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7 posts tagged "Leslie Fremar"

Julianne Moore’s Stylist Leslie Fremar Talks Dressing the Star for Cannes

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Julianne MooreThere’s no red carpet quite like the grand staircase at the Cannes Film Festival. With the blink of an eye, international press set off a firestorm of camera flashes that captures looks, turns, and glances from every angle imaginable. And a memorable appearance by an actress at Cannes can help land leading roles and cast her into a different style stratosphere—no pressure, of course. Just hours before Leslie Fremar’s client Julianne Moore made her first appearance at the festival for David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars yesterday (wearing custom Louis Vuitton, no less), we sat down with the stylist to talk why Cannes is different than any other red-carpet, and what we can expect to see at the grandest festival of them all.

When Cannes approaches, what are your first thoughts? What is the prep?
It’s exciting because it’s probably the only festival, or the only time, where people can go all out and wear whatever they want. It’s kind of like that fantasy moment where anything goes and you can be more elaborate and it’s so much grander. At the Oscars and Golden Globes, people are a little more concerned about the critics, and here I feel like it’s a lot freer…it’s fun. There’s a lot of prep. It depends which approach you take, whether you’re having things custom-made or if you’re just trying on couture. You decide with your client where you want to go, and then you kind of push it from there. Julianne actually has three red carpets, so she’s wearing one vintage dress that we’ve been working on for a while, and then she has one custom dress, and then she has another that’s couture.

How is Cannes different from other red carpets in terms of styling?
I think that for stylists, it’s more fun because you can choose things that are a little bit more avant-garde and that have a more European sensibility. I like to push it a little bit and not pick just a safe bias-cut dress.

Are there any challenges unique to Cannes? If so, how do you handle them?
With the Oscars or something like that, you’re with your client getting them ready. It’s unusual to travel to Cannes to help them, so you’re sending them off with these major looks and you’re just hoping that everything goes smoothly. Usually the fashion houses will step up and help. So if she’s wearing a European brand, someone will usually come meet her and help her get dressed, which is different from the Oscars, where it’s all about the stylist being there and making sure everything goes smoothly.

How do you go about picking looks for Cannes?
I did some research and saw what was out there and went through pictures of Julianne and did multiple fittings, and we just narrowed it down to the looks that we loved. So it’s kind of a trial-and-error process. You’re looking at sketches, you’re looking at actual pieces, and it’s about making decisions together based on what the event is. She has so many things, from day press to the steps to the red carpet to parties, so she went there with lots of clothes. I did her whole wardrobe for her while she’s there, and I think she went with twelve or thirteen looks.

Is there any particular inspiration you have for Cannes dressing? French Riviera or old Hollywood?
No, I think it’s more that I like to support French design houses when my clients are there. It’s kind of fun to be in France wearing a French designer. And it doesn’t have to be that way and it doesn’t always work out that way, but it is nice to celebrate French design while you’re there.

Does you client’s film ever play a role in the styling decisions?
Yeah, I think Julianne’s role in Maps to the Stars is dark and risqué, and I think her outfit will be the same.

Was there any inspiration in particular for Julianne’s looks?
Honestly, I try to stay away from that. When you’re doing someone’s personal wardrobe and all those types of looks, it’s all about keeping it modern and moving forward instead of inspirational and playing on something that already existed. So our momentum is always moving forward, being current, being fashion-forward, and picking something great that she probably couldn’t get away with wearing in America.

Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton 

Ladies who Lunch

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“I’m literally here for a few hours,” said shoe designer Nicholas Kirkwood, who flew to New York from London for a luncheon at Bergdorf Goodman yesterday. The occasion? The arrival of his new Spring collection, which, featuring pearl-soled pumps and swirling metallic sandals, was on display in the center of the department store’s famed shoe floor. “It’s nice to meet the customers and have lunch with some New York ladies,” laughed Kirkwood, who revealed that he’s opening a new store in the Wynn Las Vegas this June and hopes to launch handbags in the next year.

