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April 21 2014

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262 posts tagged "Karl Lagerfeld"

Space: Fashion’s Final Frontier

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Fendi Fall 2014 RTWTo infinity and beyond! The new Fall collections found designers thinking intergalactically. Who could’ve guessed that we’d see Star Wars motifs at not one, but two shows? Rodarte’s Laura and Kate Mulleavy revisited their favorite childhood films with a buzzy finale of gowns featuring familiar characters like Luke Skywalker, C-3PO, and even Yoda. Just five days later, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi crossed over to the dark side with Darth Vader-printed looks and an entourage of stormtroopers who mingled with the models backstage. Others weren’t quite so literal with their outer space references. At Fendi, Karl Lagerfeld sent out a series of sheared fur coats and floaty silk velvet maxi dresses that resembled celestial charts. Elsewhere, Coach’s Stuart Vevers whipped up an Apollo sweater that echoed the one worn by Danny Torrance in The Shining. And Albert Kriemler, working closely with the German photographer Thomas Ruff, incorporated up close surface shots of Mars into several looks at Akris. Meanwhile, our award for the cleverest take on the cosmic trend goes to Undercover’s Jun Takahashi, who printed tiny UFOs on the borders of his Delft-china-patterned pieces.

Here, a slideshow of Fall’s spacey looks.

Marco de Vincenzo Talks LVMH, Independence, and Commercial Success

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Marco de Vincenzo

Marco de Vincenzo: If you don’t know his name, you’d better learn it fast. The Italian up-and-comer, who has worked with Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Venturini Fendi on the Fendi collection since 2000, recently secured financial backing from LVMH. LVMH has proven to be a strong supporter of fashion’s new guard—what with the creation its Young Fashion Designer Prize as well as its investment in Nicholas Kirkwood and J.W. Anderson—and bought a minority stake of De Vincenzo’s eponymous brand last month. Ever quick to the draw, Moda Operandi’s Indre Rockefeller has already scooped up the designer’s tactile, kaleidoscopic Fall ’14, and is offering it for pre-sale via an online trunk show, which runs through March 20. “I think he is an innovator,” Rockefeller told Style.com. “There are a number of designers who are doing beautiful things, but whenever I see Marco’s collections, it feels like he’s marching to the beat of his own drum,” she explained. “When you look at his use of color, texture, and print, it almost feels like he’s operating in another dimension. His Fall collection popped right off the runway, and for our purposes, it will pop right off the page as well.” That’s some high praise from a major retailer. “This was a very special season for me,” relayed De Vincenzo, who describes his woman as daring, classical, and hypnotic. “The timetable for a trunk show of this level is perfect because it’s so close to the show—the energy is still there,” he said of the Moda Operandi event. Here, De Vincenzo speaks with Style.com about LVMH, working with Silvia and Karl, and his plans for the future.

How has your role at Fendi influenced your design aesthetic? And what have you learned from Silvia and Karl?

When I started working at Fendi, I was a young boy. I owe all I know about this job to the opportunity I’ve had to observe and work with those two very important people—Silvia and Karl. I learned what it means to be free and to constantly want to reach my own goals and to create new ones. Working on bags together with Silvia gave me the opportunity to completely understand the balance that transforms a beautiful object into a big commercial success. I consider myself very lucky to have built my knowledge in such a context.

Did your role as a consultant at Fendi help facilitate LVMH’s investment in your brand?

Of course. Through Fendi, LVMH has had the time and opportunity to get to know me both as a creative and as a person. I love my job more than anything, and because of that, I dedicate most of my time to it. I believe that this dedication has been understood and appreciated.

Why did you feel it was the right move to sell a minority stake of your business to LVMH?

Being an independent designer is not easy. You can be noticed and arouse interest in people, but there’s a moment when you can’t satisfy what the fashion industry expects from season to season by yourself. You need to create and experiment, and you need money to do so. Furthermore, if you don’t have enough resources and a good team working with you, it’s hard to guarantee high quality concerning production and distribution. LVMH is giving me the possibility to grow.

Marco de Vincenzo

We’ve seen big fashion companies investing in several emerging and independent designers in the last couple of years. What are your thoughts on this? And how do you think it will affect the fashion industry and help it evolve?

I think that all this can facilitate a real generational turnover—not only via hiring talented designers to reshape established brands, but also by helping new names. It’s very natural to invest in the future of fashion because nothing lasts forever, and innovation is essential in every creative field.

What are your plans now that LVMH has invested?

From now on the game will become more serious. This does not mean that my last years of work were a game, but it’s true that more resources, together with a strong, pure, and creative vision, can make miracles. My business is becoming more definite.

Can you tell us about your aesthetic? What excites and inspires you?

I leave instinct to guide me without any limits. My aesthetic varies—it’s a harmony between very different themes. Optical illusions, kinetic art, and visual and tactile 3-D concepts are some of my starting points, together with the idea of being well dressed, and typically Italian.

What would you like to see change in the fashion industry?

Unfortunately, I know a lot of very talented designers who had to give up their projects because they were alone and were not accepted by the fashion industry. This must be avoided. A substantial project always needs a group of different [supporters and creatives] to be built. In my opinion, it’s very important to have a good team working together.

Photo: Getty Images; Courtesy of Moda Operandi

Insta-Gratification

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. See below for today’s top shots.

Thursday, March 13

Blurred lines need not apply.

Fact: Girls just wanna have fun.

And the award for coolest custom kicks goes to…

No one rocks classic red quite like Dita von Teese.

Coasting with Karen Elson. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification” »

Inès de la Fressange—French Aristocrat—Hits the High Street With Uniqlo

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Uniqlo

We love a high-low mix, but even we were (pleasantly) surprised by Uniqlo’s latest collaboration. The Telegraph reports that Inès de la Fressange—French aristocrat, former muse to Karl Lagerfeld, and universal purveyor of good taste—is taking her “democratic” sartorial approach to the high-street powerhouse.

In our opinion, the collaboration is actually a perfect fit. Last year De la Fressange wrote her best-selling fashion guide, Parisian Chic, to share her intuitive style with the masses. Now they can practically shop her closet. Every piece in the collection has an effortless, Left Bank vibe, like floral shirtdresses, wrap cardigans, and snug sweaters. “I have a way of wearing clothes, yes, but we are selling that,” she told the Telegraph. “Because some people hate shopping and hate fashion. With this collection everything can be mixed up for anyone.”

Inès de la Fressange for Uniqlo will be available in stores beginning March 20. For more information, visit uniqlo.co.uk.

Photo: via the Telegraph

Barrie: Time-Tested, Lagerfeld-Approved

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Barrie

The U.K.-based knitwear specialist Barrie has been quietly producing sumptuous cashmere for fashion’s top houses since 1905. But only since its acquisition by Chanel’s métiers d’art arm two years ago (remember that runway romp in a Scottish castle? Barrie had a little something to do with that) has the manufacturer begun a gentle transition into a stand-alone niche brand.

This week in Paris, we were offered an early glimpse of what’s to come via a Karl Lagerfeld-lensed lookbook featuring Lily Collins. Odile Massuger, who oversees knits for Chanel, proposes five themes and twenty silhouettes for winter. Key pieces include a bleu-blanc-rouge “romantic” camouflage cardigan, a soft pink delft theme, and bucolic landscapes. Scarves and fingerless mittens round out the offer. Those gloves and more will be available at Colette come June.

Photo: Karl Lagerfeld