Style.com

April 18 2014

styledotcom Bring me down, break it down in the hot, hot desert. This is where I wanna be. stylem.ag/1ner3oo pic.twitter.com/3y3WYV0Qau

Subscribe to Style Magazine
47 posts tagged "Kenzo"

Shop the Deep Blue Sea

-------

Shop the Sea

My daughter is definitely brainwashing me. Nearly everything in my house has something to do with a Disney princess. For a while it was all about Snow White, and now everything is about Ariel from The Little Mermaid. With the news breaking this week that Sofia Coppola is in talks to direct a new Little Mermaid film, I’m getting excited to see what kind of world Coppola will come up with, and who will play her red-haired sea maiden. I guess my daughter is one on-the-pulse 5-year-old. Here, a slideshow of ten items that will transport you under the sea.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Insta-Gratification: #PFW Edition

-------

In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. For this very special edition of Insta-Gratification, she’ll be calling out the best shots from #PFW. See below for today’s picks.

Wednesday, March 6

Model massage train.

Front row selfie realness with Lupita and RiRi.

A note from Nicolas.

What I love most about this picture is that Jared Leto took it.

Peace out, Paris. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification: #PFW Edition” »

Shop The Look: Block Party

-------

Shop the look

Spring may not be right around the corner, but we’re hoping our shopping habits will send out some warm weather vibes. Color blocking was all over the Spring ’14 runways, seen on whisper-thin layers at Theyskens’ Theory to splashy neoprene at Tommy Hilfiger, and we can’t wait to wear it this season. Clashing, ultra-bright hues feel sculptural on simple shapes, and there’s no denying the effortless, throw-on-and-go possibilities of a color block sweatshirt or skirt. Even if you opt for a subtler approach–say, blingy earrings or a pair of standout shoes–the result is undoubtedly fun. Shop our favorite color block pieces from Nicholas Kirkwood, Stella McCartney, Kenzo, and more, below.

1. Stella McCartney color-block cashmere sweater, $1,040, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Kenzo “Kalifornia” color-block leather clutch, $250, available at modaoperandi.com

3. Nicholas Kirkwood snakeskin, suede, and patent leather platform sandals, $955, available at modaoperandi.com

4. Dannijo “Cruz” earrings, $260, available at shopbop.com

5. Ostwald Helgason green and mint double-face skirt, $735, available at ssense.com

Photo: Courtesy photo

Fashion and Function: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim Talks Teaming Up With Intel

-------

Humberto Leon and Carol LimGoogle’s not the only company that can play the tech-meets-fashion game. Last night at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich announced the corporation’s new plan to produce functional tech accessories that are both wearable and aesthetically pleasing. Impossible? Not when you have Opening Ceremony’s Humberto Leon and Carol Lim on your team. The duo will design a smart bracelet, which, currently under development, will be unveiled at a yet-to-be-revealed date.

But one bracelet does not a revolution make, so in addition to OC, Intel has tapped Barneys (who will sell the forthcoming wristband and future products) and the CFDA (who will help emerging designers get on Intel’s wearable gadget bandwagon) to assist with the project.

Earlier today, Ayse Ildeniz, Intel’s VP of Business Development and Strategy of New Devices, hosted a panel to discuss the push. She was joined by OC’s Bettina Chin (Director of Special Projects) and Su Barber (Art Director), the CFDA’s Adam Roth (Director of Strategic Partnerships), and Barneys’ Matthew Woolsey (SVP of Digital). The takeaway from their chat? While functionality is key, the products have got to look great (if you recall, one of the biggest complaints about Google Glass, pairs of which were worn on Diane von Furstenberg’s Spring ’13 runway, was that it wasn’t exactly the sleekest thing on the block). “If wearables are to take off, it has to be an industry effort, and fashion and aesthetics have to be involved,” Ildeniz told Style.com after the panel. Woolsey concurred. “The design element is paramount to the way in which our customer engages with [the product],” he said. It’s worth noting that, through this project, Barneys will become the first luxury retailer to carry wearables.

So can Leon and Lim do for wearable tech what they did for Kenzo—that is to say, make it the cool set’s new must-have? Unfortunately, some blizzard-induced flight delays prevented Lim from attending the conference and addressing that in person. However, with a little help from a smartphone, Style.com was able to catch up with Lim about why OC and Intel are a natural fit, how she plans to make wearable tech covetable, and how her collaborative device will not only allow people to plug in, but offer them the option to turn off.