Indeed, he attracted quite a set of ladies—from New York and elsewhere. The likes of Shala Monroque, Suno’s Erin Beatty, Hannah Bronfman, and Julie Gilhart joined hosts Cecilia Dean and Leslie Fremar to fete Kirkwood. A five-months-pregnant Margherita Missoni took a break from renovating her and her husband’s New York pad to dine with the designer. “I have a harder time wearing very, very high heels now,” conceded Missoni, who’s working on a book to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of her family’s house. “I’m loving wedges, so I bought three pairs to wear over the summer. And I’m so over platforms.” If the Spring trend reports are any indication, she’s not alone. “I’ve been trying to do single soles since 2009,” said Kirkwood. “I would have been happy if they went out, like, two years ago.”

Valerie Steele, who included Kirkwood’s shoes in FIT’s Shoe Obsession exhibition and lauded him as one of the “emerging superstars of shoe design,” was skeptical. “There are a lot of people who have practiced very hard to wear their platforms, and who love the extra height it gives, so I think they’re going to remain an option,” she said. “And, of course, just because it’s swinging toward single sole now doesn’t mean that in eighteen months it won’t swing back.”

Photo: BFAnyc.com/Matteo Prandoni

Hollywood’s Most Powerful Stylists Revealed

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The results are in. Today, The Hollywood Reporter released its third annual list of Hollywood’s 25 Most Powerful Stylists. The winners include big names we’ve been hearing a lot about of late—Kate Young, who’s been whipping up a buzz with her new Target collection (and who styles Michelle Williams, Rachel Weisz, and Natalie Portman), came in at number four. Elizabeth Stewart, who chronicled her experience styling Amanda Seyfried, Jessica Chastain, Julia Roberts, and Cody Horn for the Golden Globes for Style.com, came in at number five. And Rachel Zoe, who styled Anne Hathaway and Jennifer Lawrence in their much-talked-about Oscar gowns, slid in at number three. Petra Flannery, who styles Emma Stone, Zoe Saldana, and Megan Fox, was this year’s runner-up. And the big winner is (drumroll, please) Leslie Fremar, who styles discerning stars like Julianne Moore, Charlize Theron, and Jennifer Connelly. A surprise on the list was designer (and Mick Jagger’s girlfriend) L’Wren Scott, who came in at number sixteen for dressing Nicole Kidman.

Photo: Courtesy of The Hollywood Reporter

Building A Better Barneys

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While Barneys’ Madison Avenue flagship is getting an extensive renovation, the retailer’s online home is getting some work done, too. This week, Barneys revealed the new, revamped Barneys.com, with new features to streamline browsing and product suggestions from a host of influencers, including Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, Julianne Moore and her stylist Leslie Fremar, and Rachel Chandler Guinness and Tom Guinness.

Among the new tools is a “Favorites” feature, which allows you to make categorized lists of your go-to designers, favorite products (those exclusive to Barneys are marked XO—Exclusively Ours), options in your size, and your preferred color choices, all of which can be shared across social media platforms like Twitter, Pinterest, and The Fancy. If you’re looking for ideas, there’s also a “Most Loved” section, which shows the products the most customers “Favorite.” And the editorial sub-site The Window now has designer pages as a home for each brand available to its customers. Once you’ve figured out what you want to buy, it’s just two clicks away.

Photo: Courtesy of Barneys

The Fruit Of Her Labors

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Leslie Fremar is routinely voted one of the most powerful stylists in Hollywood—powerful enough, it seems, to get even star clients like Reese Witherspoon and Charlize Theron to wear Fruit of the Loom. The trick: She designed it herself. The new collection of Fremar’s line of French-seamed tees, sinuous tanks, long cardigans, and more launched yesterday at New York’s Beauty & Essex. The rationale for the line is simple: “There were cheap T-shirts, and then there were really expensive T-shirts, $200 T-shirts, $300 T-shirts,” she says. “I wanted to have the luxury of really soft cotton with a perfect fit that’s affordable”—but the possibilities are many. “I always like some casual element in whatever I’m wearing,” Fremar explains, “because I like to be comfortable.” Even at the most rarified of events? “Fruit of the Loom on the red carpet?” She pauses. “That’s great. If you want to wear a T-shirt with a ball skirt, I won’t say no.”

Leslie Fremar for Fruit of the Loom is now available at Bloomingdales, www.bloomingdales.com.

Photo: Getty Images