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August 22 2014

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5 posts tagged "KTZ"

Emerging Talents Give Dover Street Market New York a New Beginning

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DSM

On Saturday, after a two-day closure, Dover Street Market New York, Rei Kawakubo’s seven-floor multibrand fashion wonderland open since last December, celebrated its inaugural “new beginning,” with just-arrived Fall ’14 merchandise and fresh shop-in-shops. Melitta Baumeister, whose career was catapulted when Rihanna wore her oversize black biker jacket in Paris back in March, and Hood by Air’s Shayne Oliver are two new additions to the store’s fourth-floor DSM Showroom, which is devoted to emerging designers. They join a roster that includes Craig Green, Jacquemus, Phoebe English, KTZ, 1205, Gosha Rubchinskiy, Proper Gang, Shaun Samson, and Sibling. We checked in with the new recruits and a quartet of the floor’s returning talents to talk about Kawakubo’s lasting influence, their new installations, and the “beautiful chaos” that is DSM.

Melitta

MELITTA BAUMEISTER
“The Comme des Garçons campaign collaboration with Cindy Sherman in 1994 stopped me in my tracks. I remember being completely blown away,” Baumeister recalls. “So I’m very happy to be with a group of creators [now] that have a mutual understanding on fashion, to be part of a showroom that believes in the importance of creating new experiences of how fashion can be consumed, in a world of beautiful chaos. To be in an environment where the brand is understood will no doubt give [me] the confidence to go further with bigger dreams.”

HOOD BY AIR (SHAYNE OLIVER)
“Going to the Comme des Garçons flagship for the first time here in New York changed my life, and molded my thought process on creating a fashion brand that is meant for you, and only you,” Oliver remembers. “The shopping experience at Dover Street Market is [likewise] unique and special. I think it really works well with the HBA concept and vibe. We want to make people feel immersed in our world, in the whole experience of the brand. [Our shop-in-shop] is a conversation with our customers outside of the traditional realm of fashion.”

Craig Green

CRAIG GREEN
“All the Dover Street Market stores have a totally stand-alone and unique way of working. The amazing and forever-changing interiors make for a dynamic and exciting space and experience,” Green says. “The main idea behind our new Fall ’14 space was to put the highly detailed, hand-painted pieces against the raw quality of untreated wooden structures. We used large hand-painted fabric rugs as hangings to demonstrate what the garments themselves have been cut from.

Phoebe

PHOEBE ENGLISH
“DSMNY is different to other stores as it’s not really just a store, it’s a destination and an environmental experience, which heightens, celebrates, and elevates the incredible stock they hold,” English says. “In many ways it’s also a mecca for young creatives justifying and contextualizing the work they’re making; [that's what] the London store was for me when I was studying at Central Saint Martins. We wanted this space to [feel] unexpected, sort of like a surprise or a bit of drama injected into a retail environment. The raw naturalism of the collapsed cliff face against the clothes hanging on the suspended rails—something beautiful and refined in a broken space. I [also] wanted it to represent the dialogue of material, which informs each collection. I worked with art director Philip Cooper. It was about balancing the ethos of how I work creatively with the reality of shopping.”

Lee RoachLEE ROACH

“The opportunity to completely change the space seasonally allows us to truly represent the season’s ideas and concepts,” Roach says. “Our Fall ’14 space remains minimal with the introduction of new square metal fixtures. We’ve introduced stand-alone, industrial two-arm rails to highlight the collection’s fabrication and construction, which remain fundamental. I would like people to touch and try on the clothes.”

SIBLING (SID BRYAN, JOE BATES, COZETTE MCCREERY)

“DSMNY feels like being in an interactive art space but without any of the pretense,” the Sibling trio says. “It’s been fantastic to see how artists and creatives interpret the Sibling vision each time. We loved collaborating with Uncommon Projects [on the leopard shelving and screen unit], Richard Woods [using the catwalk recolored version of his iconic wood print as wallpaper], and now with artist James Davison. We saw James’ work recently via the journalist Charlie Porter. He’d uploaded a video of James’ window display with moving parts and amazing color. It also felt like he’d had fun doing it. All of which is very much what Sibling is about, so we didn’t think twice about working with him and sent him catwalk pictures and a very relaxed brief. Relaxed because we always like collaborative works to come more from the artist.”

Photos: Courtesy Photos

EXCLUSIVE: VFiles Launches VFiles Sport Plus, a Collection by the Users, for the Users

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VFiles

In a world where new e-commerce sites are a dime a dozen, VFiles stands out. Its unique designer selection (think Hood by Air, Adidas x Rick Owens, Moschino, and KTZ), innovative social media platform, and active community have kept VFiles steadily on our radar, and the platform’s singular aesthetic has left its dedicated fan base begging for an original cut-and-sew VFiles clothing line. Well, ask and you shall receive. VFiles’ debut collection, dubbed VFiles Sport Plus, launches on Monday. An exclusive first look at the range debuts here.

The campaign is modeled by VFiles users; one simply had to tag a photo of themselves on the platform to be considered for the lookbook. “The collection is by us, for us,” said Julie Anne Quay, founder of VFiles. “We looked at what our members collect, what they share…So it really is a community-generated collection,” she explained. “I think that’s also something that’s never been done before. Like, what if Facebook had a collection? What would that look like?”