Why did you and Humberto say yes to the Intel project?
Technology in all forms has been really important to us, not only in our store and our collections, but also in terms of online retail. We had been watching the wearable technology space for quite some time before Intel approached us. We’d been thinking about how to incorporate [wearables] into our collection, so when this project came along, we thought it was a great opportunity. Intel represents such a strong force in technology, so we were happy to lend our design sensibility, and it makes sense to partner with someone whom we consider to be the expert.

Do you feel confident that the end result will resonate with the Opening Ceremony customer?
Absolutely. If you look at how people operate today, they use so many devices and applications. I think [wearable technology] is the next step in terms of how people interact. Your phone’s generally by your side, but you don’t always get a chance to look at it, so I think this product is a natural progression.

As far as stereotypes go, “fashion” people and “tech” people are about as opposite as you can get. How do you hope to bridge this perceived gap? And considering you design for Kenzo as well as Opening Ceremony, do you see wearable tech translating into luxury fashion?
When Intel approached us, they basically said, “We’re experts in technology, and we would rely on you to be experts in the field of creating an item that can stand on its own—an item that is beautiful, and that people will want.” I think that marriage of two partners with different talents is going to be very interesting. And you’re right, the fashion industry has been slow to adopt wearable technology. But I think that’s because it’s usually coming only from a technology point of view, rather than a combination of tech and design aesthetic. Our focus will be to create a covetable item that someone would want to wear regardless of the tech aspect. So I think this collaboration with Intel will stand out from other devices. Continue Reading “Fashion and Function: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim Talks Teaming Up With Intel” »

i-D Ups Its Online Game

-------

i-D

Last week, i-D rolled out its eye-popping new Web site, i-d.co. Having launched with a collaborative M.I.A. x Kenzo music video, the iconic magazine’s new online home will offer full-bleed imagery, quirky videos starring personalities such as Rick Owens, Lily McMenamy, Sky Ferreira, and more, and, soon, an interactive social-media component. The Web venture, which was feted at a veritable runway rave in New York last night, is a decidedly high-tech move for the publication, which, founded by Terry Jones in 1980, earned cult status because of its gritty fanzine approach to documenting London’s creative culture. Of course, it also helped that, early in their careers, photographers such as Nick Knight, Mario Testino, and Juergen Teller shot for the publication, and Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and even Madonna winked for its covers in their youth.

The site is thanks in part to Vice—the forward-thinking, in-your-face, Brooklyn-based media company that acquired i-D last December. “Vice’s whole push was to take i-D into the digital realm, which it wasn’t. We had a Web site, but it’s nothing like what we have now,” offered i-D editor Holly Shackleton. “Vice has been incredibly respectful. They haven’t been involved in our editorial choices,” she added. “They’ve just given us the digital know-how and business sense to start something new and launch the site.” More developments are on the horizon. i-D will soon open an office here in New York, and Jones, who’s been with the publication for the past thirty-three years, will take a notable step back. “He’ll always be on the masthead as founder,” offered Shackleton, stressing that while he’ll still be somewhat involved, he’s looking to spend more time with his family.

The Web site’s launch party in West Chelsea was a fitting display of fresh, edgy clothes and pioneering technology. In partnership with Samsung, the magazine flew over three of London’s hottest new talents—Ryan LO, Claire Barrow, and Ashley Williams (all Fashion East alums)—and had them present their collections in a holographic show. It was one-part IRL models (including Hanne Gaby Odiele), one-part virtual projections. Audience members (M.I.A. among them) could hardly tell who was real and who was simulated as the catwalkers danced amid computer-generated acid rain and floating gemstones. The crowd bounced and, at some points, fist-pumped to the EDM runway tunes. And even though partygoers were sipping champagne, the event exuded the underground cool that made i-D a force in the first place. “i-D has always been a global fashion community, and we hope the new site will encourage that,” said Shackleton. “We wanted to introduce these young British talents to a New York audience. They’re all future stars, without a doubt.”

Take a look at i-D‘s new online digs at www.i-d.vice.com.

Photo: Laura June Kirsch