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20 posts tagged "Linda Fargo"

All Jazzed Up For Coquette Atelier

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The twenties were roaring loud and clear last night at Bergdorf Goodman’s BG restaurant, where Linda Fargo (who was looking fabulous in a Jerry Hall for Thierry Mugler, champagne-colored lace pantsuit with matching bunny ears) and company toasted the launch of ready-to-wear line Coquette Atelier. Guests including Uma Thurman, Kim Cattrall, Woody Harrelson, Angela Bassett, Fred Armisen, and Paz de la Huerta enjoyed an evening of live jazz in the venue, which was Deco-ed out, right down to the napkins, matchbooks, and old-school cocktails. Rona Gaye Stevenson and Cassandra Grey, the design duo behind the new, Los Angeles-based label, scour vintage markets far and wide for one-of-a-kind pieces (like the suit Fargo was wearing) to rework. (Grey is the wife of Paramount Pictures CEO Brad Grey, which may help to explain the heavy Hollywood quotient.)

“I’m not telling you my secrets, but I shop all over,” Stevenson told Style.com. Grey added, “It’s like we’re waiting for impeccably dressed socialites to die.” The main event was the performance by vocalists Alice Smith and Frieda Lee, who just so happens to be Stevenson’s mother. They cooed and scatted along to tunes like the Gershwin classic ” ‘S Wonderful.” Lee had never performed in New York before and dedicated her set to “the love of all things fashion, history, Chicago, and, of course, jazz.”

Photo: Neil Rasmus / BFAnyc.com

Man’s Best Friend? Woman’s Best Shopping Adviser

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“All we’re missing is the opium,” said Bergdorf Goodman’s Linda Fargo. Everything but was on the menu when BG transformed its seventh-floor restaurant into a casbah for a lunch and mini fashion show of Chanel’s Paris-Byzance Pre-Fall collection yesterday afternoon. It might’ve been the first time ever that Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon has played in the tony eatery. The occasion: a celebration of the retailer’s new Chanel shop-in-shop on the second floor, where a trunk show of said collection happens to be taking place. Once the models slipped out of their frocks, they were whisked downstairs for customers to ogle up close. The Peter Marino-designed space is 50 percent bigger than the department store’s previous Chanel shop, and the back-of-house, client services space is 100 percent bigger. “Bergdorf Goodman and Chanel’s relationship goes back to the eighties, I believe, and we finally have a shop that’s on par with the quality of the product,” Fargo added. She had no argument on the subject with one shopper. Chanel ambassador Leigh Lezark overheard one well-dressed lady ask her dog what it thought of a tweedy jacket. “What do you think,” she said to the pooch, “do you like the gray?” Far-out.

Photo: Neil Rasmus / BFAnyc.com

Nicole Richie, Working Woman

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In a sequestered corner on Bergdorf Goodman’s seventh floor last night, Nicole Richie was a long ways from The Simple Life. “I honestly am so thankful for where I am right now,” Richie said at the BG-hosted fête for her line House of Harlow 1960. “It’s so great to reach a point where you see your pieces on a woman on the street and she looks amazing, but she may not even know it was me that was behind it. She likes it for what it is.” Anonymity in this digital age is a luxury, but it also has its limits; a crush of photographers circled Richie for the rest of the event. The former reality star, however, is just fine juggling press, family, and work. “I’m a Virgo,” she said. “I’m a born multitasker.”

The designer and entrepreneur will soon be putting those balancing skills to use. Between trips to Paris, New York, and L.A. this past month and then market appointments and touring with husband Joel Madden’s band Good Charlotte in March, Richie is racking up the frequent-flyer miles. Jet-lag be damned, she brought the glamour in a strapless bustier dress and a Veronica Lake wave to her very blond hair. “She’s really hit her stride and it shows,” Bergdorf’s Linda Fargo said. “She’s especially beautiful tonight in this old-screen-siren-meets-modern-girl way. It’s very Harlow.” The fashion director is gearing up for a busy New York fashion week and was heading home to strategize wardrobe choices for the next seven days, something Richie won’t have to worry about this season around. “I’m strictly here to work, so I’m not attending any shows,” she said, though pals Charlotte Ronson and Tracy Anderson stopped in to say hello. “I’m headed back to L.A. and then I’ll be back next week to meet with retailers.” While in town, she will make time for one NYC pit stop. “The Smile,” Richie said of her favorite city spot. “I always get the egg sandwich—it’s the best.”

Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com

Bill, Please

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In the bygone days before street-style blogs, there was just one man whose eye you hoped your outfit would catch. That’s The New York Times‘ Bill Cunningham, of course, a beloved staple on the fashion circuit for the last 50-plus years and the man who pioneered the art of snapping fashion trends as they happen on the street, at the gala, or in the front row. So no surprise that last night, several of his acolytes turned up at the CFDA and Calvin Klein-hosted screening of the documentary Bill Cunningham New York to pay tribute. “Of course we had to see this film,” Garance Doré said. Her date, Scott Schuman (a.k.a. the Sartorialist) agreed: “I think any street-style photographer is familiar with his work.”

This was a tribute paid in absentia: The modest Cunningham has made it mostly a point not to attend screenings of the film. But he was practically the only person in fashion not present. Calvin Klein’s Francisco Costa and Italo Zucchelli (above, with BCNY producer Philip Gefter and director Richard Press), Carolyn Murphy, Rag & Bone’s Marcus Wainwright, Bergdorf Goodman’s Linda Fargo, and editors like Grace Coddington and Sally Singer all made a Monday evening appearance. So did model Ginta Lapina, who saved her last night out before fashion week fittings for the documentary. “I love movies. It’s one of my favorite things to do in cold weather,” the 21-year-old blonde told us before the lights dimmed. “I see him all the time during the shows and he’s always so sweet. But then I watched the trailer before I came here and I’m excited to find out a different side.”

It’s that different side that the doc highlights, particularly Cunningham’s deep commitment to his craft. “You see him at all the events, but you didn’t know about his integrity,” Costa marveled. “One of the most amazing things is his honesty. It’s beyond inspirational.”

Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com

FGI Catches A Few Rising Stars

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“At one point in my career, I had $98, a mattress, and a floor,” Norma Kamali told us at the Fashion Group International’s 14th Annual Rising Star Awards luncheon, hosted by Condé Nast Digital editorial director Jamie Pallot. “There’s always going to be something that tests your ability, so get past it and then get over it.”

Kamali, the keynote speaker at the Cipriani 42nd Street event, offered similar words of wisdom to an audience that included Catherine Malandrino, Prabal Gurung, Eddie Borgo, Julia Restoin-Roitfeld, Maria Cornejo, and Lauren Bush, and rising stars Fabiola Arias and Bradley Scott Reisman (who tied for the womenswear award), and Loris Diran (who won for men’s). “To have this fabulous designer hand you the torch,” enthused Arias after Malandrino presented her with the trophy, “it’s just crazy.”

After a little carousing and a little networking—”I am leaving with a pocket full of business cards and a pocket full of promises,” Bergdorf Goodman’s Linda Fargo said—the designers, editors, and retailers reluctantly prepared to brave the snow and continue the workday. Well, most did. They may not have won the afternoon’s award, but the menswear nominees from Moods of Norway were still feeling celebratory. “We want to do Shirley Temple body shots and then go build a snowman,” designer Stefan Dahlkvist said. “Are you in?”