ferretti and walk in Fendi yesterday. Finally, we’ve got a mixed bag of brunettes, ranging from Dutch stunner Imaan Hammam (she won the genetic lottery with a Moroccan mother and a father from Egypt, and her exotic looks have helped earn her key spots in top-tier casts including Prada, Proenza Schouler, Narciso Rodriguez, and Fendi) to fierce-looking Ronja Furrer (that strong jawline gave her an edge at Altuzarra, Alexander Wang, Christopher Kane, and more). And how about this season’s most buzzed-about newcomer? Waleska Gorczevski has a hell of a name and a hell of a presence. During NYFW, the Brazilian model was the first girl out at Marc Jacobs. She also opened Yigal Azrouël and bookended Victoria Beckham, and has continued to rack up an impressive show list including Calvin Klein Collection, Hugo Boss, Proenza Schouler, Christopher Kane, and Fendi. No doubt Paris will take to her serene, slightly quirky appeal.

Aside from Fall’s freshman class of catwalkers, we’ve witnessed plenty of noteworthy cameos by old-school veterans, too. For example, Alexander Wang’s finale featured the likes of Angela Lindvall, Bridget Hall, Candice Swanepoel, Caroline Trentini, Anne V., Hilary Rhoda, and Jacquetta Wheeler. Meanwhile, Karen Elson has been going at full throttle this year, and she continued to dazzle at Tom Ford, Donna Karan, and Diane von Furstenberg. On the other hand, we’ve got Karolina Kurkova, who surprised us by opening Cushnie et Ochs and turning up at Christopher Kane (where she was easily the most experienced model in the lineup). Other highlights included: Kirsten Owen opening and closing Mary Katrantzou; Mini Anden at Proenza Schouler; Liberty Ross and Stella Tennant at Tom Ford; and the triple threat of Carolyn Murphy, Frankie Rayder, and Liisa Winkler at Michael Kors. Last but not least was the brilliant cast at Burberry Prorsum, which featured Edie Campbell in addition to her two younger sisters, Olympia and Jean. Mark our words, those Campbell girls are stars in the making. And speaking of stars, you can’t deny that Kendall Jenner was a total natural on the runways at Marc Jacobs and Giles.

Photos: Indigitalimages.com