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July 31 2014

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9 posts tagged "Lake Bell"

Acne Paper‘s Leading Ladies

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Acne PaperThomas Persson, editor in chief of Acne Paper, has got the ladies on his mind—leading ladies, to be exact. That’s why the theme of Issue 15, out tomorrow is “The Actresses.” “We have been a bit against the grain from most magazines; we have a different point of view and don’t focus on celebrity as much. We are more intrigued by theater, movies, drama, etc., so I thought that would be something to focus on,” offered Persson of the new issue, which features Isabelle Huppert masquerading as Greta Garbo on its Andreas Larsson-lensed cover (left). “But it is such a big topic,” he added, “so we narrowed it down to just the actresses that have intrigued us over the years.”

That list includes Meryl Streep, Isabelle Adjani, Gena Rowlands, Diane Keaton, Julia Roberts, Anouk Aimée, Julianne Moore, and Michelle Pfeiffer (among others), many of whom are presented in a thirty-page photo portfolio by Brigitte Lacombe that comprises little-before-seen snaps from 1988 to 1999 that she pulled from her archive (below). We couldn’t help but notice that many of the ladies are of a “certain age.” “Maturity doesn’t scare me,” explained Persson. “Just the opposite: It points to the quality and longevity of their careers, and it is re-affirming to see that these legends are still getting major roles. Anyway, I like things mature—doesn’t matter if it’s wine, cheese, furniture, or people. It speaks to character.” Continue Reading “Acne Paper‘s Leading Ladies” »

Decked Out

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The lure of skate culture drew Jude Law, Sean Avery, and Scott Lipps to denim shop 3×1 on Mercer Street to celebrate photographer Ben Watts’ (pictured, left) new project last night. Admittedly, the presence of topless models may have helped. Watts photographed Lake Bell, Chanel Iman, Jessica Hart, Behati Prinsloo, and Elsa Hosk—several of whom turned out for last night’s party—and emblazoned their undressed frames on limited-edition skateboard decks. “I don’t skate,” he admitted. “Well, maybe in the eighties. But I’ve always liked the tie-in with skate culture and sunny weather. My aesthetic has always been very much about summer.”

The deck designs, Watts said, were no-brainers: “It doesn’t take much imagination. The pose is always a winner.” And even though she’s a Victoria’s Secret regular, Prinsloo confessed she still was surprised to see herself immortalized in quite this way on a skateboard. “I’m practically naked and on a skateboard,” the model said at the celebratory dinner at Soho’s Jack’s Wife Freda. “I don’t think that’s ever not weird.” (Weird or not, her work was for a good cause—all proceeds went to the charities of the models’ choosing.) Asked for any tips for aspiring models, she demurred. “I don’t know if there are any tips to being topless,” she said. “But it’s definitely about being comfortable with the photographer.”

Photos: David X. Prutting / BFAnyc.com

The Digital Reformation

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“I like to look cool but like I didn’t try too hard—that’s what I live for,” Zoë Kravitz told Style.com last night at the newer and bigger Reformation outpost in the Lower East Side. “I shop here just about everyday.”

What Kravitz was describing was the very aesthetic Reformation, a collection made from mostly vintage materials, has made its name on: cool and effortlessly chic. One glance at the hip crowd that had turned out for the evening celebrating the launch of TheReformation.com, including Lake Bell, Chrissie Miller, and Chelsea Leyland, reflected just that. Many of the guests were sporting Reformation’s latest collaboration, T-shirts designed by artists Nate Lowman, Leo Fitzpatrick, Hanna Liden, and Adam McEwen, advertising phrases like, “I hate you because you make me hate you” and “Ludes make better lovers.”

“These artists come as a group,” said founder and designer Yael Aflalo, formerly of the Ya-Ya clothing label. “You get one of them to do the collaboration, you get them all.” This is the first of many collabs Aflalo has in the works. Up next: photographer-turned-graffiti artist Curtis Kulig (who was there last night). “We are planning to do collaborations with different people every month and Curtis is doing one next, but I can’t tell you the details yet,” Aflalo said. Until then, stay tuned.

Photo: Alexander Porter / BFAnyc.com

L.A. Gets Odd

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Odd Molly co-founder Per Holknekt named his handmade and organic women’s label after a skater girl he met while living in California in the eighties. So it makes sense that the Swedish label’s first U.S. store debuts in the Golden State (L.A.’s Robertson Boulevard to be exact), where it all started. Friday night’s opening soirée, hosted by Helena Christensen, drew Heidi Klum, Kelly Osbourne, Kate Mara, Lake Bell, Mena Suvari, Tara Subkoff, Lydia Hearst, and Malin Akerman, among others, who sipped Champagne while Little Joy’s Fabrizio Moretti and Binki Shapiro manned the decks. “I love the way they mix fabrics, colors, and patterns—I like when it’s loose,” mused Christensen (pictured, with Holknekt and Klum). She knows what she’s talking about: For three years, she was the face of the line. Now she’s their photographer: She just shot Daisy Lowe for the label at the Chelsea Hotel.

The flagship boutique, which features indoor chain-link fencing, an antique chandelier, and clothing suspended from the ceiling, lives up to its odd moniker, but the fabulous attendees found plenty to love. “I’ve already ordered a piece,” said Heidi Klum, pointing to a denim jumpsuit on the wall. “The line reminds me of clothes you’d love as a kid,” added designer Tara Subkoff, who’s preparing to relaunch her own Imitation of Christ line. “It’s a little bohemian and fun.” Odd Molly’s got a launch in the works, too: its first menswear collection, which Holknekt says will be “nothing too extravagant, just good-looking clothing for guys who don’t want to look like they tried.”

Photo: WireImage/Courtesy of Odd Molly

Fêtes For Fashion’s Must-See TV

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As if there weren’t enough fashion swirling around this week, two new TV shows about the biz threw kickoff parties last night: HBO’s How to Make It in America and the Sundance Channel’s Web-based documentary miniseries Catwalk Countdown. The latter invited its featured designers to take a break from last-minute preparations at the Standard’s new poolside lounge and, er, wet bar on the 18th floor, where Erin Fetherston was haunted by visions of the impending blizzard. “We need to get models in the door,” she fretted. “And we need those boots! Last I heard, they were in Kentucky.” The countdown had begun.

Vena Cava’s Sophie Buhai revealed to us that she and Lisa Mayock have small roles in a fashion-oriented zombie movie (written and directed by photographer Elizabeth Lippman) that’s contending for a spot at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. The designer pair didn’t have a whole lot of time to talk about it, though. “We’re leaving after this to go have a pricing meeting—back to being a garmento,” Buhai said.

That busy mixture of work and fun is the subject of How to Make It in America, an ensemble drama about young creative types in New York. The cast (which includes Lake Bell and Bryan Greenberg) joined some big-time suits and HBO players Adrian Grenier and Chloë Sevigny (pictured with Greenberg, above) for a Cinema Society screening and after-party at the Bowery Hotel. Did current Angeleno Ian Edelman’s new series pass the New York authenticity test? “Ian knows his stuff,” native Upper West Sider Leelee Sobieski decided. The series—whose major plotline at this point revolves around two friends trying to launch a denim line—comes courtesy of the producers of Entourage, and Grenier half-jokingly declared himself a wee bit jealous. “They better watch their back!”

Plus, check out our Q&A with How to Make It creator and writer Ian Edelman here.

Photo: Billy Farrell / Patrick McMullan