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April 24 2014

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3 posts tagged "KTZ"

Throwing Some Shade

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Spring's Wild Sunglasses

Is it us, or do sunglasses just keep getting freakier? Thanks to a bevy of designers this Spring ’14 season, it appears that statement making will soon trump solar protection—but for results this OTT, we’re willing to endure a bit of a glare.

In New York, Jeremy Scott offered cat-eyes striped in “We’re experiencing technical difficulties” color-blocks. Prabal Gurung put his own spin on vibrant cat-eye shades, trimming them with asymmetrical shapes. Over in London, Meadham Kirchhoff showed a gilded, bat-wing pair—part The Matrix, part baroque Transylvania. Meanwhile, the XL shields that hid models’ peepers at KTZ could very well double as ski goggles. Across the Channel were, perhaps, the cheekiest iterations of all: Jean-Charles de Castelbajac sent hilarious pursed-lip specs and frames shaped to read “Glamour” down his Paris runway. No doubt, the look-at-me street-style set will be optically satiated come spring.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com

Mask Force

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Masks from KTZ, Emporio Armani, and Umit Benan

Could Leonardo DiCaprio have been on to something when he wore that odd welder’s mask in Venice last month? We ask only because we’ve seen a whole batch of bizarro visages on the men’s Spring runways.

Etro closed its thematic, Mexican-inspired Spring show by sending out models in embellished Zoro masks. Emporio Armani (above, center), too, showed eye-shielding veneers that were, if you will, part OTT sunglasses and part 2020 masquerade ball.

Umit Benan harkened back to a Turkey (his home country) all but forgotten in its modern—and troubled—era. Tapping the famed Milanese opera house La Scala for help, Benan paired each of his looks with guises of actors from old Turkish cinema (above, right). The effect? Caustically comic.

And then there’s KTZ (above, left), the U.K.-based label spearheaded by Marjan Pejoski and Koji Maruyama. Their combination of hoods, eclectic prints (one of which resembled an old map), and medieval metallic masks seemed to suggest a fusion of Westeros and East London.

Photos: Marcus Tondo/ InDigital/ GoRunway (Emporio Armani and Umit Benan);  Courtesy of KTZ

Inside David Bowie’s “The Stars (Are Out Tonight)”

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Out of the mystic comes “The Stars (Are Out Tonight),” a new Bowie video. This one is a lot less oblique than the video that artist Tony Oursler made for “Where Are We Now?,” the first single from Bowie’s startling comeback album, and that’s mostly because director Floria Sigismondi’s natural genius with a twisted narrative (case in point: Marilyn Manson’s “The Beautiful People” promo) gels so well with what one imagines is Bowie’s own predilection for the cinematically perverse. “The Stars” sumptuously elevates the man and the myth to new heights.

This particular offering toys with the androgyny, the bravado, the decadence, the desire that turns an ordinary human being into a raving fan. It also has a strong contemporary-fashion quotient, appropriate given that Bowie was, in a way that the upcoming exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum will surely clarify, always inclined to the fashion experiment—from the early days of his Kansai jumpsuits to McQueen frock coats and Hedi Slimane suits.

Stylist Jerry Stafford was responsible for dressing the cast of five for the two-day shoot in L.A.: models Saskia de Brauw, Andrej Pejic, and Iselin Steiro, plus Bowie himself and his co-star Tilda Swinton, with whom Stafford has worked for fifteen years. Stafford is, like me, a child of Bowie, but he says there was no time on the set for fandom. “Everyone understood they were part of something special.” There was one moment when Stafford presented Bowie with a long coat, explaining to him it was by a designer named Rick Owens. “More Rick Wakeman than Rick Owens,” was the response, Wakeman being the wizard-coat-wearing keyboard king of Brit prog rock. “He played piano on ‘Life on Mars?,’ ” chimed in Stafford, the sole moment when he let himself indulge his know-every-last-detail trainspotter obsession. “And, indeed, on the whole of Hunky Dory,” Bowie said with a knowing smile. Continue Reading “Inside David Bowie’s “The Stars (Are Out Tonight)”” »