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August 30 2014

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17 posts tagged "Kristen McMenamy"

Kristen McMenamy Through The Years

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As the self-proclaimed “first weird-looking model,” Kristen McMenamy has broken just about every rule there is during her thirty years (and counting) in fashion, which exactly is why we chose to profile her in the new issue of Style.com/Print. Throughout her career, the irreverent icon became renowned for her androgynous appeal, eccentric personality, madwoman-on-a-mission runway walk, and willingness to sacrifice life and limb in pursuit of the elusive perfect picture.

McMenamy was a fixture in the glossies during her nineties heyday (back then, her cropped hair, shaved eyebrows, unconventional features, and sinewy frame made her an ideal poster girl for the grunge movement); she has shot with the likes of Steven Meisel, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Juergen Teller, and Nick Knight, who took the pared-down portraits of her that run in Style.com/Print. Along the way, she has cultivated a support system of designers. “If fashion is her family, then Donatella Versace is her big sister,” writes Jo-Ann Furniss in her profile. That makes Karl Lagerfeld McMenamy’s proverbial father. Lagerfeld did, after all, walk her down the aisle at her ’99 wedding to photographer Miles Aldridge, in addition to casting her in a multitude of campaigns and runway shows.

See them all in our slideshow roundup of McMenamy’s career highlights >

Three’s A Trend: Dead Girls Walking

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Perhaps all those vampire films and zombie shows (The Walking Dead, anyone?) are finally taking their sartorial toll, because things are getting downright ghoulish on the Fall ’13 runways. It all started in London when Giles Deacon sent out models with white hair and morbid makeup in his Pre-Raphaelite gowns. Kristen McMenamy (above, center), who bookended the show in fluid black and white frocks, was particularly spectral as she glided down the catwalk, and Deacon’s location—the seventeenth-century Stationers’ Hall, which is just down the road from Saint Paul’s Cathedral—seemed ripe for haunting.

Set in a nineteenth-century hôtel particulier, Damir Doma’s Fall show (above, left) also had an underworld air. The models who donned his minimal black, gray and moss looks had powdered faces and eerie gold-shadowed eyes. Not surprisingly, however, the most macabre of them all was Gareth Pugh (above, right). The designer presented his architectural, largely black and white collection in Paris’ nineteenth-century Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild last night. (For an extra-creepy kick, he boarded up the windows to make the grand space look like some kind of decadent haunted house.) Pugh’s models, who had deathly pale faces and blackened eyes, roamed the runway with a disheveled unease. Was it spooky? Definitely. But the undead never looked so good.

Photos: Filippo Fior and Yannis Valmos / InDigital/ GoRunway

Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far

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With the London shows wrapping today, and editors and models jetting off to Milan, it’s time to reflect on the catwalking highlights from the past two weeks. More so than any in recent memory, this season has been dominated by fresh faces. Nearly every new girl on our top-ten list from Spring, like Marine Deleeuw, Irina Kravchenko, Manon Leloup, and Esther Heesch, had majorly successful sophomore outings. But the Fall shows have brought in an additional crop of noteworthy rookies in demand.

Let’s begin with the handful of former Balenciaga exclusives, whose takeoffs were all but inevitable. Sam Rollinson (above, top left), who starred in a Burberry ad back in 2010 and was handpicked by Nicolas Ghesquière last season, had a strong NYFW. (She opened Reed Krakoff and walked Jason Wu, Alexander Wang, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Narciso Rodriguez, among others.) With a hometown advantage, the British brunette—whose cheekbones could cut glass—kept it up across the pond, scoring spots at Christopher Kane, Jonathan Saunders, and Giles. Two other Balenciaga favorites—Kremi Otashliyska and Chiharu Okunugi (above, lower right)—are also becoming runway regulars. The former hit catwalks at 3.1 Phillip Lim, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Marc Jacobs, while the Japanese stunner took turns at Rag & Bone, Rodarte, and Marc Jacobs in New York, and Erdem and Giles in London.

Opening the Alexander Wang show is usually a surefire way to go straight to the top, but this season, the second girl out—Tess Hellfeuer (above, top right)—is getting all the buzz. The model finished New York by closing Marc Jacobs, then emerged as a clear favorite of Michelle Lee in London, where she opened Jonathan Saunders and walked in Christopher Kane. Mijo Mihaljcic has also been making all the right appearances in London. Her tomboy appeal landed her spots at Burberry Prorsum, Jonathan Saunders, and Richard Nicoll. Continue Reading “Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far” »

Fashion’s Figures: Then And Now

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What determines the feminine ideal? Mannequin—Le corps de la mode (“Model: The Body of Fashion”), the latest of Paris’ Musée Galliera’s off-site exhibitions, aims to find an answer. The show, which runs from February 16 through May 19, examines why trends like wasp waists, swan necks, or 5′ 11″ frames (à la Karlie Kloss) have driven women’s aesthetic aspirations since the first models replaced store mannequins in late-nineteenth-century Paris.

Curator Sylvie Lécallier sifted through fashion magazine illustrations, photographs, and videos to chart the jump from one fashionable body type to the next: the twenties knock-kneed flappers, the sixties childlike Courrèges girls “sans hips, waists, or breasts,” the eighties power women who were captured in Helmut Newton’s “Big Nudes,” and beyond. The show includes photos of the earliest It girls, like a series of Nelly Martyl, a star of Paris’ Opéra Comique in the 1910s. She was one of the first stars to be featured as a model in the era’s top fashion magazines. Also on display are iconic images like Corinne Day’s 1990 shot of a topless Kate Moss, Juergen Teller’s 1996 photo of a nude Kristen McMenamy (she has “Versace” painted on her chest inside a red heart), dark surreal works by Guy Bourdin, and more. Continue Reading “Fashion’s Figures: Then And Now” »

A Rosy New Outlook On Eveningwear

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Don’t wear pink. It’s one of fashion’s golden rules. Even those of us who grew up with a Barbie doll in each hand have written off the color as too froufrou or girly. We’ve always been anti-, until a recent spate of rosy dresses made us reconsider the hue. Pink became the unofficial shade of Miami Art Basel; Anouck Lepère and Dasha Zhukova were just two of the partygoers photographed in bubblegum-colored frocks last week. Softer blush tones have been turning up on red carpets, too. Elle Fanning looked like a princess at the British Independent Film Awards in an Oscar de la Renta confection, while Kristen McMenamy, who generally favors a more gothic (read: all black) look, made an argument for pink at a dinner for the new Valentino: Master of Couture exhibit.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW of Spring’s rosy wares.