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July 26 2014

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5 posts tagged "Lily McMenamy"

Piece d’Anarchive Casts a Cinematic Spell

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Since launching French label Piece d’Anarchive in 2011, sisters Deborah and Priscilla Royer have proven their knack for fusing the conceptual and the wearable. Case in point: their black, white, and navy Spring ’14 collection, which the pair presented in September during Paris fashion week. The collection was inspired by the house of conceptualist Jean-Pierre Raynaud, who, after devoting twenty-five years to building his abode, tore it down upon completion, because he thought it was too flawless.

Boasting every imaginable iteration of grids and stripes, the graphic wool, nylon, leather, mesh, and silk wares are showcased in an austere film by director Takuya Uchiyama and artistic director Tiffany Godoy. “The idea was to stage our own gang, to show the reality and attitude behind the brand,” the designers told Style.com. Indeed, the short is chock-full of attitude, thanks in part to a pouty Lily McMenamy, who stars alongside such models as Barbara Lear, Amandine Choquet, and Jimmy Q. “Everything about Lily is unusual compared to other models. She moves in a wild way. She is not afraid to do acrobatic gestures, and she stares at the camera as if she was casting a spell on it.” Watch the bewitching video’s debut here, exclusively on Style.com.

i-D Ups Its Online Game

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i-D

Last week, i-D rolled out its eye-popping new Web site, i-d.co. Having launched with a collaborative M.I.A. x Kenzo music video, the iconic magazine’s new online home will offer full-bleed imagery, quirky videos starring personalities such as Rick Owens, Lily McMenamy, Sky Ferreira, and more, and, soon, an interactive social-media component. The Web venture, which was feted at a veritable runway rave in New York last night, is a decidedly high-tech move for the publication, which, founded by Terry Jones in 1980, earned cult status because of its gritty fanzine approach to documenting London’s creative culture. Of course, it also helped that, early in their careers, photographers such as Nick Knight, Mario Testino, and Juergen Teller shot for the publication, and Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and even Madonna winked for its covers in their youth.

The site is thanks in part to Vice—the forward-thinking, in-your-face, Brooklyn-based media company that acquired i-D last December. “Vice’s whole push was to take i-D into the digital realm, which it wasn’t. We had a Web site, but it’s nothing like what we have now,” offered i-D editor Holly Shackleton. “Vice has been incredibly respectful. They haven’t been involved in our editorial choices,” she added. “They’ve just given us the digital know-how and business sense to start something new and launch the site.” More developments are on the horizon. i-D will soon open an office here in New York, and Jones, who’s been with the publication for the past thirty-three years, will take a notable step back. “He’ll always be on the masthead as founder,” offered Shackleton, stressing that while he’ll still be somewhat involved, he’s looking to spend more time with his family.

The Web site’s launch party in West Chelsea was a fitting display of fresh, edgy clothes and pioneering technology. In partnership with Samsung, the magazine flew over three of London’s hottest new talents—Ryan LO, Claire Barrow, and Ashley Williams (all Fashion East alums)—and had them present their collections in a holographic show. It was one-part IRL models (including Hanne Gaby Odiele), one-part virtual projections. Audience members (M.I.A. among them) could hardly tell who was real and who was simulated as the catwalkers danced amid computer-generated acid rain and floating gemstones. The crowd bounced and, at some points, fist-pumped to the EDM runway tunes. And even though partygoers were sipping champagne, the event exuded the underground cool that made i-D a force in the first place. “i-D has always been a global fashion community, and we hope the new site will encourage that,” said Shackleton. “We wanted to introduce these young British talents to a New York audience. They’re all future stars, without a doubt.”

Take a look at i-D‘s new online digs at www.i-d.vice.com.

Photo: Laura June Kirsch

Kristen McMenamy Through The Years

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As the self-proclaimed “first weird-looking model,” Kristen McMenamy has broken just about every rule there is during her thirty years (and counting) in fashion, which exactly is why we chose to profile her in the new issue of Style.com/Print. Throughout her career, the irreverent icon became renowned for her androgynous appeal, eccentric personality, madwoman-on-a-mission runway walk, and willingness to sacrifice life and limb in pursuit of the elusive perfect picture.

McMenamy was a fixture in the glossies during her nineties heyday (back then, her cropped hair, shaved eyebrows, unconventional features, and sinewy frame made her an ideal poster girl for the grunge movement); she has shot with the likes of Steven Meisel, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Juergen Teller, and Nick Knight, who took the pared-down portraits of her that run in Style.com/Print. Along the way, she has cultivated a support system of designers. “If fashion is her family, then Donatella Versace is her big sister,” writes Jo-Ann Furniss in her profile. That makes Karl Lagerfeld McMenamy’s proverbial father. Lagerfeld did, after all, walk her down the aisle at her ’99 wedding to photographer Miles Aldridge, in addition to casting her in a multitude of campaigns and runway shows.

