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April 21 2014

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4 posts tagged "Kenzo Takada"

Nipponista Lands in New York: Finally, a Pop-Up Store That’s Worth Visiting

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Nipponista Store

Come Thursday, Dover Street Market won’t be the only conceptual Japanese-centric retailer in town—Tokyo-based department store Isetan is bringing its Nipponista pop-up to Soho. “Isetan considers New York the hub of fashion in the business sense, and their ultimate goal is to open a permanent store,” said Kohsuke Miki, the creative director of the project. The weeklong pop-up is sponsored by both Isetan and the Japanese government’s Cool Japan initiative, through which the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry aims to promote Japanese products, craft, and technique abroad.

“For more than twenty years, there hasn’t been significant [Japanese] talent that actually surpasses the talent that existed before it,” Kohsuke said. “In the eighties there was Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto, and in the seventies there was Issey Miyake, Kansai Yamamoto, and Kenzo Takada.” Kohsuke believes that Nipponista, a cuter construct of the word Japanophile, is the right first step in establishing the new guard of Japanese creative talent and design.

Nipponista

Nipponista’s 2,000-square-foot space, which debuts exclusively here, features wares from some of the heritage brands Kohsuke mentioned—there’s a vintage Yohji Yamamoto ensemble, as well as choice pieces from Kansai Yamamoto’s latest collection (he revived his brand in 2013). But a coterie of designs from five emerging talents, who were commissioned to craft clothes in traditional Japanese indigo, or “Japanese blue,” is the centerpiece. Other fashion offerings include handmade sneakers from Hender Scheme, wearable embroidery from Maison des Perles, geometric jewelry from Shihara, delicate scarves from Suzusan, and garments from Anrealage and Yoko Chan, among others. Everything in the shop—even the giant window display of a teddy bear, which was constructed with hundreds of tiny balloons by artist duo Daisy Balloon—was made in Japan. Continue Reading “Nipponista Lands in New York: Finally, a Pop-Up Store That’s Worth Visiting” »

Augustin Teboul Takes Dorchester 2012

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Following the likes of recent Dorchester Collection Fashion Prize winners like Thomas Tait and Anndra Neen‘s Phoebe and Annette Stephens, designers Annelie Augustin (pictured, left) and Odély Teboul (pictured, right) of Paris-based label Augustin Teboul have been announced as the prestigious award’s 2012 winners. The duo’s all-black collection won over the judging panel, made up of designers like Kenzo Takada, Bruno Frisoni (pictured, center), and Nathalie Rykiel, last night at Hôtel Plaza Athénée in Paris. The two beat out rising labels such as Calla, IRM Design, Les Garçons Paris, and Quentin Veron for the $39,000 prize. “We are very moved,” Teboul told WWD. “At the moment, Annelie and I do everything ourselves.” If Tait and the Anndra Neen girls are any example, then that won’t be the case for Augustin Teboul much longer thanks to their new funds to amp up their studio staff. Watch this space.

Photo: Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

A Magazine And Acne Paper Play Host In Paris

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The party people were out in force on Friday night in Paris’ Marais to celebrate the latest editions of two—get this—print magazines. The revolving-editor A Magazine chose Giambattista Valli to helm its new issue: his chosen theme, “real beauty,” and his cover, a portrait of River Phoenix by Michael Tighe (above right). Marina Abramovic, Nan Goldin, Chiara Clemente, Lee Radziwill, Peter Schlesinger, and Kenzo Takada all collaborated on the tenth issue, as did Sasha Pivovarova, who did a series of self-portraits. “This magazine is about what nourishes me; it’s another way to show my inspirations,” said Valli, who opened his exploration with a 1975 quote from Yves Saint Laurent: “What we imagine may be very beautiful but nothing replaces reality.” (To buy, visit www.bruil.info.)

Around the corner at the very private Maison de La Chasse, Maria Berenson and editor Thomas Persson (below right) co-hosted a fête for the new issue of Acne Paper, the Studio Issue, and Kristin Scott Thomas and Bruno Frisoni (below left), Nicola Formichetti, Lanvin’s Lucas Ossendrijver and Elie Top, and Catherine Baba all dropped by to mill in the hunting house’s drawing rooms. The mag includes visits to, or representations of, the studios of artists like Matisse, Pollock, and Hockney, as well as photographic portfolios by Helmut Lang and Eric Boman. A nude Leigh Bowery (shot by Bruce Bernard as he sat for a portrait with Lucien Freud) appears on the cover (above left), and hostess Berenson is inside, shot by Katerina Jebb in Jean Cocteau’s house in Milly-La-Forêt. “Marisa’s grandmother, Elsa Schiaparelli, was so close to Cocteau it was natural to shoot her in his old house,” Persson explained of the spread, “and Acne is based on the idea of a creative collective, so we focused on artists’ studios as the place where creativity happens.” (To buy, visit Acne, 10 Greene St., NYC, or www.acnestudios.com.)

Photos: Courtesy of A Magazine; Courtesy of Acne Paper

Everything’s Coming Up Kenzo

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It’s been a banner year chez Kenzo. The Parisian label celebrated its 40th birthday in 2010, and while its legendary founder, Kenzo Takada, has retired from the helm (he now works on a home-goods collection), his successor, Antonio Marras, has kept the home fires burning. There was a gorgeous Spring show in Paris this October (“ludicrous[ly] beautiful,” Tim Blanks declared); a retrospective tribute takes place at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum today; and there’s a new coffee-table tome (Rizzoli, $75) dedicated to the history of the house. It’s lavishly illustrated with clippings from the archives, sketches from both Takada and Marras, ad campaigns, runway shots, and all the details you could want. Which, at Kenzo, would be a lot. The house’s signatures—wild prints, especially florals; folk-inspired layering; and billowing silhouettes—reward close inspection. And for just that reason, the book is full of foldouts, posters, and, smack-dab in the center, a large-scale pop-up like your kiddie books used to have (below). It’s a riot of flowers bursting into bloom, with the Eiffel Tower standing at the center, and the Japanese rising sun, in homage to Takada’s home country and the label’s spiritual home.

Photos: Courtesy of Rizzoli