VFiles

VFiles Sport Plus is comprised of unisex motocross jerseys and shorts, French terry hoodies, slub-knit tees, body-con dresses, and more. The clothes have a distinctive sport-meets-street vibe and a contemporary price point (prices range from $75 to $300). “It’s all branded, and really fun, functional, and wearable. We think we’ll fit alongside the brands in our stores right now, which is really important to us,” Quay said. “Our community is very loyal to young designers and likes to wear things no one else has ever seen. So I think VFiles Sport Plus is something they will be really excited about.”

Quay tapped Erin Magee, head of production at Supreme and creative director at MadeMe, to head up the design process. “Erin knows how to execute. She’s able to take what we want to see and actually turn that into a garment,” Quay explained. “There’s a language to VFiles that you can’t really put words to. You just know it’s VFiles.”

The VFiles Sport Plus collection will be available on April 28 internationally and on vfiles.com.

Photo: Jason Rodgers 

Throwing Some Shade

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Spring's Wild Sunglasses

Is it us, or do sunglasses just keep getting freakier? Thanks to a bevy of designers this Spring ’14 season, it appears that statement making will soon trump solar protection—but for results this OTT, we’re willing to endure a bit of a glare.

In New York, Jeremy Scott offered cat-eyes striped in “We’re experiencing technical difficulties” color-blocks. Prabal Gurung put his own spin on vibrant cat-eye shades, trimming them with asymmetrical shapes. Over in London, Meadham Kirchhoff showed a gilded, bat-wing pair—part The Matrix, part baroque Transylvania. Meanwhile, the XL shields that hid models’ peepers at KTZ could very well double as ski goggles. Across the Channel were, perhaps, the cheekiest iterations of all: Jean-Charles de Castelbajac sent hilarious pursed-lip specs and frames shaped to read “Glamour” down his Paris runway. No doubt, the look-at-me street-style set will be optically satiated come spring.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com

Mask Force

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Masks from KTZ, Emporio Armani, and Umit Benan

Could Leonardo DiCaprio have been on to something when he wore that odd welder’s mask in Venice last month? We ask only because we’ve seen a whole batch of bizarro visages on the men’s Spring runways.

Etro closed its thematic, Mexican-inspired Spring show by sending out models in embellished Zoro masks. Emporio Armani (above, center), too, showed eye-shielding veneers that were, if you will, part OTT sunglasses and part 2020 masquerade ball.

Umit Benan harkened back to a Turkey (his home country) all but forgotten in its modern—and troubled—era. Tapping the famed Milanese opera house La Scala for help, Benan paired each of his looks with guises of actors from old Turkish cinema (above, right). The effect? Caustically comic.

And then there’s KTZ (above, left), the U.K.-based label spearheaded by Marjan Pejoski and Koji Maruyama. Their combination of hoods, eclectic prints (one of which resembled an old map), and medieval metallic masks seemed to suggest a fusion of Westeros and East London.

Photos: Marcus Tondo/ InDigital/ GoRunway (Emporio Armani and Umit Benan);  Courtesy of KTZ

Inside David Bowie’s “The Stars (Are Out Tonight)”

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Out of the mystic comes “The Stars (Are Out Tonight),” a new Bowie video. This one is a lot less oblique than the video that artist Tony Oursler made for “Where Are We Now?,” the first single from Bowie’s startling comeback album, and that’s mostly because director Floria Sigismondi’s natural genius with a twisted narrative (case in point: Marilyn Manson’s “The Beautiful People” promo) gels so well with what one imagines is Bowie’s own predilection for the cinematically perverse. “The Stars” sumptuously elevates the man and the myth to new heights.

This particular offering toys with the androgyny, the bravado, the decadence, the desire that turns an ordinary human being into a raving fan. It also has a strong contemporary-fashion quotient, appropriate given that Bowie was, in a way that the upcoming exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum will surely clarify, always inclined to the fashion experiment—from the early days of his Kansai jumpsuits to McQueen frock coats and Hedi Slimane suits.

Stylist Jerry Stafford was responsible for dressing the cast of five for the two-day shoot in L.A.: models Saskia de Brauw, Andrej Pejic, and Iselin Steiro, plus Bowie himself and his co-star Tilda Swinton, with whom Stafford has worked for fifteen years. Stafford is, like me, a child of Bowie, but he says there was no time on the set for fandom. “Everyone understood they were part of something special.” There was one moment when Stafford presented Bowie with a long coat, explaining to him it was by a designer named Rick Owens. “More Rick Wakeman than Rick Owens,” was the response, Wakeman being the wizard-coat-wearing keyboard king of Brit prog rock. “He played piano on ‘Life on Mars?,’ ” chimed in Stafford, the sole moment when he let himself indulge his know-every-last-detail trainspotter obsession. “And, indeed, on the whole of Hunky Dory,” Bowie said with a knowing smile. Continue Reading “Inside David Bowie’s “The Stars (Are Out Tonight)”” »