Style.com

July 14 2014

styledotcom Our favorite poncho moments from fashion and pop culture: stylem.ag/U9mGPp pic.twitter.com/7j6QaD5DeL

Subscribe to Style Magazine
3 posts tagged "Kiki Smith"

Ladies & Gents, Unsexed

-------

The concept of blurred gender lines isn’t anything new. But it’s been at the front of our minds over the last few months, after seeing gaggles of girls dressed like boys (Saskia de Brauw in Saint Laurent’s Spring menswear campaign, Tamy Glauser, Jenny Shimizu, and Ashleigh Good on Givenchy’s Fall ’13 men’s runway) and boys dressed like girls (thank you, J.W. Anderson and Meadham Kirchhoff ). The art world seems to be pondering the topic, too. Evidence? Last night’s opening of Ladies & Gents—an exhibition at Salomon Contemporary that aims to cheekily explore our perception of the sexes. Featuring sixteen works, like Kiki Smith’s Daisy Chain (a long metal chain with a woman’s head and feet, made in 1992), Deborah Kass’ Four Barbras, Six Red Barbras, Four Barbras (a 1993 Barbra Streisand-centric silk-screen series), and Judith Hudson’s Bribe (an irreverent 2009 watercolor of a topless, pearl-adorned woman), the show lightheartedly juxtaposes masculinity and femininity, and sometimes fuses both. Take, for instance, E.V. Day’s work Spidey / Striptease (2012). Known for deconstructing fashion items (like a Chanel jacket, an Hervé Léger bandage dress, and pink panties) and stringing them up into complicated webs, Day presented a piece that combined a shredded Spider-Man costume, fishnets, and red stiletto heels. “I love Spider-Man, because his web looks just like a fishnet stocking,” said Day. “And that brought me to the realization that there’s a feminine idea about him,” she added.

Nir Hod—who showed Genius, a new painting that depicts a jaded, judgmental child wearing what looks like Elizabethan clothes while he smokes a cigarette—insisted that his work is about pure beauty. “That’s beyond gender. If you asked me if this was a boy or a girl, I couldn’t even tell you.” Continue Reading “Ladies & Gents, Unsexed” »

If I Had A Hammer…

-------

It seemed a simple enough concept: To rebuild following its devastating earthquake, Haiti needed cash and tools. So that’s exactly what Tools For Thought founders Diana Campbell and Julie Ragolia set out to find. Campbell, a museum administrator, and Ragolia, a fashion stylist with an art background, canvassed their friends and colleagues to gather tools. Of course, when your friends and colleagues are Nate Lowman, Dan Colen, Alex Katz, and Ed Ruscha, they’re swinging a different sort of hammer than the one that repairs the hospital. No matter. The hammer—the one is question Ruscha’s, by the way, a mallet for pounding canvas stretchers—is going on the auction block, along with the tools and work of more than 100 other artists, to raise money for Partners in Health’s Haiti efforts. Kon Trubkovich, Alex Katz (whose paintbrush is above), Subversive’s Justin Giunta, Marilyn Minter, Kiki Smith, and Patti Smith have all donated work to Monday night’s auction, where Smith (Patti, not Kiki) will perform and Alexandra Richards will spin. Attendees are encouraged to bring a mighty tool of their own—the checkbook.

Tools for Thought’s Rebuild Haiti cocktail reception and silent auction take place Monday, March 15, at Sotheby’s. For more information, visit www.ourtoolsforthought.org, or to purchase tickets, click here.

Photo: Courtesy of Tools For Thought

Chiara Clemente Has Now Lived Six Lives

-------

Chiara Clemente will happily volunteer that she’s spent much of her life in the shadow of her father, painter Francesco Clemente. But now the daughter is making her own light: This week, Chiara debuts her first feature film, Our City Dreams, at Manhattan’s Film Forum. A documentary exploring the experiences of five renowned female artists—Swoon, Ghada Amer, Kiki Smith, Marina Abramovic, and Nancy Spero—Our City Dreams is both a window on five eclectic lives and a group portrait of one kind of life, that of the New York artist. Closely observed, beautifully shot and scored, and often moving, Our City Dreams easily earns the acclaim it received on the festival circuit last year. But the feedback she most appreciates comes from her own artist pals. “People have told me that the film makes them feel good about what they do and inspires them to get back to it,” Clemente says. “I couldn’t ask for any better response.” Our City Dreams is at Film Forum through February 17; dates in other cities are soon to be announced. (Click here to see the trailer.) And later this year, the doc will air on the Sundance Channel. In the meantime, Clemente talks to Style.com about overcoming her allergy to New York, why it doesn’t have to be your birthday for the party to be a surprise, and how being a documentary filmmaker is like having split-personality disorder.

I’m going to ask why you chose to focus solely on female artists, but first, I’m wondering what made you decide to center Our City Dreams on artists in New York?

There’s sort of a long answer to that. I grew up in New York, and I think, when you grow up here, you either feel like you can never leave the city, or the second you can, you get out. I was one of those. When I was 18, I took off for L.A., and I really thought I’d never come back. It was like, see ya, bye. And after L.A. I went to Rome and was working there. Maybe three years into living in Rome I began to realize I had more New Yorker in me than I’d ever admitted to myself. So I came back. All told, I was gone about eight years. That may not seem like such a long time, but I left a child and I returned as an adult. I need to rediscover New York. And the easiest way to that, it seemed to me, was through a camera lens. What I mean is—I knew I wanted to create a portrait of New York before I knew anything else about this film. Because I’d been working with artists and filming artists in Italy, telling the city’s story through an artist’s eyes felt like the right thing.

Continue Reading “Chiara Clemente Has Now Lived Six Lives” »