See them all in our slideshow roundup of McMenamy’s career highlights >

Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far

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With the London shows wrapping today, and editors and models jetting off to Milan, it’s time to reflect on the catwalking highlights from the past two weeks. More so than any in recent memory, this season has been dominated by fresh faces. Nearly every new girl on our top-ten list from Spring, like Marine Deleeuw, Irina Kravchenko, Manon Leloup, and Esther Heesch, had majorly successful sophomore outings. But the Fall shows have brought in an additional crop of noteworthy rookies in demand.

Let’s begin with the handful of former Balenciaga exclusives, whose takeoffs were all but inevitable. Sam Rollinson (above, top left), who starred in a Burberry ad back in 2010 and was handpicked by Nicolas Ghesquière last season, had a strong NYFW. (She opened Reed Krakoff and walked Jason Wu, Alexander Wang, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Narciso Rodriguez, among others.) With a hometown advantage, the British brunette—whose cheekbones could cut glass—kept it up across the pond, scoring spots at Christopher Kane, Jonathan Saunders, and Giles. Two other Balenciaga favorites—Kremi Otashliyska and Chiharu Okunugi (above, lower right)—are also becoming runway regulars. The former hit catwalks at 3.1 Phillip Lim, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Marc Jacobs, while the Japanese stunner took turns at Rag & Bone, Rodarte, and Marc Jacobs in New York, and Erdem and Giles in London.

Opening the Alexander Wang show is usually a surefire way to go straight to the top, but this season, the second girl out—Tess Hellfeuer (above, top right)—is getting all the buzz. The model finished New York by closing Marc Jacobs, then emerged as a clear favorite of Michelle Lee in London, where she opened Jonathan Saunders and walked in Christopher Kane. Mijo Mihaljcic has also been making all the right appearances in London. Her tomboy appeal landed her spots at Burberry Prorsum, Jonathan Saunders, and Richard Nicoll. Continue Reading “Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far” »

Paris Fashion Week’s Queen Bees

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After three cities and hundreds of shows, Paris fashion week is where the most influential designers crystallize the season’s message and the major models stalk the runways. Miuccia Prada certainly delivered on the latter yesterday with arguably the best cast we’ve seen this month at Miu Miu. The lineup was bookended by Raquel Zimmermann, who opened, and closer Karen Elson. In the mix were plenty of other catwalk veterans including Malgosia Bela, Iselin Steiro, Jessica Stam, Hilary Rhoda, Delfine Bafort, and Diana Dondoe. It was a refreshing cap to a season that, for the most part, lacked big-name models. On that note, Miu Miu also illuminated some of the top newcomers including Irina Kravchenko, Marine Deleeuw, Esther Heesch, and Manon Leloup (pictured), who each had impressive freshman seasons. We’ve had our eye on Kravchenko since she opened Alexander Wang during NYFW, and the edgy redhead truly blasted off in the City of Light, where she opened Haider Ackermann, Viktor & Rolf, and Sacai and also walked Balenciaga, Givenchy, and Valentino. Meanwhile, Deleeuw’s Paris highlights included Céline, Balenciaga, Dior, and Chanel—out of all the fresh faces, Deleeuw won the numbers game with 36 shows total. After skipping New York and London, Heesch kept the momentum from her Prada debut going with turns on top Paris runways, including Valentino (which she opened), Alexander McQueen, Balenciaga, Céline, Chanel, Chloé, and Dries Van Noten. For her part, Leloup did many of those same top shows (15 total in Paris), and both opened and closed Nina Ricci.

Saint Laurent was another highly anticipated moment that delivered on noteworthy newbies. Grace Mahary closed the show and also did Balenciaga, Givenchy (where she was an exclusive last season), Balmain, and Isabel Marant earlier in the week. Hedi Slimane also plucked Kristen McMenamy’s daughter Lily as an exclusive, and she turned up at Chanel the next day. Others at SL included Juliana Schurig, who built upon her success from the first three weeks in Paris, walking Lanvin, Giambattista Valli, and Alexander McQueen, among others; Magdalena Jasek, who opened Céline and did Louis Vuitton, Valentino, and Viktor & Rolf; and Alexandra Martynova, who we first saw as a Calvin Klein exclusive and really capitalized on her androgynous appeal in Paris, closing Dior and also showing up at Rick Owens and Alexander McQueen, among others. Overall, it was a season full of promising newcomers who will be top contenders for the season’s forthcoming ad campaigns.

Photo: Courtesy Photo