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August 21 2014

styledotcom Sneakers and dresses make a killer combo for Fall: stylem.ag/VFUtQN pic.twitter.com/jFGCqE1dwc

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24 posts tagged "Lily Donaldson"

Olivier Zahm Keeps It Simple for UNIQLO

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Ryan McGinley and Chloe Sevigny for UNIQLO

Everyone knows that if you want to up your “cool” factor, you bring in Olivier Zahm. This strategy was not lost on UNIQLO, who appointed the Purple Diary editor as visual director for its newest campaign. Lensed by art-world darling Ryan McGinley, the ads spotlight the brand’s significantly broadened silk and cashmere range (think 330 colorways and patterns for him and her), which is available from today in stores and online. Chloë Sevigny, Lily Donaldson, and McGinley himself don UNIQLO’s latest wares while posing against simple pastel backgrounds—a visual approach that Zahm felt would convey both the simplicity and sensuality of the materials. Catch the ads’ debut here, exclusively on Style.com.

JC Penney Teams Up With Georgina Chapman

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The latest evidence of JC Penney’s aspirations to raising its fashion profile: A new campaign lensed by Craig McDean, styled by Alex White, and starring runway regulars Lily Donaldson, Chanel Iman, and Jac Jagaciak. The occasion: The retailer’s new Pearl by Georgina Chapman line. The collection, which will be available online this weekend and will hit nearly 530 JC Penney stores on March 1, aims to provide a similar red carpet romance as Chapman’s Marchesa at an accessible price point. “I’m very specific in my vision,” said Chapman, who was in rainy L.A. preparing for the Oscars when she spoke to Style.com. “Craig’s photographs are extraordinary and I’ve always wanted to work with him. He’s capable of doing anything and really captured the high-fashion sensibility of the line.” Chapman asserted that her “specific vision” applied to the creation of the range, too. Explaining that she hadn’t considered doing a high-street collaboration before JC Penney approached her, the designer stressed that she made no sacrifices and included luxe details like corseting, organza ruffles, and Chantilly lace in her first installment of the eveningwear line, which will range from $50 to $250 per piece.

“Pearl skews a little bit younger [than Marchesa],” said Chapman, noting that she designed it with her three stepdaughters in mind. (“They’re a little young for Marchesa.”) Stores will introduce around 15 new Pearl styles each month, and in some locations, the range will be housed in special, chandelier-adorned boutiques within JC Penney. Chapman has signed a multiyear contract with the retailer, and said that the project’s longer-term commitment was part of what attracted her. The fact that the partnership has a charitable aspect also made it a draw: JC Penney will be inviting customers to round up their Pearl purchases to the nearest dollar to benefit Chapman’s charity, the Pearl Fund, which helps girls to obtain scholarships. When asked how she felt the partnership would affect the Marchesa line (which she designs with Keren Craig), Chapman offered, “I don’t think it will. It’s a completely different attitude and price point. It’s easier. The clothes are grab-and-go. And they won’t break the bank.” Take a peek at Pearl’s new campaign images, which debut here on Style.com.

Photo: Craig McDean

Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far

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With the London shows wrapping today, and editors and models jetting off to Milan, it’s time to reflect on the catwalking highlights from the past two weeks. More so than any in recent memory, this season has been dominated by fresh faces. Nearly every new girl on our top-ten list from Spring, like Marine Deleeuw, Irina Kravchenko, Manon Leloup, and Esther Heesch, had majorly successful sophomore outings. But the Fall shows have brought in an additional crop of noteworthy rookies in demand.

Let’s begin with the handful of former Balenciaga exclusives, whose takeoffs were all but inevitable. Sam Rollinson (above, top left), who starred in a Burberry ad back in 2010 and was handpicked by Nicolas Ghesquière last season, had a strong NYFW. (She opened Reed Krakoff and walked Jason Wu, Alexander Wang, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Narciso Rodriguez, among others.) With a hometown advantage, the British brunette—whose cheekbones could cut glass—kept it up across the pond, scoring spots at Christopher Kane, Jonathan Saunders, and Giles. Two other Balenciaga favorites—Kremi Otashliyska and Chiharu Okunugi (above, lower right)—are also becoming runway regulars. The former hit catwalks at 3.1 Phillip Lim, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Marc Jacobs, while the Japanese stunner took turns at Rag & Bone, Rodarte, and Marc Jacobs in New York, and Erdem and Giles in London.

