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July 29 2014

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4 posts tagged "Leyla Piedayesh"

At Day Two of Berlin Fashion Week, a Modest Proposal

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berlin

Modesty was the dominant theme during the second day of Berlin fashion week—not on the catwalks but in conversation. Throughout the tent and on the street, Germans were expressing self-deprecating sympathy for the Brazilians, especially the football players’ families, who were undoubtedly having a pretty awful day after Germany won the World Cup match by six goals. At BFW, in typical Berliner style, however, a modest worldview was counterbalanced by lots of unashamed displays of skin. Marcel Ostertag showed models in sheer polka-dot blouses and summoned the spirits of sexy sixties artists Niki de Saint Phalle and Tom Wesselmann with trompe l’oeil dresses, jumpers, and jackets whose neon ovals outlined models’ breasts. For her Lala Berlin label, designer Leyla Piedayesh paired loose and comfy yummy mummy silhouettes with completely transparent silver mesh and peach silk tops. The classically conservative Frida Weyer brand offered cutout sections on pastel party dresses that exposed midriffs and obliques. Even the beautifully crisp, chic, understated Clemens en August label presented, alongside slinky jumpsuits and boyish suits, a pair of black tap pants under a translucent black dress with a pinstriped collar. Coupled with World Cup empathy, all these see-through tops exposed humble hearts of Berlin.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Dispatch From Berlin

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In between the men’s shows and Couture (kicking off today), you could be forgiven for bypassing Bebelplatz. But Berlin fashion week, which ended yesterday, sent out several polished collections last week, and celebs like Tilda Swinton and Chloë Sevigny found time to touch down in the front rows.

For trend trackers, the seventies mood that prevailed for Spring may not be going anywhere soon: Rena Lange, Laurèl (above, right), Allude, and Schumacher worked a Me Decade vibe—think a long-locked and fresh-faced Meryl Streep as muse. For something a little more structured, Hugo by Hugo Boss turned out sleek, crisp daywear and cocktail looks in a palette of black, red, and white. (The elegant show at the Neue Nationalgalerie attracted the aforementioned celebs.) For Berlin’s rowdy nightlife scene, Kaviar Gauche’s PVC tees, paired with cream-colored silk trousers, could be a good bet; and Vladimir Karaleev’s sculptural wool pieces (above, left), inspired by repeated listenings to Nirvana’s Unplugged, have a grunge sensibility that feels as fresh now as it did the first time around.

Leyla Piedayesh’s sophisticated and sexy Lala Berlin collection (above) continues to be a Berlin highlight. Inspired by children’s arts and crafts, dresses, trousers, and full, boxy suits came printed in emerald, blue, and acid lemon, a pattern like marbled paper. The shimmery details on a tiny, slinky dress looked like glitter or sprinkles, but this was a grown-up collection.

Photos: Courtesy of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week

In Berlin, A Dose Of Vitamin C

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Color psychology theorists tell us that orange signifies high energy. Fitting, then, that it’s been all over the Berlin catwalks—this season’s Berlin fashion week, kicked off by Calvin Klein yesterday, has got a renewed vigor. The local line Mongrels in Common mixed sherbet shades of orange with sky blue and navy. The luxe cashmere label Allure went for contrast, too, with vibrant orange panels sewn into deep-sea turquoise tap pants, sweater dresses, and cardigans. But the most arresting splash of vibrant orange came at Lala Berlin, where designer Leyla Piedayesh extended her signature keffiyeh scarf prints into sensual floating neon orange sheer kaftans and jumpsuits (pictured). (The palette was inspired, Piedayesh said, by a fantasy of Kurt Cobain in Africa—with the sandy orange, it looked sub-Saharan.) You might think that with Germany out of the World Cup, and the Dutch Orangemen in, the color would be verboten, but one prominent Teuton remained upbeat. As this reporter left the Lala Berlin show, Boris Becker—a front-row presence at Berlin fashion week—pointed to my radiation-orange vintage c.neeon tank and proclaimed, “Orange is good.” His glowing tan attested to it.

Photo: Courtesy of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin

Berlin Dispatch: Things Heat Up In Lala Land

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The mothers of Berlin’s coolest girls should send thank-you notes to Lala Berlin designer Leyla Piedayesh for making warm woollies the most coveted item on the city’s fashion scene. In her very first catwalk show at Bebelplatz, Berlin Fashion Week’s main venue, Piedayesh sent models slinking down the runway in loosely woven sweaters worn with S&M-inspired stilettos, silk camisoles that slid coyly off shoulders, leather leggings and little dresses with Klimt-esque patterns. The Iranian-born designer played peekaboo with the completely sheer blue jumpsuit that she topped with a black blazer, lined in a matching fabric. Whether the model was warm enough remains unclear, but Berlin Fashion week is definitely hotter with Lala Berlin on the scene.