Style.com
Subscribe to Style Magazine
8 posts tagged "Katie Hillier"

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

-------

Marc by Marc Jacobs

RODARTE
Breakfast with my colleague Maya to go over the lineup for the next issue of Style.com/Print, which we put together while simultaneously covering the shows on the site and publish within a month of the close of Paris fashion week, a live-broadcast approach to making a magazine. Then it was off to the Rodarte show. Last season’s collection got slated, though I sort of liked its trashy energy. This one had more of the Mulleavy sisters’ customary handcrafted offbeat charm and should be a hit with their fans. After that it was on to Diesel Black Gold on the West Side, and then a meeting on the East Side with a European luxury house, who filled me in on its plans for a huge event later this spring.

MBMJ
Tons of energy and lots of food for thought at Marc by Marc Jacobs, which has been rechristened by its initials and is now in the hands of the London-based duo of Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier. Something about the scale of the plywood set and the refracted references here made me think I could have been at a show in Paris. There was an intriguing magpie quality to the clothes, as if you were moving through the racks of Dover Street Market from the Japanese designer section to the sophisticated European section to the streetwear section. My favorite grouping was the BMX-inspired looks. The show was a bona fide smash with the audience. It’ll be interesting to see how the aesthetic, a break from the line’s more insouciant past, plays at retail. Delphine Arnault, of the parent group LVMH, was looking on from the front row.

ANDRE WALKER
Talking of Dover Street Market, I ran into the new Comme des Garçons-operated, multiretailer space on Lexington Avenue to say hello to Andre Walker. Walker is the first to describe himself as an “elusive” designer, and after a few stops and starts, he’s back with a small line, thanks to the encouragement of DSM’s Adrian Joffe and Rei Kawakubo. You’ll find it on the seventh floor between Junya Watanabe and Prada, an indication of the esteem Kawakubo has for Walker.

NARCISO RODRIGUEZ
Every season, there are a couple of models who break through and start popping up in all the big shows so that you can trace the day’s development through their changing hairstyles and runway attitudes. This season, those models are Binx Walton and Anna Ewers, who in the space of a few hours went from Bolshevik ninja at MBMJ to sleek gallerina at the serenely beautiful Narciso Rodriguez show that closed another day of New York fashion week.

Photo: Getty Images 

Marc Jacobs’ Name Changer

-------

marc jacobsThis morning, Marc Jacobs announced that he is changing the name of his popular diffusion line, Marc by Marc Jacobs. “I’ve always hated that name,” Jacobs told British Vogue. Of course, the new name has yet to be unveiled; Jacobs is “superstitious” and apparently wants to wait for the right time. Might that be on February 11 at Katie Hillier and Luella Bartley’s first Marc by Marc Jacobs show? We wouldn’t be surprised. The news coincides with Jacobs’ recent departure from Louis Vuitton to focus on his main line as well as the company’s forthcoming IPO.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com

Marc By Marc Taps Luella Bartley And Katie Hillier

-------

Luella BartleyLuella Bartley (left) has been missed since she shuttered her whimsical namesake label back in 2009 due to recession woes, so for us fashion folk, news of her comeback has stirred up a healthy dose of excitement. Today, WWD announced that Bartley and fellow Brit designer Katie Hillier have been appointed as the new design director and creative director, respectively, of Marc by Marc Jacobs‘ womenswear range. This marks the first time in the line’s fifteen-year-history that anyone other than Jacobs has been in the spotlight for a design role in the women’s collection. Hillier, who, according to reports, was tapped first and then brought Bartley on board, has worked with Marc by Marc on a freelance basis for the last ten years. Jacobs will continue to oversee the overall creative direction of the range, and the pair’s efforts will first be seen in the Fall 2014 collection.

Photo: Marcio Madeira

Louise Trotter Bags It for Joseph

-------

Joseph's New Bags

For Louise Trotter, creative director of Joseph, releasing a handbag collection was always a matter of “when,” not “if.” With a little technical help from accessories designer Katie Hillier, Trotter has now made her vision a reality. The bags, which hit stores on Monday, are composed of a single piece of bonded cowhide mixed with side panels made from butter-soft napa leather. Devoid of any visible stitching, each bag appears seamless and malleable. “When I design for Joseph, I always look at how much I can take off,” Trotter told Style.com.

 
Trotter’s focus has been on ready-to-wear since joining the London-based brand four years ago. And, with the exception of a playful zebra print and a few splashes of color, the bags mirror the tailored sensibility and neutral palette of Joseph’s Fall ’13 line. “The bags aren’t really a diversion, as much as an extension of what I’ve been working on [in ready-to-wear],” said Trotter.

 
The collection features totes, shoulder bags, clutches, and handbags, all in soft-edged square shapes. Retailing for between $265 and $1,695, there’s no doubt the bags will appeal to Joseph devotees seeking luxury essentials. As for her style of choice, Trotter opts for the shoulder bag, which she likes to wear as a clutch with the strap dangling down. “It’s how you carry it, and your attitude, that changes it from day to evening,” she said.

Photo: Courtesy of Joseph

London Parties For Fashion Week, With Dinner, Drinks, And A Few Well-Placed Torsos

-------

You don’t get to much shopping in the course of a busy day of London fashion-week shows. But last night, two of the city’s marquee boutiques found another way to welcome fashion weekers to town: Over in Chelsea, Joseph was hosting dinner at the store’s Joe’s Café, and back in the center of town, Browns had set up shop in the Royal Academy vaults to celebrate the store’s launch of Club Monaco in the U.K.

First, dinner. Joseph served up a nicely British repast of beet carpaccio and sea bream, one partaken of by Charles Anastase, Pat McGrath, Tamara Mellon, and Katie Hillier, as well as acclaimed chef and British-cuisine cheerleader Mark Hix. Meanwhile, over at Browns, where the likes of Tracey Emin and Sophia Hesketh could be found, Hix’s team of mixologists from his pop-up Speak Easy were treating guests to high-class cocktails, including a dangerous dark-cherry-flavored concoction. The spirit at Browns was a bit more Frenchified: The party’s host was Lou Doillon (left), and Le Baron’s André Saraiva had hopped the Channel to deejay. Or perhaps the mood was more transcontinental, what with Club Monaco being an American-owned brand, and the after-party going down at London’s recently opened outpost of the Box. Welcome to the global village.

Best to down another cherry cocktail, stop thinking about geography, and start looking at the art decorating the scene. The Royal Academy vaults had never before been opened to a private event, and the sculpture-strewn space may have been the real star of last night’s party. Vaguely creepy and seriously cool was the general verdict, and designer Saloni Lodha, who had presented her collection the previous day, was already making plans to relocate her show to the Royal Academy next season. “You think they’d let me do it?” she mused, staring up at a bank of muscular stone torsos hanging off one wall. “I mean, I don’t even know how Browns managed to pull this off. I didn’t even know this was down here!” As Doillon might have noted, après moi, le deluge.

Photo: Joe Schildhorn/BFAnyc.com