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April 16 2014

styledotcom "It helps to have an understanding of what a garment is like on yourself so you can see it from a real perspective." stylem.ag/P5mPQZ

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63 posts tagged "Karlie Kloss"

Queen of the Catwalk: All About Style.com’s First Model Walk-Off Winner, Freja Beha Erichsen, and the Heated Competition

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Freja Beha ErichsenThe polls for Style.com’s first-ever Model Walk-Off officially closed this morning, and I personally couldn’t be happier with the result: None other than Freja Beha Erichsen claimed the championship title, beating out Chinese model Sui He with 66 percent of votes. It was a walk down memory lane going through our extensive archive of the Danish fashion icon’s runway career, which spans from her Fall 2005 Prada debut to her most recent, title-winning appearance at Louis Vuitton. Erichsen, who has been described as the “reigning queen of androgynous cool,” has scaled back her catwalk work significantly in recent years (to focus on more lucrative ad campaigns and edgy editorials), which made her victory here that much sweeter.

Still, there were plenty of twists and turns leading up to Erichsen’s final triumph. Voters and the Style.com team embarked upon a long and involved selection process, going through every single one of our video Move It clips from Fall ’14 to choose eight models from each city (representing a dynamic mix of established veterans and noteworthy newcomers from a range of backgrounds). The upsets began immediately once we turned the voting over to readers. In Round 1, for example, Estonian stunner Katlin Aas (an in-house favorite here at Style.com) knocked out well-known super Karolina Kurkova. And speaking of supermodels, the Paris bracket was particularly competitive from the get-go, with Gisele Bündchen trouncing Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, and Kendall Jenner coming from behind to beat girl of-the-moment Anna Ewers. Meanwhile, it was smooth sailing for Cara Delevingne, until she went up against Erichsen. On the other side of the bracket, we were flabbergasted to see Grace Mahary clobber Karlie Kloss (wearing that dramatic Donna Karan red dress, no less) in Round 2, and were on the edge of our seats watching the close race between Joan Smalls and Mariacarla Boscono.

All in all, the premiere Walk-Off left us with plenty to discuss and plenty to look forward to next season.

Photo: WWD 

Scads of Supermodels (and Harry Brant, too) on Day 3 of PFW

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Model Mania

We can always count on Paris for high-wattage casts, but we never expected to see so many supermodels this early in the week. None other than Gisele Bündchen kicked things off today by closing Balenciaga (the last time she set foot on a runway was Alexander Wang’s Fall ’12 show two years ago), where she was notably joined by familiar faces Mariacarla Boscono and Natasha Poly. Several hours later, Balmain continued to raise the bar with a lineup full of A-listers, including Angela Lindvall, Anja Rubik, Emily DiDonato, Izabel Goulart, and closer Rosie Huntington-Whiteley (who also walked in the label’s Spring show). Compared to those all-stars, the other major girls in the mix—Karlie Kloss, Joan Smalls, Jourdan Dunn, and Edie Campbell—all but faded into the background. And then leave it to Rick Owens to throw a wrench into the works. Following his step dancers last season, the designer turned heads again by interspersing old-school veterans such as Kirsten Owen and Diana Dondoe with real, mature women (many of whom, we’re happy to say, were not sample size). But this was no street-casting job. Rather, Owens’s casting directors, Angus Munro and Noah Shelley, told Style.com that “most of the ‘women’ were part of the Owens organization.” Owens kept it fresh by keeping it in the family. Speaking of keeping it in the family, we were pleasantly surprised to see Harry Brant follow supermodel mom Stephanie Seymour when he made his runway debut at IRFE. Sadly, his older brother, Peter Brant Jr., didn’t make the cut. There’s always next season, Peter.

Photos: IndigitalImages.com; Getty Images

Insta-Gratification: #NYFW Edition

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. For this very special edition of Insta-Gratification, she’ll be calling out the best shots from #NYFW. See below for today’s picks

Thursday, February 13

Marc’s models enjoying a moment off their feet.>br/>

Cloudy with a chance of Marc Jacobs.>br/>

Ralph’s pastel parade.

Lupita and Naomi pose with Francisco Costa backstage at Calvin Klein.

Wednesday, February 12

Scott’s caption is almost as good as the picture: “DOES RUNNING DOWN THE CATWALK COUNT AS EXERCISE? I HOPE SO!!! #DESIGNEREXERCISE”

Paid the cost to be the Boss.

Janice Alida giving us Mia Wallace vibes backstage at Anna Sui.

Charlotte’s post-Marchesa cornrows complete the video.