Opening the Alexander Wang show is usually a surefire way to go straight to the top, but this season, the second girl out—Tess Hellfeuer (above, top right)—is getting all the buzz. The model finished New York by closing Marc Jacobs, then emerged as a clear favorite of Michelle Lee in London, where she opened Jonathan Saunders and walked in Christopher Kane. Mijo Mihaljcic has also been making all the right appearances in London. Her tomboy appeal landed her spots at Burberry Prorsum, Jonathan Saunders, and Richard Nicoll. Continue Reading “Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far” »

Backstage with JD

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Model turned party and backstage fashion photographer JD Ferguson is known for capturing the sometimes stunning, sometimes hilarious, but always honest moments of fashion weeks around the globe. This Wednesday, the sharpshooter will head to Fashion Week Berlin to open his exhibition, JD Ferguson: Backstage Pass. Posted at MILA gallery and sponsored by V magazine (for whom he often shoots), the show features Ferguson’s candid images of catwalkers (like Lily Donaldson and Hanne Gaby Odiele) designers (Karl Lagerfeld) celebrities (Hilary Swank, Eva Mendes, Diane Kruger), and editors (he even got a shot of Anna Wintour almost smiling). “I hope the exhibition helps people see how fun backstage can be,” says Ferguson. “Yes, it’s definitely a lot of hard work and a grueling schedule, but there’s an energy that you can’t find anywhere else.” Some of Ferguson’s favorite images include a photo of Karl Lagerfeld and Lady Bunny (below), male models in wigs and makeup at a Galliano show, and a picture of Lily Donaldson “rushing to the runway” at Dolce & Gabbana (below). “I’d arrived late and didn’t get anything, and then suddenly I turned around and there was Lily, giving herself a once-over in the mirror. It ended up being the only image I got.”

Next up for Ferguson? His first book. But it’s not quite what one would expect from a member of the jet-setting fashion crew. “After five years straight of fashion, parties, and heavy travel, I’ve been on sabbatical in my hometown in the South, where I’ve fallen in love with photographing children,” he says. “Specifically, children who are a part of the adoptive process. It’s been very rewarding and a welcome break.”

JD Ferguson: Backstage Pass kicks off with a party on January 16 and will be open to the public from January 17 through February 23 at MILA Kunstgalerie, Linienstrasse 154, 10015 Berlin.


Photo: JD Ferguson

New York Is Burning

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Anyone who has seen the seminal documentary Paris Is Burning or tried to “strike a pose” like Madonna is familiar with voguing—the gender-bending posing that flourished during the late eighties and early nineties with New York’s “ball culture.” Last night, W Hotels paid tribute to the “legendary” underground movement by putting on its own Love Hangover Ball—a voguing competition—in support of amfAR and World AIDS Day on December 1. Hosted by Kelly Osbourne, the walk-off drew a crowd of club kids and fashion fixtures, including models Karlie Kloss, Anja Rubik, Anne Vyalitsyna, and Lily Donaldson, and designers like Richard Chai, Zac Posen, and Prabal Gurung.

“I used to go to all the voguing balls back in the day,” said Simon Doonan, who judged the event alongside a panel that included Fergie, Mickey Boardman, and Jason Wu. Wearing a fur coat and a necklace constructed out of Liberace charm bracelets, Doonan reminisced about the old days. “I knew all those people and houses: the Xtravaganzas, the House of Dorian Corey, the Mizrahis. The level of style and preparation that went into the balls is beyond description. Drag queens would still be painting on their lashes at 10 p.m., and the balls would take hours and hours, going until 3 or 4 in the morning. Hopefully that won’t be the case tonight.” W‘s style director Edward Enninful was also a judge and voguing veteran. “I’m a huge fan of voguing. Growing up, it was a very important part of all our lives,” he said. “It’s a great art form. It’s glamorous. It’s fashion. I think the new generation is really inspired by what it represents.”

Speaking of the new generation, Donaldson and Kloss were just babies during the fad’s heyday, but were quickly swept up. By the end of the performance, both girls were pounding their fists on the makeshift runway, finger-wagging, and yelling, “Work!” When asked to compare her posing abilities to the divas onstage, Donaldson enthused, “These girls are on a completely different level. I wouldn’t stand a chance against them.” Perhaps Pat McGrath summed up the evening best: “Drama, drama, drama. Fierce, fierce, fierce. Realness.” Amen.