Peace, love, and bass. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification: #NYFW Edition” »

Charlotte Stockdale Talks Exploring Fashion and Her Gig at Garage

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Garage

Last October, British stylist Charlotte Stockdale announced she was leaving her post at i-D, a pillar of British street and underground fashion, and joining Garage magazine as its fashion director. The über-cool stylist’s first efforts for Dasha Zhukova’s biannual art and fashion mag were unveiled today, when issue six hit newsstands. Garage gave us an exclusive first look at its Nick Knight-lensed covers (above), which feature Karlie Kloss and Cara Delevingne. As evidenced by Garage‘s new snaps, Stockdale can seamlessly transition between high-gloss and grit—a skill that no doubt came in handy during her stints at Dazed & Confused and Harper’s Bazaar, and while styling shows for the likes of Dolce & Gabbana and Fendi. She’s worked with Karl Lagerfeld on the latter’s runway looks and campaigns for the last five years. Here, Style.com caught up with Stockdale to talk about the state of British fashion, leaving i-D, and her vision for Garage.

What drew you to Garage?
Everything about it. I remember the first issue coming out and thinking it was something different, courageous, seriously beautiful, and sometimes quite shocking. It’s not safe and it’s incredibly sophisticated. I talked on and off with Dasha about shooting for her, but it never worked because I was too busy with i-D. Then we met for tea after the summer—I was quite relaxed from holiday—and she said she was looking into a fashion director, and obviously that evolved into a conversation.

Did you feel that i-D was no longer those things—courageous, shocking, and beautiful? Is that why you left?
No, that’s not why I left. Not in the slightest. I enjoy conceptual fashion, and there isn’t a lot of space left for it anymore. Garage is a venue where conceptual fashion is still the right thing. When I started at Dazed & Confused at the beginning, conceptual fashion was the thing. I like exploring it on multilayers, not just mixing jackets and trousers for a good picture.

And how does that translate in terms of your vision for this magazine?
I would like to keep a delicate mix of sophisticated and playful. Humor is very important, but it can’t be silly, and beauty is really important. The art content is serious. I don’t mean serious in a way that it is not amusing. Some of it is very amusing, but they put in heavyweights. The fashion needs to balance that out. I love working with the stylish photographers and new photographers and new designers. So far, most of them are saying “yes.”

On the subject of new designers, who are you particularly excited about right now in London?
It sounds awfully predictable to say, but I am very interested in J.W. Anderson and Christopher Kane. London right now has finally hit its stride. There’s Peter Pilotto, Mary Katrantzou, etc., and they have all found this balance between creativity and the business, which are equally important. That wasn’t so much the case when I was young. Some succeeded and others didn’t—the balance wasn’t correct. I have seen so much talent leave Britain and move to other cities. We have always felt it was such a shame that these kids aren’t back at home building proper brands themselves.

How do you think this momentum with London fashion will progress in the next few seasons?
I think the momentum will continue. With Natalie Massenet at the helm of British Fashion Council, everything has stepped up a few notches. Obviously, she is a lady of no fear. These young designers all have solid bases, and they are building proper businesses. The month is a very crowded month, and it is pretty challenging for [fashion] people like ourselves. London used to be a three-day thing and you could miss it. Now it’s a solid five-day event full of high-class content. It is the most interesting fashion week aside from Paris.

Photos: Nick Knight

Frame Denim Finds Its Shirt

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Frame denim

Label: Frame Denim, designed by Jens Grede and Erik Torstensson

Need to know: Frame Denim cocreators Jens Grede and Erik Torstensson are on a first-name basis with their ideal wearer: Karlie (Kloss), Daria (Werbowy), and Lara (Stone). After all, the duo—the same creative masterminds behind Saturday Group—spend much of their time on set, directing said catwalkers. That is, confessed Torstensson, how Frame got started back in 2012. It was only natural that, surrounded by models, stylists, and editors, the two should design with these women in mind.

Debuting for Fall ’14 is the Frame Shirt, the all-new shirt category and next step in Frame’s goal of global fashion recognition. “We look at Frame through the eyes of a fashion brand rather than a denim brand,” Torstensson told Style.com. The all-black presentation marked the return of the label’s greatest distressed, coated, and vintage-wash hits. (No need to worry: The full range includes thoroughly modern skinny and high straight styles in gray, white, and navy.) But it’s the array of silk bombers, high-low tank tops, and tuxedo shirts that the pair expect to cause the biggest stir. And frankly, we agree.

They say: Pointing to a signature pair of slashed skinny jeans, Torstensson offered, “In the beginning, I thought it was too much. But a lot of really cool girls like it.”

Where to find it: Net-a-porter.com, Barneys New York, Revolve Clothing, Nordstrom, and shopbop.com.